For Non-Catholics, why not join RCIA today and become Catholic?

I’m just really curious as to the actually reason(s) people have for not becoming Catholic.

What specifically is keeping you away from the Church Christ established on St. Peter the Apostle? The Catholic Church.

In light of the wealth of Biblical and Historical proofs which clearly show that the Roman Catholic Church is the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church, why do people stay out of her?

I’d like to hear from you Non-Catholics. Thanks!

Hi Monica,

I think my first post in
this thread gives my reasons :wink:

Cheers!

Please be charitable. Some non-Catholic Christians believe they are a part of the one true Church (whatever church they belong to). Others aren’t Catholic for a number of reasons. We must pray for them, and we can gently correct them, as it is a work of charity and mercy.

I actually attended RCIA classes at my wife’s parish several years ago, although I chose not to convert. For one thing, I was discouraged by that very course: the facilitator taught some things about Catholic teaching which just weren’t true, and several important things were omitted. I don’t think he had any evil plot to trick people, probably he was just poorly trained and working without adequate oversight. As for why I’m not Catholic, I’d prefer not to get into that here.

It’s not as easy as walking into the local parish, signing up on the roll sheet and taking communion all in the same day. That’s what your post seems to imply. It’s not that easy.

Everybody has their reasons - personal, theological and everything in-between. I just think it’s naive to present it as an easy process for those who want to convert.

I’m a convert, but I needed every last second of the 17 years that it took me to come into the Church. (And I probably could have used another year, in addition to that, too, since I was still unprepared for certain things when they came up, and I still felt “rushed.”)

I think that everyone should become Catholic, but nobody should rush the process. (Or delay it unduly, either - but rushing is bad.)

Monica,
I am speculating that you are a cradle Catholic. There are sooo many things, not even related to doctrine, that make conversion difficult - a serious, life-changing, overwhelming decision. Sounds like you really care about people - never stop doing that.
Thanks,
Jon

It is as easy as walking into a local parish and signing up for RCIA. I never implied anything about receiving the Most Holy Eucharist the same day.

It is any easy process to convert. I should know. I am a convert. I converted 14 years ago.

I realize that everyone has their reasons which is why I am asking Non-Catholics what their actual reasons are.

Hi Jon,

I am a convert to the Catholic Church 14 years ago.

I realize that there are a whole host of reasons why someone would choose to stay out of the Catholic Church and I’d like to know the reasons of people here on the Catholic Answers forums who are Non-Catholic.

I speculated wrong. :o
Jon

I’ve re-read my question to see if there is anything that could be taken as uncharitable and still find nothing. I apologize if my question offends you or anyone else.

You are one of only 2 Non-Catholics who have posted here. I appreciate the post and am sorry you prefer not to discuss why you’ve chosen to remain outside of the Catholic Church as that is my curiousity.

I hope nothing but the best for you!

I do not believe that the “wealth of Biblical and historical proofs” are as compelling as those who have joined the Catholic church do.

I have found a faith in Christ that has answered my deepest needs. I do not believe in exchanging what I consider to be freedom in Christ for bondage to creeds and dogma. I do not believe I require any one to act on my behalf before God by conducting rituals…Christ has taken the place of Priest for me and in Him I share in His priesthood to approach God without the need for someone else “confecting” or “performing” a “sacrament” on my behalf.

I share with all believers in Christ our common Lord, Faith and Baptism…“faith” isn’t what one believes…faith is how one lives…it is not a set of doctrines and dogmas…but a way of life that incarnates the Risen One into our world.

For those who have found strength and solace in the CC, I rejoice with you.

Ok, I am Lutheran - born into a Lutheran pastor’s family - now in my mid-50s. I was never taught hostility against the Catholic Church (Dad would have never stood for it). But I was raised a Lutheran, so doctrinally here are some things.

  1. Primacy and Power of the Pope
  2. Doctrine on justification
  3. Sacrifice of the Mass (as meriting to us)
  4. purgatory
    Anything else probaably relates to these. I am currently in the process (as are our communions) of sorting these out.

Jon

Really? That wasn’t my experience. I know you didn’t imply taking the Eucharist in the same day. It wasn’t meant to be taken literally. The way your post was written made it appear that simple. It was a metaphor.

It is any easy process to convert. I should know. I am a convert. I converted 14 years ago.

And do you suppose your experience is normal for all people? I have children and a wife. My conversion, wanting to raise the children Catholic, battles with my wife and a host of other issues have made it difficult. I went to see the RCIA director, saw the pastor, went to mass, discussed with my wife - did all the things I was supposed to.

My marriage was in jeopardy and it wasn’t easy. On top of the personal reasons, I wanted to be able to take my vows seriously and fully submit to the authority of the Pope and the Church on *every *single issue. That part I still find difficult. I don’t want to be a cafeteria Catholic. If and when I convert it’s gonna be all the way.

I realize that everyone has their reasons which is why I am asking Non-Catholics what their actual reasons are.

I guess my reluctance to take the thread as a truly curious inquiry is suspect given how it was presented and the general attitude in this section which seems to label all non-Catholics as lazy, rebellious people who don’t really care about converting.

Interesting indeed! You are a Catholic, but have left the faith. I’ve heard that the mark of Baptism, and the other Sacraments, is a mark which remains on our souls for all eternity. I’ve heard that “Once a Catholic, always a Catholic”.

Nevertheless, your reasons briefly include:

  1. Evil in the world
  2. Many different religions that don’t agree with each other and people within the same religion often don’t agree with each other
  3. The God of the Bible is too small

Responses:

  1. Evil in the world, how can God allow things to bad things to happen? (serial killers, hurricanes, etc.?) Valid question. When Adam and Eve sinned, that Original Sin tainted not only human souls, but all of creation. No bad thing that ever happened is a result of God’s Will, but it is caused by sin through human being’s Free Will. All of creation was in need of a Savior, not just humanity for our eternal salvation. Creation is still tainted by the affects of sin as are human beings, yet salvation is completely possible if we accept Christ and His Church and obey Him and His Church. Free Will is a gift of God and we can choose to use it wisely and rightly or to use it for evil intents and purposes. The choice is ours and our choice has eternal consequences and our choice not only affects us but world entire.

  2. Many different religions are through out the world because everyone is created with a spiritual hole that can only be filled with the One True God. Each person recognizes that our existence and the existence of all things has a source. Every people, tribe, nation that has existed has always looked for an explanation of who/what that Source is. Their various explanations have been the establishment of many different religions and theologies. Because of all of the confusion and man’s fallen state, Christ, who is the 2nd person of the Most Holy Trinity the Eternal God, came to Earth to reveal Himself to us directly. He established the Church for us to follow as the path towards our salvation and theosis. He taught us what it truly means to be “human” by taking humanity onto Himself. Other religions aren’t anywhere close and then some religions are very close to the Truth, but all are lacking in some way in their understanding of the One True God except the religion which Christ Himself established, the Catholic Church. Those of us, who are able to reason have a duty to investigate the claims of the Catholic Church and have a duty to join her for the good of our souls and the good of humanity and the good of all creation. As far as people of a same religion disagreeing, we have to understand that because sin is in the world, it affects our judgement and understanding and only by completely purifying ourselves of sin can we truly have union with God and other people, which is the ultimate goal of salvation, until then there will be descent. We are lucky as Catholics to have our entire Faith outlined for us as many religions today vary on their most basic of doctrines, we as Catholics have actual authority in these matters we can turn in: 1. The Magestarium 2. The Traditions 3. The Bible. There are still individual Catholics who disagree with the Church on various matters and this is due to their sinful souls, may God bless them and grant them understanding.

  3. God is too small - perhaps you are misunderstanding the God which has been revealed to us in the Bible, through the Magestarium and through the Saints. God has No beginning, He alone creates out of Nothing, No One comes close to God. There exists no place where God is not. He continuously sustains our very existence. God is Eternal Love. Not only did He create us and everything around us, visible and invisible, after we as a human race in Adam and Eve rejected Him, He humbled Himself, taking on our flesh as His own in order to save us from our sinful state, in order to elevate us once again to our pre-original sin existence, but even more than that to show us that we are called to become like He Himself Is. St. Athanasius “God became Man so that man could become god”. Only a Gigantic God has the ability to do all that! And or what purpose…LOVE.

Maybe this helps, maybe not? Peace and blessings to you!

For me, it came down to two things, once I “got” that the Church is One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic.

The verse where Jesus says to Peter, “He who hears you, hears me,” and then that list of the Popes going back to Peter. I mean, at first I thought that list was all made up - until I started reading the Early Fathers, and seeing where, for example, St. Irenaeus, writing long before there could have been any sort of “agenda” with regard to that list, starts rapping off the first set of names that are on it - at that point I had another “AHA” moment, and said, “Yeah, okay - yeah. The Pope is real. And Jesus really did promise him that he’d be infallible - in so many words, at least.”

But none of thiscan possibly make any sense, until you work out how it’s going to go with your family, and your current church, and that, for me, was the really slow part.

Detaching from my family’s church community was hard. I don’t think there’s anything harder than that, because they’re your people - your tribe. They’re the ones you’ve known your whole life - they knew you when you were throwing tantrums at the age of two, they remember who taught you how to drink from a straw at the Sunday School picnic. They know absolutely everything there is to know about you, and they love you anyway. That’s hard to beat, and it’s hard to let go of.

Being Catholic is definitely different. There isn’t the same closeness with people. But there are compensations, and there are some wonderful people, who love you in spite of not understanding you at all. Which is also kind of nice. :slight_smile:

You sure have read alot into my question that isn’t there.

I don’t label all non-Catholics as lazy, rebellious people. It didn’t even occur to me to think that.

In psychology, people who read things into what’s not there is usually due transference of their own thoughts or feelings. I will happily assume this is not the case for you.

May God bless you and your journey. I hope your wife will take the obedience part of her vows to you seriously and begin to trust you and your direction of her into the Catholic Church even though she may not yet understand. From what I’ve heard of Scott Hahn’s conversion, this type of situation can and does cause tremendous problems in marriages. A cross to bear. I have just prayed for your marriage.

Blessings to you and your family!

I read what I think is there. That doesn’t mean I’m right.

I don’t label all non-Catholics as lazy, rebellious people. It didn’t even occur to me to think that.

I’m glad it didn’t occur to you, but it sure did occur to me. I specifically referred to this part of the forum and the general attitude towards non-Catholics. I also said that I remain “suspect” of the entire thread altogether. Of course, I could be dishonest or withhold my thoughts on the whole thing. But, I prefer to open.

In psychology, people who read things into what’s not there is usually due transference of their own thoughts or feelings. I will happily assume this is not the case for you.

Psychology. I don’t see how that is relevant here, but I’m glad that you found that field to be enlightening somehow. I was more fascinated in college with child development and adulthood insecurities. I was pretty plain about my assumptions and feelings. I don’t think you had to read between the lines.

May God bless you and your journey. I hope your wife will take the obedience part of her vows to you seriously and begin to trust you and your direction of her into the Catholic Church even though she may not yet understand. From what I’ve heard of Scott Hahn’s conversion, this type of situation can and does cause tremendous problems in marriages. A cross to bear. I have just prayed for your marriage.

Blessings to you and your family!

Thank you. Without pulling any punches, I have to say that I was surprised by your inference about my wife and her obedience to her vows. She didn’t give me an ultimatum, but frankly, I would probably react in a negative way should she single-mindedly decide to convert to what is a “foreign” faith to me and then expect our children to be brought up in it without my involvement.

Sorry, I just think we have a real communication problem. You know how you meet some people and you realize that 5 more minutes with the person and you’d feel like walking away? That’s what I feel now.

God bless you on your journey.

I wish it was that easy.
I am not baptized and arried to a catholic woman, for one year we have attended the church and i am just waiting for me to get baptized but it just delays.
One year is not enough says the priest it must take at least two years and during this time i am studying reading and all that.

Sometimes it really feels hopeless and i wanna go to another church and baptise there to have it done.
The church is not making it easy for the ones who wants to be a part of it.

I got previous marriages which will be declared invalid according to pauline privilege at the time of my baptism so my wife now also is set apart and cant take her communion until that day of baptism.

I have been talking to the priest about this over and over again but nothing happens i am not even counted as a catechumen yet after ONE year, and my wifes daughter is in the first communion classes.

But all the priest says is that God has time and it must take at least 2 years and we must continue to go to mass and so on.

Maybe, but just maybe i will be accepted as a catechumen at ashes wednesday because the priest says it is not so important to be instated as a catechumen or not because God knows what is in your heart.
Maybe he is right but for me it would make a difference as it would for me be a sign that i am progressing.

I was in catechesis classes last summer but after that not very much has happened.
I will not be in RCIA, the parish is small and the priest will himself hold the catechesis and he already knows that im not new to catholic faith.

As he said, you impress me more and more with your knowledge everytime we meet.

Well in my point of view delayance can be both good or bad some need more time and some do not, just because we are rather new in this parish my baptism is delayed and i dont see the reason to delay it more.
It could be done at this easter vigil so we could have our marriage convalidated and also my wife would be in communion with the church again.
But it is the priest who decide he was mentioning to me that maybe 2011 i can be baptised but i guess he forgot the year that already passed, but he always keep on saying that it must take two years.

In my opinion the church should be more flexible, some need more time and others already did the time they need some way or another.

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