Firefly (the show): what do people see in it?

[quote="jilly4ski, post:8, topic:226543"]
I like Firefly. But I am not really the traditional SF fan. I did watch the entire Star Trek Voyager series and loved it, but have not seen more than a few episodes of the other star treks and have never seen BSG or Babylon 5.

I enjoyed the characters. Jayne was fun though not my favorite, Wash is the comedian, Zoe is just awesome, Mal is a mystery/cowboy, Inara is sophisticated but on that ****** ship, and Kylee always sees the upside. I guess I really liked the ensemble nature and how they interacted.

I thought most of the dialogue was witty/sarcastic with a dry sense of humor that I enjoy.

Also, I liked the premise of a space western, kind of like the anime Cowboy Bebop.

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I gotta say, I like Morena Bacarrin. For some reason, she's cast as a villainness: her roles as Adria, late of the Ori and former Orici, on Stargate SG-1 and as Anna on V. It was nice to see her in another role, even if it is as a Companion.

[quote="Dtmccameron, post:11, topic:226543"]
"Psychic? That sounds like something out of science fiction!"
"You live on a space ship, dear..."
"So?"

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I actually rage whenever this exchange is mentioned. To characters in a 26th century setting where spaceships are so cheap Mal has one, they are not a part of science fiction. Do we call "flying machines" a part of science fiction? No. They were, you know, in the 19th century—but then airplanes became commonplace. It's doubtful a 26th-century society would even have "science fiction" as we understand it (it'd probably morph into something along the lines of medieval "travelers' tales").

This really should be the basics of the basics, for an SF writer, but Whedon simply isn't one.

[quote="Pug, post:15, topic:226543"]
First, it is not sci-fi, so any points about hyper-drive realities or whatnot are irrelevant.

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Not sci-fi? How not? The minute you got people flying between planets on spaceships we don't have, it's sci-fi. Not sure what you mean by hyper-drive realities; the series doesn't seem to have hyperdrive, though they appear to have some kind of faster-than-light communication (since they do interplanetary calls in real time).

[quote="YankeeRC, post:16, topic:226543"]
I have to agree its a space western.

Star Trek, the original series was a kiddie cowboy serial set in Space, Battlestar Galactica (original) was considered Wagon Train in space by Lorne Green (Col. Adama). Space Above and Beyond another great show cut short after 2 seasons by FOX was a war movie set in space. And likewise Firefly was pretty much a spaghetti western set in space, a Magnificent Seven or Good, Bad and Ugly like alliance of unlikely heroes.

I was personally convinced the Captain/Mal character in Firely so much resembled the personality of Capt. Han Solo I viewed each episode of Firefly almost as if watching the continuing Adventures of Han Solo without Chewbacca.:D

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:eek:

Space Above and Beyond was a great, and very underrated, show! It was just getting interesting when the series was taken off the air. :eek:

[quote="The_Wanderer, post:23, topic:226543"]
Space Above and Beyond was a great, and very underrated, show! It was just getting interesting when the series was taken off the air.

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I've heard good things about S: A&B; isn't that the one with the genetically-engineered second-class citizens?

One thing that occurred to me is, Firefly fans who also like first-person shooters really ought to play Halo 3: ODST. I actually started liking Firefly more after Buck, Dutch, and Mickey, voiced by the gents who played Mal, Jayne, and Wash—and Mickey is a pilot, just like Wash (the best part is when he steals an alien ship: "Console reads green across the board. Well, purple.") Also I think they let Adam Baldwin have more control over his character; he's religious in a sort of "rough soldier-man" kind of way (and, according to various sources, happily married, which ain't like Jayne). Baldwin (who's not one of those Baldwins) is some manner of Evangelical, see.

I realized, actually, thinking about it, that I don't really mind Firefly's characters much, at least the male ones (Whedon's female characters are all insufferable Mary Sues, especially Kaylee—and I've had a thing for Jewel Staite since I saw her in "Space Cases" when I was twelve and she was fourteen, so it takes work to make me hate her character).

I just hate the setting. There is absolutely no work on the thing. If the Alliance could do that scale of terraforming, the Independents might as well have been fist-fighting the Mighty Thor. I have elsewhere compared the necessary technology to Niven's Pak Protectors, or the Forerunners from Halo.

That Companion houses are apparently part Buddhist temple needs some explaining, since in the real world all Buddhist monks have vows of chastity—and some of the things she says sound like that old, demonstrably false chestnut that Asian religions have the same sexual mores as the post-modern West.

And why do all the props that aren't specifically 19th century, look like they came off a shelf in Target?

Then there's the Chinese. Leave to one side that they mangle it atrociously—because apparently Mandarin coaching would break their budget!—all their profanity is based on Western concepts of cussing. Profanity works completely differently in Chinese; there's a lot less sex and religion, and a lot more nudity and death. Admittedly they both use poop, but so does everyone.

[quote="Hastrman, post:22, topic:226543"]
Not sci-fi? How not? The minute you got people flying between planets on spaceships we don't have, it's sci-fi. Not sure what you mean by hyper-drive realities; the series doesn't seem to have hyperdrive, though they appear to have some kind of faster-than-light communication (since they do interplanetary calls in real time).

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It does not appear to be about science. It seems to be space opera, perhaps. By that I mean an adventure set in space, with planets and spaceships and when on the planets, there might be horses. Oh, in the spaceship there might be cows sometimes. :D

By "hyperdrive" I meant to exemplify whatever techno-jargon was inserted in the script to suit the moment. The technology in a space adventure is not typically expected to fit with known science or capabilities. Galaxy Quest spoofed that so well with the chompy-mashy things with bursting flames in the middle of the spaceship.

The thing that seems the most like sci-fi to me is the origin of the reavers. It represents a judgment about certain ways people behave. I found it lightly treated, though, so I didn't consider it as a serious comment about anything. Maybe my problem is that if it is too light, I can't see it as real sci-fi.

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