Fiction Books that are smut!

I have taken up the hobby of reading fiction books (novels). I am a male in my 40’s and married, also have a family. I have read several books by several authors and have been shocked by the content of some of them, lots of 4 letter words and other things I won’t mention here (The Prey series by John Sandford, and The Alex Cross series by James Patterson). I’ve read some protestant novels by Frank Perretti and Ted Dekker. I also have read some Catholic authors. I don’t always want to read “religious” fiction. Can anyone give suggestions for authors and titles of books that would be good to read? Thank you.

Have you read The Lord of the Rings? It was very justly called the greatest novel of the 20th Century, and in my opinion is one of the greatest books ever written :smiley:

(And btw seeing the movies doesn’t count. While they were interesting films, the spirit of the books can only be gotten be reading the books themselves (it is actually six books though one story)

The Hunger Games is really good. Don’t be turned of by it being a “young adult” series.

Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell. Get past the first 100 pages. It’s a great book.

Shogun.

Atonement.

The Haunting of Hill House. If you like scary books this is very good.

If you like James Patterson, have you tried P.D. James? She writes excellent mystery novels. :slight_smile:

[quote="irishOntarian, post:2, topic:279043"]
Have you read The Lord of the Rings? It was very justly called the greatest novel of the 20th Century, and in my opinion is one of the greatest books ever written :D

(And btw seeing the movies doesn't count. While they were interesting films, the spirit of the books can only be gotten be reading the books themselves (it is actually six books though one story)

[/quote]

Yes, I have read those, long ago and I did like them.

Are Shogun and Atonement written by the above authors or someone else?

There are some classics that are also enjoyable to read. For example, I just read "Main Street" by Sinclair Lewis - he was a bit of a crank and an atheist/agnostic, but he had a way with words, and his writing is surprisingly witty. It's nice to sometimes read something that challenges your vocabulary and makes you think a little bit, as opposed to a lot of contemporary fiction which, despite having "adult themes", maxes out around a USA-Today / 4th-grade reading level.

If you want a serious but entertaining book, Catch-22 is a good one.

What kind of books do you like?

Here are a few for you to consider. :thumbsup:

*A Tale of Two Cities
*Oliver Twist
*Great Expectations
or just about anything else by Charles Dickens

*Les Miserables
*The Hunchback of Notre Dame
by Victor Hugo

*The Three Musketeers
*The Count of Monte Cristo
by Alexandre Dumas

*The Adventures of Tom Sawer
*The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
by Mark Twain

*Crime and Punishment
*The Brothers Karamazov
by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

*The Sun Also Rises
*The Old Man and The Sea
*For Whom The Bell Tolls
by Ernest Hemingway

*The Complete Sherlock Holmes
by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

*1984
*Animal Farm
by George Orwell

*Brave New World
by Aldous Huxley

Outside of literary classics, :hmmm:
*The Richard Sharpe Series by Bernard Cornwell
*The Aubrey-Maturin Series by Patrick O'Brian
Stephen King and Robert McCammon are good but being horror books the sex and violence is served up aplenty.

[quote="16670, post:6, topic:279043"]
Are Shogun and Atonement written by the above authors or someone else?

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Shogun is written by James Cavell, I remember starting reading that on a ferry trip leaving Dublin when I was about 12 or so. It's a good book, although a bit of a pot boiler. There was an adaption with Richard Chamberlain made for TV.

[quote="Mystrx, post:10, topic:279043"]
Stephen King and Robert McCammon are good but being horror books the sex and violence is served up aplenty.

[/quote]

Yes, that's what I'd like to avoid.

[quote="JharekCarnelian, post:11, topic:279043"]
Shogun is written by James Cavell, I remember starting reading that on a ferry trip leaving Dublin when I was about 12 or so. It's a good book, although a bit of a pot boiler. There was an adaption with Richard Chamberlain made for TV.

[/quote]

James Clavell. Movie was produced as, I think, a six part series. It was pretty good but not nearly as intense as the novel itself. Its over a thousand pages long. If you read in bed, be prepared to be up 'til two or three in the morning for several nights in a row! Enjoy! May God Bless Us All!

Shogun was written by James Clavell. Not sure who wrote Atonement.

If you like mysteries, without graphic content or language, let me recommend Mary Higgins Clark's books (skip "Weep No More, My Lady" and "Stillwatch"--there is some problematic material in those two, though not overt), Aimee and David Thurlo's "Sister Agatha" mysteries, and Stephen F. Havill's "Posadas County" mysteries. Havill uses some profanity, but they are excellent police procedurals in a rural setting. The Thurlos' "Sister Agatha" series presents an extern nun in a cloistered order who solves mysteries.

Hope this helps!

I second the Count of Monte Cristo (my favorite book and least favorite movie) and the Lord of the Rings but if you are going to read the Lord of the Rings, be sure to read the Hobbit first.

Jane Eyre is a good old fashioned novel, when I re-read it I was surprised at how Christian it was.
The Sister Fidelma mystery series, by Peter Tremayne, are very good.
Dorothy Sayers wrote some good mysteries, the Lord Peter Wimsey books (The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club, etc).
And C.S. Lewis wrote science fiction : Perelandra, Out of the Silent Planet, That Hideous Strength.
Almost forgot: Rex Stout’s books about the detective Nero Wolfe are great, and the hero and his sidekick are always gentlemen.

As a 40 year old adult, you should be able to read such stories as a 40 year old adult. Violence, swearing and sex are the common elements of life. It is hard to retain the sense of theatre by avoiding them, and there is a risk of disconnecting the reader from the story by doing so. For some stories, these elements are completely unavoidable and the story would be for the worse without them.

For example: I think Cormac McCarthy is one of this era’s greatest writers and have enjoyed all of his books, especially The Road and Blood Meridian. There is a lot of violence, swearing and sex in his books, but his stories (to me at least) are an incredible reflection on humanity, and the plot transcends those elements which you may find distasteful. Just remember that in the end they are just parts that make up the whole.

I think it’s rather silly to refer to a book with a sex scene in it as ‘smut’. There is a specific genre of books dedicated to smut and it’s called erotica.

I like the Alex Cross books, though I agree the sex scenes are gratuitous.

I also enjoyed reading the Harry Potter books, when my daughters were done with them.

The Janet Evanovich books (One for the Money, Two for the Dough, etc) are enjoyable.

There’s a wonderful list of classics in a previous post. I don’t remember if this was on that list, but To Kill a Mockingbird is one of the best novels ever!

The Help

books by Mary Higgins Clark

You now have enough suggestions to keep you reading for a couple of years.

St Paul was much older than 40 when he advised his readers to think about ‘whatever is beautiful, good, noble, honourable and excellent’. Gratuitous and graphic descriptions of sex are none of these things.

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