Feeling Guilt...


#1

I recently foud out that missing Mass is a mortal sin. I have done that recently, but when at home I knew Mass was going on and I said a prayer to Jesus asking Him to forgive me not for going because my family didn’t take me. I know it is essential to know you are sinning to sin, and I didn’t know I was sinning, but I still feel guilty…any advice?? :confused:


#2

[quote=scapularkid8]I recently foud out that missing Mass is a mortal sin. I have done that recently, but when at home I knew Mass was going on and I said a prayer to Jesus asking Him to forgive me not for going because my family didn’t take me. I know it is essential to know you are sinning to sin, and I didn’t know I was sinning, but I still feel guilty…any advice?? :confused:
[/quote]

If you didn’t go because your family couldn’t or didn’t want to take you, AND you were unable to get to Mass by yourself (or go with someone outside the family) then it’s not a sin at all to miss it. The sin is to miss mass with no good reason. Having no transport is a good enough reason.

I’m curious about your statement that you prayed for forgiveness though. Did you skip deliberately but thought that it was just a minor sin? Or did you have no means of getting to Mass?

If you did miss, even deliberately, but honestly didn’t know it was a mortal sin, then you’re absolutely in the clear. Remember that God knows the state of your heart and mind better even than you do, so he knows you didn’t intentionally commit a mortal sin.


#3

Call your local parish and talk to a priest.

If you can’t go, can ask a friend take you?


#4

Hey Scapularkid,
If you feel guilty about it, you can always speak to a priest about it in confession to clarify with him. It doesn’t hurt to do so; in fact you’ll be more relieved about it whether you just want to know if it’s a mortal sin or whether you want to receive absolution in the case that it is a mortal sin. God bless you.

-Alison


#5

It’s not that they wouldn’t take me, it’s just that we usually go on Sunday when we have something to do on Saturday (we usually go on Saturday). It surprised me when I looked at the clock and Mass was starting and we hadn’t gone. I didn’t know it was a Mortal Sin either, but I still feel bad.


#6

I’d say a mistake like that is understandable if you are used to going on Saturday night, and if as you said you weren’t aware that it was a mortal sin then you’re fine.

Either way it might be best for you to confess and seek advice from the priest to ease your own mind.


#7

Though it is preferable that you go on Sunday, you can fulfill the Sunday obligation by attending the Saturday evening Mass (I say evening because the Morning Masses on Saturday at many of the Churches I know are not meant to substitute for the Sunday Mass, while the evening Saturday Masses do). So if you’ve been going on Saturdays to participate in the Eucharistic celebration, it’s fine. But, if your family can, it is highly recommended to go on Sunday.
Yes, but like LilyM said, it’s best to check with your priest to clear your conscience.


#8

[quote=Alison]Though it is preferable that you go on Sunday, you can fulfill the Sunday obligation by attending the Saturday evening Mass
[/quote]

I’ve always wondered why people believe a Sunday morning Mass to be somehow superior to the evening Saturday Mass when the Church says nothing of the sort and both meet the Sunday obligation.


#9

Mike, its seems that the churches in my area are different from yours. The Evening Saturday Mass at our church is held to fulfill the Sunday obligation, but not the morning Mass.


#10

In fact this is the first time I’ve heard that going on Sunday is better or indeed any different at all to going to the Saturday vigil. Since when is it highly recommended to go on Sunday?

My parents think sort of the opposite - they say that Sat evening or Sun morning is much better than the Sunday evening mass.

Doesn’t make any sense to me. Sat evening, Sun morning, Sun evening mass are all exactly the same thing!


#11

[quote=scapularkid8]It’s not that they wouldn’t take me, it’s just that we usually go on Sunday when we have something to do on Saturday (we usually go on Saturday). It surprised me when I looked at the clock and Mass was starting and we hadn’t gone. I didn’t know it was a Mortal Sin either, but I still feel bad.
[/quote]

Maybe you could encourage your parents to leave earlier or to be on time. How far do you live from the Church? Could you walk or ride your bike? Just some thoughts.

My undstanding is that it’s a mortal sin in you intentionally blow off going to church…sounds like you are making an effort… call your priest and talk to him…he would know better.


#12

Thanks for all your help guys. It’s just…I’ve been in a state of mortal sin before and recieved the Eucharist. I never want to do that again. It has scarred me so much and every Rosary I say I just ask Mary to offer the prayers to God in reparation for it. I don’t want to deal with Confession again. Not because I don’t like it (well, I do get nervous) but because our family knows the priest VERY well and it would be rather embarassing. I can’t drive either and the only other Catholic church is on the other side of town! :confused: Just thought I’d let you all know why I’m so stressed about this.


#13

[quote=scapularkid8]Thanks for all your help guys. It’s just…I’ve been in a state of mortal sin before and recieved the Eucharist. I never want to do that again. It has scarred me so much and every Rosary I say I just ask Mary to offer the prayers to God in reparation for it. I don’t want to deal with Confession again. Not because I don’t like it (well, I do get nervous) but because our family knows the priest VERY well and it would be rather embarassing. I can’t drive either and the only other Catholic church is on the other side of town! :confused: Just thought I’d let you all know why I’m so stressed about this.
[/quote]

I had the same problem when I was a kid, because the priest did know my family very well indeed. Most churches do have the option of anonymous confession, however, and with the number of confessions priests hear I would be surprised if he remembered yours. After all it’s not like you’d be confessing a murder or anything that would make him sit up and pay attention.

I confess regularly every week, have been for months and I still get nervous when I go! I firstly think of it as the devil’s way of trying to get me to not go by making it feel unpleasant. Secondly I offer up the embarrassment and nervous feelings to God - think of it as getting an early start on your penance if that helps.

And please don’t start worrying about past mortal sins once they’ve been forgiven and penance done for them - again this is a trick of the devil, to try to make us unsure that we’ve been forgiven. If you are sincere in your confession, and judging by your posts I’m sure you are, the moment you’ve finished your penance you have adequately paid for your sin. SIn isn’t like crime where it stays on your record even after you’ve paid a penalty - when it’s forgiven it’s FORGOTTEN - totally!


#14

[quote=Mike O]I’ve always wondered why people believe a Sunday morning Mass to be somehow superior to the evening Saturday Mass when the Church says nothing of the sort and both meet the Sunday obligation.
[/quote]

Saturday Masses were started after Vatican II for those who had no way of making Mass on Sundays due to vital work obligations. (i.e. working in Hospitals, Police, Fire, etc.).

Yet, in the early Christian tradition, much like the Jewish tradition, the time of day started at sundown, not at Midnight. In the Christan/Catholic East, we start our day and count it at sundown. So Vespers starts the Liturgical Day, and our fasts and feast always start at sundown.


#15

Off the topic, but does that mean that we can’t eat meat after sundown on Thursdays but then we can eat meat after sundown on Friday? I always thought it was midnight to midnight.


#16

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