For my sake and others, can't we just list some?


#1

I must be either very scrupulous or either too worried about my first Confession of what not to say and what to say to confess.

Wouldn’t it be a good idea to just list some things that are to be said or not so that I and others who aren’t too clear about what to confess can have a better idea and feel relaxed for once?

For example: like you could list you don’t have to confess blinking your eyes. You have to confess lusting at someone, etc.

Actually, a HUGE list would help!


#2

[quote=Paris Blues]I must be either very scrupulous or either too worried about my first Confession of what not to say and what to say to confess.

Wouldn’t it be a good idea to just list some things that are to be said or not so that I and others who aren’t too clear about what to confess can have a better idea and feel relaxed for once?

For example: like you could list you don’t have to confess blinking your eyes. You have to confess lusting at someone, etc.

Actually, a HUGE list would help!
[/quote]

A pretty good checklist of mortal sins (to be confessed) and venial sins/imperfections (do not need to be confessed but it is recommended to do so) can be found at website:

www.catholic.org/frz/examen/mortal_main.htm

Once you finish reading the mortal sins you can click on venial sins. This site also gives tips on how to make a good confession.


#3

[quote=Paris Blues]I must be either very scrupulous or either too worried about my first Confession of what not to say and what to say to confess.

Wouldn’t it be a good idea to just list some things that are to be said or not so that I and others who aren’t too clear about what to confess can have a better idea and feel relaxed for once?

For example: like you could list you don’t have to confess blinking your eyes. You have to confess lusting at someone, etc.

Actually, a HUGE list would help!
[/quote]

I have struggled with srupulocity in the past and really, such a list will only increase your struggle with scrupuloscity. I would suggest telling your priest that you are scrupulous. Then when you go to confession with him, he will be able to help you in the confessional. BUT YOU MUST DO EVERYTHING HE SAYS if he is a good and orthodox priest. If he tells you your confession is finished, then it is finished. Even if you don’t think so. If he tells you not to confess something, then you must not confess it. If he tells you that you must go to communion, then you must go to communion, regaurdless of whether or not you agree. This is the only way to overcome scrupulocity. My suggestion for a person with scrupulocity is to only confess those things that you are 100% sure and would swear on a bible that they are mortal sins. Otherwise, don’t confess it. In most people’s cases they should confess if they are not sure about a particular sin. But in the case of the scrupulous person, this can make matters worse, and it would be a shame to see scrupuloscity destroy a person’s spiritual life. Therefore, you situation is unique and should be treated uniquely. TELL YOUR PRIEST HOW SCRUPULOUS YOU ARE IN CONFESSION, AND THEN DO EVERYTHING HE TELLS YOU TO DO. But make sure your confessor is both orthodox and loving.


#4

[quote=Topher]I have struggled with srupulocity in the past and really, such a list will only increase your struggle with scrupuloscity. I would suggest telling your priest that you are scrupulous. Then when you go to confession with him, he will be able to help you in the confessional. BUT YOU MUST DO EVERYTHING HE SAYS if he is a good and orthodox priest. If he tells you your confession is finished, then it is finished. Even if you don’t think so. If he tells you not to confess something, then you must not confess it. If he tells you that you must go to communion, then you must go to communion, regaurdless of whether or not you agree. This is the only way to overcome scrupulocity. My suggestion for a person with scrupulocity is to only confess those things that you are 100% sure and would swear on a bible that they are mortal sins. Otherwise, don’t confess it. In most people’s cases they should confess if they are not sure about a particular sin. But in the case of the scrupulous person, this can make matters worse, and it would be a shame to see scrupuloscity destroy a person’s spiritual life. Therefore, you situation is unique and should be treated uniquely. TELL YOUR PRIEST HOW SCRUPULOUS YOU ARE IN CONFESSION, AND THEN DO EVERYTHING HE TELLS YOU TO DO. But make sure your confessor is both orthodox and loving.
[/quote]

I think he’s Catholic, not Orthodox.


#5

The problem with listing sins, Paris, is that a person’s culpability may be different. Somone may not realize that x is a sin, and may not be culpable to the same degree- it may not be mortal for them whereas it may be for me. Do your best, and your confessor will help you.


#6

[quote=Paris Blues]I think he’s Catholic, not Orthodox.
[/quote]

I wasn’t using “Orthodox” with a capital “O”. I was using orthodox with a lower case “o” which simply means having correct belief. So let me clafiy, when I refer to an orthodox priest, I am talking about a good Catholic priest that follows and believes all of the teachings of the Catholic Church and is loyal to the pope in Rome. When I refer to an Orthodox priest with a capital “O” I am refering to a priest in the Schismatic Churches of the east that do not submitt to the rightful authority of the Pope. So let’s review, an orthodox priest with a lower case “o” is a good Catholic priest of either the western or eastern rites that is union with the Catholic Church, that accepts all the teachings of the Catholic Church, and submitts to the authority of the Pope.
And by the way, congratulations on you conversion. I am so happy that you are coming home to the Church established by Jesus Christ. I will be praying and rejoicing for you. God bless.


#7

Nicole,

I am so happy to see you coming into the Church! Congratulations!

Don’t worry so much. If you have a good orthodox priest (and Topher is right—when a small “o” is used in front of Catholic it’s usually understood as an adjective, while the big “O”, Orthodox, is a name, a noun) can give you some guidance. Don’t worry: these guys know what to do even if you’ve got a case of “newbie nerves” or an inclination to scrupulosity.

There are “examination of conscience” booklets around—if you have a Catholic bookstore nearby, you can take a look. If you suffer from scrupulosity, just be careful and don’t tie yourself into knots. Relax.


#8

[quote=Sherlock]Nicole,

I am so happy to see you coming into the Church! Congratulations!

Don’t worry so much. If you have a good orthodox priest (and Topher is right—when a small “o” is used in front of Catholic it’s usually understood as an adjective, while the big “O”, Orthodox, is a name, a noun) can give you some guidance. Don’t worry: these guys know what to do even if you’ve got a case of “newbie nerves” or an inclination to scrupulosity.

There are “examination of conscience” booklets around—if you have a Catholic bookstore nearby, you can take a look. If you suffer from scrupulosity, just be careful and don’t tie yourself into knots. Relax.
[/quote]

Thanks!

Now I just want to know why saying “orthodox” is really necessary because it kind of confuses me with the real Orthodox religion! I always think, no, I need a Catholic priest, not an orthodox! Do you see what I mean? Sorry about that but it does get me clueless! :stuck_out_tongue:


#9

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