Finding Jesus in London

A Christian awakening in London?

[quote=the article]HTB’s success stems from its ability to foster a sense of community in its youthful participants, says Gumbel. It may also be able to openly discuss issues with which Britain’s famously stuffy elite remain uncomfortable. Even in cases were all material wants are met, Gumbel says, there remains a “spiritual hunger” among London’s wealthy youth. “No matter how nice your house or car is, there’s something missing,” he says. “If you go to the pub and ask what the meaning of life is, people will just laugh at you. But if you can find a group of people who are like you, and want to discuss these questions, it can be a profound experience.”
[/quote]

Good for them! Such questions and longings are part of our human nature - I’m glad they are finding answers. :slight_smile:

This is fantastic! :smiley:

Good to hear! Its always nice to hear cheerful news.

It all really depends on how you look at it all, I expect.

[quote=Kaninchen’s article]But the Church of England has rejected the figures, saying they were incomplete and ignored new ways of worshipping outside the church network.]
[/quote]

Studies suggest figures for Sunday attendance represent only 58 per cent of the number of people who attend in an average month. Attendance at Church of England cathedral services has been growing , while church groups have attracted new congregations by holding meetings in venues such as pubs or at car boot sales.

See, the key to future growth is to hold services on weekdays in pubs. :wink:

Well… erm… or something.

In the first article, the success at Holy Trinity Brompton seems related to the increased sense of community. Breaking out of tradition seems involved in church growth in the second story. Are these related?

Flies in the face of the English ‘thing’ about never talking about ‘politics or religion’ in the pub - almost as bad a faux pas as talking to a stranger on a train (or ever)!

In the first article, the success at Holy Trinity Brompton seems related to the increased sense of community. Breaking out of tradition seems involved in church growth in the second story. Are these related?

Perhaps it’s a phenomenon related to breaking down the alienation and loneliness that surrounds so many in modern societies - bit like the central function of the English pub, of course.

How do they work out these statistics? Because they all say something different. I live in the UK, and I really don’t believe those statistics at all. When I last went to Church, nearly all the seats were filled, and I go to a fairly big Cathedral!

The Guardian is the newspaper of hand wringing liberal atheism however, so you wouldn’t expect them to be flogging a positive Christian tag line now would you! :wink:

Don’t blame me, blame the Bible Society.

When I last went to Church, nearly all the seats were filled, and I go to a fairly big Cathedral!

Depends on when you last went to church and whether the Poles had turned up yet! :stuck_out_tongue:

Seriously, though, I’m not taking any pleasure in it - it’s just that I read the op after I’d done my Sunday skim though the Observer/Telegraph/Times and it seemed apposite.

I’ll have to keep a look out for the Daily Mail to say something (sorry, no, I’m not masochist enough for that).

James Mumford is a well-dressed 27-year-old from the posh London neighborhood of Pimlico.

I did have to laugh at the description of Pimlico as posh! It’s like every other area of London, a mixture of posh and downright plebby!:slight_smile:

I noticed this appears to be taking place in an Anglican church. My biggest concern after reading the article is, is this the gay Anglican Church or the traditional Anglican Church?

<><

As apostasy increases during these times, so too, does the Lord’s outpouring of grace to all men in order that they may be saved.

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.