Figure in Rosenberg Case Admits Spying for Soviets

Ever since he was tried and convicted with Julius and Ethel Rosenberg on espionage charges in 1951, Morton Sobell has maintained his innocence.

Until now. In an interview on Thursday, Mr. Sobell, who served nearly 19 years in Alcatraz and other federal prisons, admitted for the first time that he had been a Soviet spy. And he implicated his fellow defendant, Julius Rosenberg, in a conspiracy that delivered to the Soviets vital classified military information and what the American government claimed was the secret to the atomic bomb.

nytimes.com/2008/09/12/nyregion/12spy.html?ex=1378872000&en=c07e5f36ab5a4417&ei=5124&partner=permalink&exprod=permalink

The apparent attempt by the author of the article to dismiss the seriousness of espionage by claiming that the secrets and plans passed along “were of little value to the Soviets, who had already gleaned much of it from other sources.” is troublesome to me.

The Rosenburg case was very serious. Minimizing their treason because, unknown to them, the information they were passing may have had “little value” is just wrong.

It was a time that mainly, IMHO, spoke to consolidation of power. The communists were wrong…we turned out to be correct. Howevr, spying was, and is, rampant on all sides.

Unfortunately, this information is terribly dated, in modern terms, and so is the enemy. Now, if we can figure a good way to spy on Islamic extremists.

John

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