Feminists in the Catholic Church


#1

I am curious why feminists stay in the Catholic Church even though they are not allowed to have equal leadership roles, when Pope Francis has clearly said, That door is closed, when they are treated like second class citizens. Why would they stay when they could easily become Angelicans or Episcopalians?


#2

Why are you equating all “feminists” with those who want female priestly ordination?


#3

If you’re referring to just priestly ordination, many don’t stay. Many do become Anglicans or Lutherans. One of the former priests of my church, who was recently made vicar of her own parish, is an ex-Catholic (and not Episcopal priest) for that very reason.

If you’re referring to feminism in general. It and Catholicism are not mutually exclusive.


#4

Cool troll, bro.


#5

You shouldn’t leave because you disagree with a teaching, you should leave because that church is not the truth.

Clearly these women believe in the church, or at least some aspects of it (the eucharist for example) and that the priesthood will be changed bc they think it’s not infallible teaching. So they stay.

Literally doesn’t make sense for women who believe in the one true catholic church to just become a protestant so she can become a priest. Usually those who actually leave are people who use emotions over logic/think all churches are the same


#6

Well, what do you mean by feminist?


#7

Very interesting in that Mary, the ‘original’ feminist was and knew that She was secondary to her son Jesus. We venerate and honor her in that position. She was chosen by God not as 1st place, but as the Mother, mentor, teacher and supporter of her Son.
We know how important that women were in building and supporting the church and have continued to do so throughout Church history, and now as well. Christ didn’t say to any of the woman that followed Him and the apostles, "Upon this Rock I build my Church."
As I read the post I thought that the poster really was not seeking the good of the Church, but to elevate her status in life. And I also wonder if the poster is really a ‘Sister.’


#8

first post and you come out with this?
I guess you’re not too familiar with Catholicism.
Most of the leadership roles in parishes are headed up by women.

I call “troll” :rolleyes:


#9

Why would I bail on the Real Presence of Jesus because I wasn’t getting a big enough “leadership role”? The Church is not some employer that I quit because I can get a promotion at the place up the street. It’s part of my identity, and the Eucharist is the source of life.

I wanted to be a Jesuit when I was young. Obviously, wasn’t gonna happen. I decided God must want me to do something else and moved on with my life.

I have less than zero desire to join the Church of England, partly because its denizens spent a lot of time persecuting my ancestors and partly because I think it’s a wishy-washy spinoff of the real thing. I’m fully convinced that women in “leadership roles” will happen in the RC Church eventually, though I may not live to see it.


#10

I assumed she meant “priest” or “bishop” etc.
Because women sure are doing everything else :slight_smile:


#11

She probably doesn’t realize that there are also many female Seminary profs either.


#12

As long as we’re having this discussion, I wonder are there any percentages online anyplace for how many female members of clergy in Protestant churches are ex-Catholics? Just curious now.


#13

When I see a woman (or men, too) complain about women not having “leadership roles” and the power that priests and bishops have, I immediately disregard their credibility.

As one discerning vocation myself, I am really wary of those who seek priesthood because of power.

All one has to do is look up YouTube videos of dissident catholic women’s “ordinations” to see where their priorities are. They are concerned with their warped views of power and liberation more than anything else.


#14

women having leadership roles is NOT the same as being a feminist - sheesh!

owl.li/b66J30dCA0G


#15

I’ve been Catholic all of my life and never been treated as a second class citizen. God loves us equally. Why would I walk away from Him? I belong in His church.
May God bless you and all who visit our thread.
Amen.


#16

Why would men stay in the Church, since they are blocked from doing all kinds of fun things like cursing, stealing, lying, getting drunk, fornicating, viewing pornography, etc.?

Why would they stay when they could easily become Atheists or Agnostics?


#17

:rotfl:

Little agenda there?

Thanks for posting and running. If you ever want to have a real conversation, feel free to stop on by here at CAF in the future.

Seriously… sheesh. :rolleyes:


#18

I think people are jumping on the troll and “posting and running” accusations a bit quickly here. It’s her first post. And it was only 6 hours ago; she hasn’t been back online since then. This may well be a sincere question and I think us regulars ought to treat it that way, at least until proven otherwise.

OP, I agree with others that equating those who want female ordination with feminists is off-base. While it’s probably true that all or most feminists want that, not all those who want that are feminists (i.e. all A are B, but not all B are A).

My own mother-in-law supports female ordination and she is in no way, shape or form a feminist.

If I had to guess at her answer to your question (“why not leave?”), I suspect she’d say it’s because she believes the Catholic Church is the true Church with the reality of Christ’s presence in the Eucharist. She thinks that someday the Church will allow it (and she wouldn’t run out and be part of dissident women’s “ordinations” prior to that).

I think a lot of her thoughts on the matter stem from 15 years as a nun early in her life. As we regularly visit her old convent and spend time with the remaining sisters, I can see where they are coming from (I don’t agree with it, but I think I understand it).


#19

I’ve always considered myself a feminist; women’s ordination is, in my mind, a non-issue. There are many versions of feminism to choose from.
Perhaps the O.P. would like to be more specific in what s/he considers feminist parameters?


#20

Right. “Feminist” comes in 31 flavors nowadays. I’ve always considered myself a “feminist” also; I support equal pay and women going into non-traditional careers and being in management, etc.

However, most of the self-styled “feminists” I meet nowadays seem to have their feminism revolving around the “right” (nebulous legally at best) to an abortion, which I do not support. Some of them also seem to see “feminism” as a euphemism for hating on men, which I also do not support.


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