First traditional rite tips?


#1

So on Monday I attended my first Mass and as I have said in other posts I enjoyed it. The priest invited me to the traditional rite tomorrow night. I just wanted to ask if anyone had any tips, I'm guessing it will be just observe but anything would be appreciated.


#2

[quote="marcaevans, post:1, topic:317347"]
So on Monday I attended my first Mass and as I have said in other posts I enjoyed it. The priest invited me to the traditional rite tomorrow night. I just wanted to ask if anyone had any tips, I'm guessing it will be just observe but anything would be appreciated.

[/quote]

Don't worry if it all seems strange and diffeent - that's a normal reaction! :-)

Although nearly everything will be in Latin (apart from if the priest reads the Epistle and Gospel in English as well as Latin), don't worry about the responses. Most of the time, it's only the servers who make the responses. In general, I'd just suggest that you go to enjoy it!

Do you know whether it will be a sung Mass or a Low Mass?


#3

[quote="marcaevans, post:1, topic:317347"]
So on Monday I attended my first Mass and as I have said in other posts I enjoyed it. The priest invited me to the traditional rite tomorrow night. I just wanted to ask if anyone had any tips, I'm guessing it will be just observe but anything would be appreciated.

[/quote]

In this awesome 40-minute video Fr. Calvin Goodwin, FSSP, offers a spiritual commentary on the Mass given in real time as a priest celebrates the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite. :)


#4

Sung Mass is a Low Mass.


#5

[quote="marcaevans, post:1, topic:317347"]
So on Monday I attended my first Mass and as I have said in other posts I enjoyed it. The priest invited me to the traditional rite tomorrow night. I just wanted to ask if anyone had any tips, I'm guessing it will be just observe but anything would be appreciated.

[/quote]

My advice for the first few times is not to sit too close to the front. If you sit with people in front of you then you can follow when to kneel, when to stand and when to sit.

You can get a small booklet missal for following the Mass from the LMS. £3.50 plus postage from here :

lms.org.uk/resources/shop/latin-english-booklet-missal

It has the Latin on the left and English on the right so you can understand what is happening. They quite likely will have one in the church you can borrow as well.


#6

Only in a very technical sense. Most Sung Masses today involve incense, and all involve chant and music, so that is not really an accurate description.


#7

[quote="marcaevans, post:1, topic:317347"]
I'm guessing it will be just observe

[/quote]

:thumbsup:

Don't worry about keeping up with all the prayers in your missal the first time. In fact, I wouldn't even use the missal unless you really want to. For most people it takes going several times before they get into the rhythm of things.


#8

[quote="Ad_Orientem, post:7, topic:317347"]
:thumbsup:

Don't worry about keeping up with all the prayers in your missal the first time. In fact, I wouldn't even use the missal unless you really want to. For most people it takes going several times before they get into the rhythm of things.

[/quote]

Yesterday morning I visited a Catholic Church in our town called St Mary Oratory where the Mass was all in Latin. I had never been to a Latin Mass before and felt lost. (What is the difference between a regular Catholic Church and an Oratory?) Also what does a person do if they aren't familiar with a Latin Mass?:shrug: There was no singing by the way.


#9

[quote="Chatter163, post:6, topic:317347"]
Only in a very technical sense. Most Sung Masses today involve incense, and all involve chant and music, so that is not really an accurate description.

[/quote]

It is a perfectly accurate description. It is the sacred ministers that determine whether a Mass is high or low - not the presence of music or incense.


#10

[quote="Spudbynight, post:4, topic:317347"]
Sung Mass is a Low Mass.

[/quote]

Actually, rubric/paragraph 271 of the 1960 code of rubrics states that:

Masses are of two kinds: sung Masses (in cantu) and low Masses (missa Lecta).

A Mass is called a Sung Mass when the celebrant actually sings those parts which the rubrics require to be sung; otherwise it is called a Low Mass.

Morevoer, a sung Mass, when celebrated with the assistance of Sacred Ministers, is called a Solemn or High Mass (Missa solemnis); whenever celebrated without Sacred Ministers it is called a Missa cantata

The above quotation is taken directly from: maternalheart.org/library/1962rubrics.pdf page 51, paragraph 271, if you wish to confirm the accuracy of my statement.

To the OP: whichever form of Mass it is, hope you enjoy it!


#11

[quote="Spudbynight, post:4, topic:317347"]
Sung Mass is a Low Mass.

[/quote]

Not always ;)


#12

[quote="Spudbynight, post:9, topic:317347"]
It is a perfectly accurate description. It is the sacred ministers that determine whether a Mass is high or low - not the presence of music or incense.

[/quote]

Thus a Sung Mass can be Missa Cantata or Missa Solemnis, depending on the absence or presence of sacred ministers (deacon, subdeacon, etc.).


#13

[quote="Spudbynight, post:9, topic:317347"]
It is a perfectly accurate description. It is the sacred ministers that determine whether a Mass is high or low - not the presence of music or incense.

[/quote]

No, the presence of sacred ministers determines if a Mass is Solemn, not High. Under the 1962 missal, High Masses are either Solemn or Sung. The revised 1960 rubrics changed the term Solemn High Mass to just Solemn Mass (Missa Solemnis). This was done to reflect that fact that an indult was no longer needed to have incense at a Missa Cantata, and that more Masses were *"*Simple High Masses, i,.e., Sung Mass..


#14

[quote="Mark1970, post:10, topic:317347"]
Actually, rubric/paragraph 271 of the 1960 code of rubrics states that:

The above quotation is taken directly from: maternalheart.org/library/1962rubrics.pdf page 51, paragraph 271, if you wish to confirm the accuracy of my statement.

To the OP: whichever form of Mass it is, hope you enjoy it!

[/quote]

Sorry - I think I was having a blond moment. You are of course correct and I made a complete pigs ear of making the point I was trying to make.

What I should have said is

Sung Mass isn't a High Mass. (Although a sung Mass may be a High Mass)

[quote="Chatter163, post:13, topic:317347"]
No, the presence of sacred ministers determines if a Mass is Solemn, not High. Under the 1962 missal, High Masses are either Solemn or Sung. The revised 1960 rubrics changed the term Solemn High Mass to just Solemn Mass (Missa Solemnis). This was done to reflect that fact that an indult was no longer needed to have incense at a Missa Cantata, and that more Masses were *"*Simple High Masses, i,.e., Sung Mass..

[/quote]

NO NO NO

;)

Read the rubrics - solemn and high mean the same thing.Link is above :

The point I have been trying to make (badly sometimes) is that a Mass is only a High Mass when a deacon and subdeacon are present (the sacred ministers). The addition of music or incense doesn't make a Mass a High Mass.

In Latin this is called a missa solemnis - in the English language it can be called either a "Solemn Mass" or a "High Mass" both mean the same thing. A "Solemn High Mass" doesn't actually exist although the term is sometimes used incorrectly.

It is amazing how the EF draws out the inner geek in all of us.

:D


#15

[quote="LegoGE1947, post:8, topic:317347"]
Yesterday morning I visited a Catholic Church in our town called St Mary Oratory where the Mass was all in Latin. I had never been to a Latin Mass before and felt lost. (What is the difference between a regular Catholic Church and an Oratory?) Also what does a person do if they aren't familiar with a Latin Mass?:shrug: There was no singing by the way.

[/quote]

Catholic Encyclopedia has a good article on oratories. It's basically a place of prayer set aside by ecclesiastical authority for prayer and the celebration of Mass, but it is not a parish church.

If one is new to the Latin Mass, you can find several videos online that explain what is going on at different times. Most parishes that have the TLM (at least in my experience) have missals that you can pick up in church to follow along. I doubt anyone is able to follow along perfectly the first time they attend the TLM, but if you are familiar with the OF, the order of the EF is very similar, so the transistion is usually not too difficult.


#16

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