FFSP and ICKSP priests compared to diocesan priests

What are the differences between diocesan priests and FFSP and ICKSP priests?

I know they’re not monastic orders, but they also aren’t diocesan. Do they stay in a community etc?

Here's a link to the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest. It may answer your questions. :)

institute-christ-king.org/institute/questions/
Duh!

Persons who are not consecrated religious are all canonically secular men or women. A priest who is not a consecrated religious, meaning that he is not in vows, is a secular priest. Most secular priests belong to a diocese; therefore, we refer to them as diocesan priests. But there are secular priests who retain their secular state, but live in community. Those communities are called Priestly Societies or Societies of Apostolic Life.

The older ones that most of us know are: Maryknoll, Vincentians, Pierists, and Opus Dei. There are others, but they are not many in the USA. Most priests in the USA are either Diocesan or Consecrated Religious (meaning that the man is both a priest and a religious).

The FSSP, ICKSP and the SSPX are the youngest kids on the block of priestly societies. These communities usually refer to themselves as Fraternities or Institutes. But they are in the same canonical group as diocesan priests. Some societies require that the member make a promise to live by the statutes of the society. This is not the same as making vows, but it does bind them to the society permanently.

However, since these are societies, the Church does allow them to have a major superior who is not the local bishop. The difference between them and religious (ie. Franciscans, Jesuits, Carmelites, Salesians, Christian Brothers, Marists, etc) is that the major superiors of religious have the same juridical authority as a bishop, even if they are not priests. This means that they decide who can be ordained, they decide on assignments, and he can grant any priest faculties to hear confessions in any house under his direction. The major superior also contracts with local bishops to allow his men to enter a diocese and minister to the people there.

Priestly societies never have superiors who are not priests. All of their superiors must be priests. For religiuos orders the priesthood is what we call accidental, not essential. You can have entire communities of Dominicans, Franciscans or Marianists who are not priests and the life is the same as if they had priests in the hosue. They only need priests to celebrate mass for them. They usually go to the local parish or pay a priest to come in and celebrate mass.

Priestly societies can varying degrees of community life. In some societies they pray, eat, recreate and work together. In other societies they don't spend as much time together. They come together as a community to help each other in ministry, but live pretty independantly.

A diocesan priest does not live, pray or share his life with the priests in his house, unless they agree to do so. Every rectory is different. In some the priests get along very well and become good friends. They have prayer and meals together. In other rectories they may have one night a week when the pray and eat together. Some rectories the priests are really housemates, but each leads his own life.

This is why the priestly societies and the diocesan priests are canonically secular men. They are not bound to the intense community life that religious men have. We pray, play, sleep, work, and do everything as a community. We have no property of our own. We ask for permission to buy something, to leave the house, to travel, even to do ministry. Secular priests don't have these restrictions. The FSSP and ICKSP do many things in common, but they are also much more independent from each other than are religious, yet not as independent as diocesan.

One mroe thing, don't confuse priestly societies with religious orders that have "society" as part of their name. For example, the Jesuits are properly called the Society of Jesus (SJ). But they are an order, not a priestly society. Mother Teresas Sisters are the Society of Missionaries of Charity; but they too are religious, not a secular society. Society in canon law can mean two things: a losely bound group such as FSSP or ICKSP or an association of religious.

I hope this helps.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :)

The proper initials for the Institute of Christ the King, Sovereign Priest are ICRSS. The initials for the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter are FSSP.

Thanks for your answers.

[quote="JReducation, post:4, topic:194447"]
Persons who are not consecrated religious are all canonically secular men or women. A priest who is not a consecrated religious, meaning that he is not in vows, is a secular priest. Most secular priests belong to a diocese; therefore, we refer to them as diocesan priests. But there are secular priests who retain their secular state, but live in community. Those communities are called Priestly Societies or Societies of Apostolic Life.

The older ones that most of us know are: Maryknoll, Vincentians, Pierists, and Opus Dei. There are others, but they are not many in the USA. Most priests in the USA are either Diocesan or Consecrated Religious (meaning that the man is both a priest and a religious).

The FSSP, ICKSP and the SSPX are the youngest kids on the block of priestly societies. These communities usually refer to themselves as Fraternities or Institutes. But they are in the same canonical group as diocesan priests. Some societies require that the member make a promise to live by the statutes of the society. This is not the same as making vows, but it does bind them to the society permanently.

However, since these are societies, the Church does allow them to have a major superior who is not the local bishop. The difference between them and religious (ie. Franciscans, Jesuits, Carmelites, Salesians, Christian Brothers, Marists, etc) is that the major superiors of religious have the same juridical authority as a bishop, even if they are not priests. This means that they decide who can be ordained, they decide on assignments, and he can grant any priest faculties to hear confessions in any house under his direction. The major superior also contracts with local bishops to allow his men to enter a diocese and minister to the people there.

Priestly societies never have superiors who are not priests. All of their superiors must be priests. For religiuos orders the priesthood is what we call accidental, not essential. You can have entire communities of Dominicans, Franciscans or Marianists who are not priests and the life is the same as if they had priests in the hosue. They only need priests to celebrate mass for them. They usually go to the local parish or pay a priest to come in and celebrate mass.

Priestly societies can varying degrees of community life. In some societies they pray, eat, recreate and work together. In other societies they don't spend as much time together. They come together as a community to help each other in ministry, but live pretty independantly.

A diocesan priest does not live, pray or share his life with the priests in his house, unless they agree to do so. Every rectory is different. In some the priests get along very well and become good friends. They have prayer and meals together. In other rectories they may have one night a week when the pray and eat together. Some rectories the priests are really housemates, but each leads his own life.

This is why the priestly societies and the diocesan priests are canonically secular men. They are not bound to the intense community life that religious men have. We pray, play, sleep, work, and do everything as a community. We have no property of our own. We ask for permission to buy something, to leave the house, to travel, even to do ministry. Secular priests don't have these restrictions. The FSSP and ICKSP do many things in common, but they are also much more independent from each other than are religious, yet not as independent as diocesan.

One mroe thing, don't confuse priestly societies with religious orders that have "society" as part of their name. For example, the Jesuits are properly called the Society of Jesus (SJ). But they are an order, not a priestly society. Mother Teresas Sisters are the Society of Missionaries of Charity; but they too are religious, not a secular society. Society in canon law can mean two things: a losely bound group such as FSSP or ICKSP or an association of religious.

I hope this helps.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :)

[/quote]

very informative.

Br. JR, OSF,

Thank you for your thorough explanation. Many parishoners that I speak with only see the fact that the TLM Traditional Latin Mass is given by the members of Christ the King Sovereign Priest, specifically their institute in Gricigliano, Italy, and Germany. What is important to me is that they are not a religious order, they are not religious priests, and do not take solemn religious vows. This is also stated on their own web site. Also their web site states that they are secular canon, distinguished by their choir dress. They look peculiar in the fact that their blue choir dress and large crosses set them apart from looking anywhere near like a religious priest who wears normal vestments. It does not matter that ICKSP gives the TLM, I would rather attend mass given by a religious priest, who is a member of a religious order, and who has taken solemn religious vows.

PaulD

Why would you rather attend mass celebrated by a religious priest? :confused:

Keeping this post for later. Thanks.

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.