Fine Points


#1

hey
couple of fine points ive been wondering about:

  1. why do we call church “Mass”, i understand the other proper names “The Holy Sacrafice”, etc, but never got the Mass part
  2. was Jesus actually born on December 25th? or is that just a number we picked a long time ago so everyone would be on the same page…

#2

Mass is a ceremony (a sacrifice) . We celebrate the birth of Christ not the birthDAY of Christ on 12/25!


#3

I have the same question. Why is it called Mass? What is the etymology (sp?) of that word?


#4

thankyou for your reply auhsoj88, but you did not even come close to answering my question, you made it sound like i know nothing. i put the title as fine points, because i want fine points, not pointless phrases. why do we call it “MASS” where did we get the name, what does it mean, etc. and i know what we are celebrating on christmas, but why Dec 25? is that the day he was born?
thanx


#5

[quote=jax8686]thankyou for your reply auhsoj88, but you did not even come close to answering my question, you made it sound like i know nothing. i put the title as fine points, because i want fine points, not pointless phrases. why do we call it “MASS” where did we get the name, what does it mean, etc. and i know what we are celebrating on christmas, but why Dec 25? is that the day he was born?
thanx
[/quote]

We don’t know His actual birthdate. December 25 was chosen to replace a pagan holiday I think.


#6

For the first question. Try this for the Mass part about halfway down the page:

newadvent.org/cathen/09790b.htm

Hope this helps. Thanks and God Bless.


#7

I believe the word “Mass” comes from the dismissal: “Ite Missa Est”


#8

[quote=atsheeran]I believe the word “Mass” comes from the dismissal: “Ite Missa Est”
[/quote]

Ok, so what does Missa mean? The translation to “Ita Missa est” simply says “The Mass is over” in my missal.


#9

ok, mass comes from Missa, which was part of dismissal, and like confession, communion, baptism, etc, the word was generalized for the whole celebration, rather than just the individual part


#10

Ok, so what does Missa mean? The translation to “Ita Missa est” simply says “The Mass is over” in my missal.

Well, Ite seems clear enough (go), but I think there could be argument over what “missa est” means. Anyone want to pin it down? Is there a word missing there or what?

I mean, I know we all all know it is the dismissal, but what is the precise meaning? It could be a you are sent or something. Anyone know exactly?


#11

[quote=Genesis315]I have the same question. Why is it called Mass? What is the etymology (sp?) of that word?
[/quote]

from the final dismissal in Latin, ita missa est, the Mass is ended, go in peace, the same root word - missa/dismissal/mission. It means we are sent to love and serve the world, the evangelize. The worship due God and participation in the one sacrifice of Jesus Christ has as its end the sending forth of every baptized Christian to witness the truth of the Gospel and to evangelize by preaching, love and service.


#12

Interestingly, its literal meaning doesn’t really make much sense.

Ite Missa Est


#13

[quote=jax8686]hey
couple of fine points ive been wondering about:

  1. why do we call church “Mass”, i understand the other proper names “The Holy Sacrafice”, etc, but never got the Mass part
  2. was Jesus actually born on December 25th? or is that just a number we picked a long time ago so everyone would be on the same page…
    [/quote]

It is as someone pointed out from the English translation of “ite missa est” The last words of the Latin, loosly translated as “the Assembly is dismissed” the “Mass” is the public prayer of the assembly or Church. Mass is simply an English shorthand for what is properly called the Divine Liturgy.


#14

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