Fight Superstition Now!


#1

Hola:
how do you guys fight superstition, do you chalenge your friends to drop salt or do something that “is bad luck”???
please write to news papers that please stop puting horoscopes.

this is getting everywhere so join the crusade.


#2

[quote=miguel delgado]Hola:
how do you guys fight superstition, do you chalenge your friends to drop salt or do something that “is bad luck”???
please write to news papers that please stop puting horoscopes.

this is getting everywhere so join the crusade.
[/quote]

How about all those silly e-mails I get that say: “Send this to (x-amount) of friends, and your wish will come true!!!”

How gullible- which, by the way the Holy Bible says is a curse (gulliblity).

STOP PASSING ON THESE SUPERSTITIOUS E-MAILS, NOW!!!

Amen


#3

i did not post more examples of superstition because they change from town to town, everyone knows what must be fought in your own cities, just remember the cathesism articles #2110 to 2117 (and more)


#4

Superstition is a sin against the first commandment,“I am the Lord your God; you shall not have other gods besides me.” These sins include putting your faith in rabbits’ feet, charms, horoscopes, crystals, mascots, idolizing brand names, etc, (the list goes on).

Parents need to teach children while young not to get swept up in the current fads that consume young people. I teach my Catechism class about false idols. For most of them, it comes as a surprise that these things are sins.


#5

I had a friend that was very superstitious…I laughed at her all the time, I used to torture her with it to prove nothing would happen.
Here are some of the thing she believed,

Can’t walk under a ladder…Not to read anothers horoscope…
Say “bread and Butter” whenever you are with a friend and get separated by a partition (she was constantly saying bread and butter at the mall because I’d look for partitions)…the salt thing

I was never able to convince her otherwise, her mother taught her these things, she was a little crazy. We were children and I’ve lost touch. I can only hope she let these go.


#6

[quote=Lillith]…Can’t walk under a ladder…
[/quote]

Whether or not some people believe some things superstitiously, some superstitions are sensible habits which I would not disuade people from following whatever their motives. Avoiding walking under ladders is one such. Bumping a ladder even gently (which is often difficult to avoid when walking under a ladder) could cause objects set high on the ladder to fall on the person walking beneath, which could be dangerous depending on the particular object and the distance fallen. If a person is on the ladder and the ladder is not adequately secured, bumping the ladder could cause that person to fall.

Other superstitions do not necessarily represent dangers to be avoided, but merely ways to avoid waste. If you avoid breaking mirrors or spilling salt you don’t need to by new mirrors or salt as often. This may not seem significant today when smooth glass and edible salt are cheap, easily available comodities, but in times past these were expensive and not readily available in many areas.

Others superstitions are just plain silly, as far as I can tell, such as the superstition about beating your garbage cans if the newspaper lands on your stoop with a photograph facing up. But If people want to do this, what authority do I have to prevent them?


#7

[quote=miguel delgado]Hola:
how do you guys fight superstition, do you chalenge your friends to drop salt or do something that “is bad luck”???
please write to news papers that please stop puting horoscopes.

this is getting everywhere so join the crusade.
[/quote]

I think the kind of superstition miguel is talking about is more than walking under ladders or breaking mirrors. There are a lot of people in this country (especially around Hispanic and Carribean immigrant communities) that mix their nominal Catholicism with superstitious beliefs such as Curanderas (witch doctors as opposed to traditional healers), voodoo, and Santeria. All of these are Satanic and anti-Christian and need to be purged from the Church through a massive catechetical effort. In our parish, where we have a large Hispanic membership, we recently had a two part presentation on Santeria. I don’t know how well it was attended, but it’s the kind of thing that needs to be provided.


#8

This is a very important distinction. Thank you.


#9

[quote=Fidelis]I think the kind of superstition miguel is talking about is more than walking under ladders or breaking mirrors. There are a lot of people in this country (especially around Hispanic and Carribean immigrant communities) that mix their nominal Catholicism with superstitious beliefs such as Curanderas (witch doctors as opposed to traditional healers), voodoo, and Santeria. All of these are Satanic and anti-Christian and need to be purged from the Church through a massive catechetical effort. In our parish, where we have a large Hispanic membership, we recently had a two part presentation on Santeria. I don’t know how well it was attended, but it’s the kind of thing that needs to be provided.
[/quote]

I think you are right…much more important! However, the original post is

[quote=Miguel delgado] how do you guys fight superstition, do you chalenge your friends to drop salt or do something that “is bad luck”???
please write to news papers that please stop puting horoscopes.
[/quote]


#10

I don’t necessarily think it’s a huge problem, unless you actively believe that those things will have some sort of actual effect on the outcome.

As for walking under ladders, I walked under a ladder literally about 300 times this summer (i was painting). I don’t believe in superstition.

Things like playing with a ‘magic 8-ball’ and all that i used to do when i was a kid. I don’t think it had anything to do with thinking the object could channel a power, more like seeing how often coincidences occurred. Mindless fun, really.


#11

I think you are right…much more important! However, the original post is

Originally Posted by Miguel delgado
how do you guys fight superstition, do you chalenge your friends to **drop salt ** or do something that “is bad luck”???
please write to news papers that please stop puting horoscopes

.
“Dropping salt” is a common Curandera curse. When a female friend of mine started seriously dating a certain young man, his mother, who was into this sort of thing, was against their relationship. She was caught trying to spread salt on a place where she knew my friend would sit. By this means she hoped to render my friend infertile.

The problem with things like horoscopes (and Oujia boards and Tarot cards, for that matter), usually thought of as innocent and silly, are chiefly dangerous as they serve as an entre into more serious types of the occult. Seen it happen lots of times.


#12

[quote=Fidelis]I think the kind of superstition miguel is talking about is more than walking under ladders or breaking mirrors. There are a lot of people in this country (especially around Hispanic and Carribean immigrant communities) that mix their nominal Catholicism with superstitious beliefs such as Curanderas (witch doctors as opposed to traditional healers), voodoo, and Santeria. All of these are Satanic and anti-Christian and need to be purged from the Church through a massive catechetical effort. In our parish, where we have a large Hispanic membership, we recently had a two part presentation on Santeria. I don’t know how well it was attended, but it’s the kind of thing that needs to be provided.
[/quote]

GOOD POINT… But i am speaking of all the superstitions, from ladders and salt to tarot, chain leters, and santeria, ALL OF THOSE BELIVES ARE SLOWLY BUT SURELY TAKING GRIP…BY THE WAY, HOW MANY PSICHIC LINES (1800) DOES THE US HAVE??? in Mexico there are more than 50 and we are 80% population catholic.


#13

[quote=Ianjo99]I don’t necessarily think it’s a huge problem, unless you actively believe that those things will have some sort of actual effect on the outcome.

As for walking under ladders, I walked under a ladder literally about 300 times this summer (i was painting). I don’t believe in superstition.

Things like playing with a ‘magic 8-ball’ and all that i used to do when i was a kid. I don’t think it had anything to do with thinking the object could channel a power, more like seeing how often coincidences occurred. Mindless fun, really.
[/quote]

thats cool, but how many of your friends do belive in tarot and limpias and they think they are in sinc with the church i known people that go to mass and then when it is over go to the psiquic reader for some advice. i am up to here of that and i will spread the word out TAROT AND HOROSCOPES (and the rest of that mumbo jumbo stuff) ARE A SIN.


#14

I wouldn’t disagree that they are a sin, though I think the severity of the sin is lessened by the fact that many of these people who read into these things in order to accurately predict anything probably aren’t exactly the most knowledgable or deeply in sync with the Church to begin with.

If you look at psychics and tarot card readers etc. their biggest demographic are teenage girls who flock to one trendy religion after another and bored middle age housewives. Not that their salvation is less important by any means, though their commitment may be questionable. Most of these things pass off as trends, and I think you are dramatizing the whole problem.

Like I said though, with your main points I don’t disagree.


#15

[quote=Ianjo99]I wouldn’t disagree that they are a sin, though I think the severity of the sin is lessened by the fact that many of these people who read into these things in order to accurately predict anything probably aren’t exactly the most knowledgable or deeply in sync with the Church to begin with.

If you look at psychics and tarot card readers etc. their biggest demographic are teenage girls who flock to one trendy religion after another and bored middle age housewives. Not that their salvation is less important by any means, though their commitment may be questionable. Most of these things pass off as trends, and I think you are dramatizing the whole problem.

Like I said though, with your main points I don’t disagree.
[/quote]

answer me these: if you see a catholic in that trend (tarot, psychics etc) because is bored will you help her out or just let her go to hell and keep on with your life???

I WILL NOT BECAUSE IT IS NOT MY STILE TO KEEP IT QUIET.


#16

Well let’s see, if I saw one of my Catholic friends doing that, I would ask them if they thought that it was real.

I’m guessing you’re going to say that this hypothetical person would say ‘yes’, so…

From there, depending on how well I knew the person, I would tell them how fake it is and how illogical it truly is from both a Catholic and secular perspective.

If they didn’t believe me after that, then I would tell them that they really need to look into what they believe and why. It would relate to what they believe at the core.

And I’m not saying that it’s not sinful, I am saying that one doesn’t need to start a “personal crusade” to fight it.

My entire point was that few truly believe in it other than as “entertainment” really. Those who do are probably just in confusion about their belief system and need at least a gentle reminder, not a full-blown crusade to stop it.

And your “style” may not be as effective as just laughing it off while letting them know it goes against what they should do.


#17

I do not believe in superstitious things, witchcraft, tarot readings, ouija boards and such - however . . .

I do catch myself saying “knock on wood” if I say “I’m not sick yet, or I have not had that happen yet” -something of that nature.

Not that I believe knocking on wood will prevent something from happening. It is just a phrase I picked up on as a child and do not really think about when I say it.


#18

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