Forgiveness of sin without confession and repentence?


#1

I am looking for any verses in the Bible which demonstrate God forgiving sins without a person first confessing them, and/or without repentance. I am not aware of any, but am not a biblical scholar.

Could you please provide any that you are aware of?

Thanks.


#2

one that’s comming to mind is he healed simon peters mother in law with out her doing anything…
i don’t know if healing and forgiving are the same thing but
it says if he heals you the kingdome of heaven has come to you…


#3

The words “Father forgive them, they know not what they do” comes to mind.


#4

We need to remember that Jesus Christ hanging bloody on His cross is God.

Therefore, Jesus knew which “them” were sorry for their sins and seeking forgiveness. Those “them” who did not know “what they do” would not have committed a mortal sin.


#5

We need to read the OPs question, not try to answer something different.

I am looking for any verses in the Bible which demonstrate God forgiving sins without a person first confessing them, and/or without repentance

It’s a good idea to read the question before trying to answer it.


#6

Psalm 19:13 Who can detect trespasses? Cleanse me from my inadvertent sins.

Peace


#7

I am also not a biblical schollar, but I love **John 20:20-23:

**On the evening of that first day of the week, when the doors were locked, where the disciples were, for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood in their midst and said to them, “Peace be with you.” When he had said this, he showed them his hands and his side. The disciples rejoiced when they saw the Lord. (Jesus) said to them again, “Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, so I send you.” And when he had said this, he breathed on them and said to them, “Receive the holy Spirit. Whose sins you forgive are forgiven them, and whose sins you retain are retained.”

In John Chapter 20, Jesus has ALREADY been crucified and resurected. He has now given the authority to forgive sins to the Apostles. LOGIC would command that if the Apostles were going to forgive a sin, mustn’t they need to know what the sins were? If you want a doctor to help you when your sick, mustn’t he need to know what’s wrong with you?

This may also be helpful…

James 5:16 - James clearly teaches us that we must “confess our sins to one another,” not just privately to God. James 5:16 must be read in the context of James 5:14-15, which is referring to the healing power (both physical and spiritual) of the priests of the Church. Hence, when James says “therefore” in verse 16, he must be referring to the men he was writing about in verses 14 and 15 – these men are the ordained priests of the Church, to whom we must confess our sins.

Acts 19:18 - many came to orally confess sins and divulge their sinful practices. Oral confession was the practice of the early Church just as it is today.

Matt. 3:6; Mark 1:5 - again, this shows people confessing their sins before others as an historical practice (here to John the Baptist).

1 Tim. 6:12 - this verse also refers to the historical practice of confessing both faith and sins in the presence of many witnesses.

1 John 1:9 - if we confess are sins, God is faithful to us and forgives us and cleanse us. But we must confess our sins to one another.

Num. 5:7 - this shows the historical practice of publicly confessing sins, and making public restitution.

2 Sam. 12:14 - even though the sin is forgiven, there is punishment due for the forgiven sin. David is forgiven but his child was still taken (the consequence of his sin).

Neh. 9:2-3 - the Israelites stood before the assembly and confessed sins publicly and interceded for each other.

Sir. 4:26 - God tells us not to be ashamed to confess our sins, and not to try to stop the current of a river. Anyone who has experienced the sacrament of reconciliation understands the import of this verse.

Baruch 1:14 - again, this shows that the people made confession in the house of the Lord, before the assembly.

1 John 5:16-17; Luke 12:47-48 - there is a distinction between mortal and venial sins. This has been the teaching of the Catholic Church for 2,000 years, but, today, most Protestants no longer agree that there is such a distinction. Mortal sins lead to death and must be absolved in the sacrament of reconciliation. Venial sins do not have to be confessed to a priest, but the pious Catholic practice is to do so in order to advance in our journey to holiness.

Matt. 5:19 - Jesus teaches that breaking the least of commandments is venial sin (the person is still saved but is least in the kingdom), versus mortal sin (the person is not saved).

Good luck, my friend.


#8

Jesus forgave the man who was lowered through the roof…

Now does that mean he was not contrite in his heart? Not repentant? No. We do not know his interior. But Jesus could.

Are we to repent to be forgiven normally? yes. In some way. Are we normally to confess (and prior to that intend to as soon as possible) any mortal sins? Yes.

If I am not repentant – I cannot take it that my sins will be forgiven - with or prior to confession.

More there than you asked -but there it is.


#9

Romans 4:8 Blessed is the man to whom the Lord will not impute sin.

Peace


#10

There is nothing wrong with bringing more to a discussion thread…otherwise many threads would be terminated with a simple yes or no.

A significant service of this forum is to open up broader discussion sparked by an OP, for catechesis.

Peace and prayers,


#11

Thank you all for your responses. I’ve noted a few of the affirmative references that require confession and repentance.

What I’m getting at is this - non-Catholics tend to reject the necessity of the Eucharist as a sacrificial offering by using scripture to state that Jesus’ once for all sacrifice was sufficient for all time, and therefore, the “Sacrifice of the Mass” is unnecessary, and even blasphemous.

What I’m trying to determine is whether Jesus’ once for all sacrifice can be applied to anyone’s sins, when they do not confess them and repent of them. I believe His sacrifice does not apply to them, as evidenced by the fact that not every soul goes to Heaven (Judas, for example, is the son of perdition, according to Scripture). Therefore, we continue to offer the Sacrifice of the Mass to atone for those sins which are continuously being committed, and confessed and repented of, since we know that Jesus’ sacrifice is the only sacrifice that appeases God’s anger and answers justice.

The other question I have is this: whether Jesus’ sacrifice can be applied at the time of His crucifixion, to sins that are committed in the future, and are confessed and repented of in the future.

So when I talk about the Sacrifice of the Mass with my non-Catholic friends, I want to be able to challenge them to provide a single example of the forgiveness of sins, before the sin occurs, with or without confession and repentance. The only example I can see in Scripture is perhaps the story of the invalid being lowered through the roof. There is no indication that the individual, or his friends for that matter, asked Jesus to forgive His sins. Although, there is also not an indication that the person or his friends did not ask for it.

Any thoughts on this from Scripture?


#12

We should not look at the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass as a this **OR **that. There are many purposes including the basic primary purposes for prayer. The fact that the “Sacrifice of the Mass” is an unbloody re-presentation of Christ on His cross is why it is not blasphemous. We come to Mass in order to receive Jesus, Himself, truly present in the Eucharist.

So when I talk about the Sacrifice of the Mass with my non-Catholic friends, I want to be able to challenge them to provide a single example of the forgiveness of sins, before the sin occurs, with or without confession and repentance. The only example I can see in Scripture is perhaps the story of the invalid being lowered through the roof. There is no indication that the individual, or his friends for that matter, asked Jesus to forgive His sins. Although, there is also not an indication that the person or his friends did not ask for it.

Any thoughts on this from Scripture?

Yes. Chapter 14, Gospel of John.

This describes the authority of the Catholic Church when it comes to its protocol for properly defining and duly proclaiming the meanings (plural intended) of Divine Revelation in Scripture. See paragraphs 65-67, Catechism of the Catholic Church, Second Edition. See paragraphs 20-21 for explanation of small print.

Links to Catechism.

scborromeo.org/ccc.htm

usccb.org/beliefs-and-teachings/what-we-believe/catechism/catechism-of-the-catholic-church/


#13

scborromeo.org/ccc/p122a4p2.htm#III


#14

here from the Catechism: scborromeo.org/ccc/p122a4p2.htm#III


#15

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