Forgivness of sins at Mass

I know that a good Catholic has to go to confession, but aren’t sins forgiven at the begining of Mass? If a Catholic is truely sorry, are his sins forgiven at the beginning of Mass or does he still have to go to confession? Does this now cover mortal sins?

Thanks

[quote=jjsc3]I know that a good Catholic has to go to confession, but aren’t sins forgiven at the begining of Mass? If a Catholic is truely sorry, are his sins forgiven at the beginning of Mass or does he still have to go to confession? Does this now cover mortal sins?

Thanks
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In the Confiteor venial sins are remitted but mortal sins will remain this is why one cannot receive if they have mortal sin on their conscious.

Receiving the Eucharist also wipes away venial sin.

[quote=mosher]In the Confiteor venial sins are remitted but mortal sins will remain this is why one cannot receive if they have mortal sin on their conscious.
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I would also like to add to this that in case of grave matter the person can be forgiven with just a prayer, in which they express sorrow for them. Such cases would probably include lets say you usually go to confession once a week and you unexpectedly die before then. That is why constant prayer and repentance is necessary, since we never know the moment of our death. Also, in other grave cases you must do an act of contrition and promise to confess your sins to a priest as soon as possible, in such a case you can recieve communion. They say that if in 30 days you absolutely do not have the opportunity for confession, this is valid to do. Also, in life threatening cases too. However, we always need to go to confession even if we pray our hearts out prior to it. Confession can also cleanse the stain of sin, thus eliminating temporal punishment in purgatory.

May God bless you.

**PS: In my understanding, the grave cases thing can only be done if it is that communion is recieved from a lay or religious person. If it is given by a priest or deacon, obviously that would probably count as an opportunity to confess your sins to him before recieving. **

[quote=Roman_Army]I would also like to add to this that in case of grave matter the person can be forgiven with just a prayer, in which they express sorrow for them. Such cases would probably include lets say you usually go to confession once a week and you unexpectedly die before then. That is why constant prayer and repentance is necessary, since we never know the moment of our death. Also, in other grave cases you must do an act of contrition and promise to confess your sins to a priest as soon as possible, in such a case you can recieve communion. They say that if in 30 days you absolutely do not have the opportunity for confession, this is valid to do. Also, in life threatening cases too. However, we always need to go to confession even if we pray our hearts out prior to it. Confession can also cleanse the stain of sin, thus eliminating temporal punishment in purgatory.

May God bless you.
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What is required in this case is what is called a “Perfect Act of Contrition” which is very hard to fulfill. A perfect act has so many internal requirements that without some special grace it is near impossible to make it effecatious. While this is an option when there is a grave necessity it should not be used when confession is avaliable on a regular basis.

[quote=Roman_Army]However, we always need to go to confession even if we pray our hearts out prior to it. Confession can also cleanse the stain of sin, thus eliminating temporal punishment in purgatory.

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Is this true? I find the Catechism a bit unclear on this. Firstly, strictly speaking Confession and absolution does not remove tempral punishment. Possibly the Penance which is given at the sacrament does that. I say possibly because in the Catechism, within the section on the sacrament of reconciliation there is the section on Indulgences, which talks about indulgences and the need for works of mercy and charity (see CCC 1473). It says "The forgiveness of sin and restoration of communion with God ebtail the remission of eternal punishment of sin, but temporal punishment of sin remains."
If temporal punishment were remitted by the sacrament of reconciliation then there would be no need for indulgences.
Can anyone throw any light on this?

Can anyone throw any light on this?

Try #1472 and #1473 from the Catechism:
scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s2c2a4.htm#1472

An example would be of a child breaking his parent’s window. The child can repent and be forgiven by his parents yet the window still remains broken after the parents forgive the child.

If you are worried about temporal punishment then please read about Divine Mercy Sunday: ewtn.com/Devotionals/mercy/feast.htm

Mortal sins are not forgiven during mass. If you are in a state of mortal sin then please get to the sacrament of reconcilliation as soon as possible and confess all mortal sins by kind and number so that the sacrament will be valid. As soon as possible though you should make an act of perfect contrition:
nccbuscc.org/catechism/quizzes/penance5.htm

Remember, an act of perfect contrition must be said with the intent of receiving the Sacrament of Reconcilliation as soon as possible to be valid. Do not receive the Eucharist in the mean time though since you won’t know for sure whether or not your contrition was perfect.

Now, a question the original poster might be wondering is “Why go to confession when you haven’t committed any mortal sins?” Each Sacrament confers a grace:
scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s1c1a2.htm#IV

When you receive the Sacrament of Reconcilliation not only are your sins forgiven but you are also strengthened to resist further sin:
scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s2c2a4.htm#IX

Also, I reccomend the book “Swear to God” by Dr. Scott Hahn for learning more about the Sacraments.

[quote=Madia]Try #1472 and #1473 from the Catechism:
scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s2c2a4.htm#1472

An example would be of a child breaking his parent’s window. The child can repent and be forgiven by his parents yet the window still remains broken after the parents forgive the child.

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I understand the point about temporal punishment of sin. My point was (or meant to be) that if Confession/Reconciliation remits not only the guilt of sin, but also the temporal punishment due to sin (I’m sticking to venial sin) then what are indulgences for?
If the Sacrament of Reconciliation only remits the guilt of sin, and receiving the Eucharist does the same, then why go to Confession if you receive the Eucharist daily.
But then the Catechism does say that confession of venial sins is not strictly necessary.

This is also true of receiving the Eucharist.

My point was (or meant to be) that if Confession/Reconciliation remits not only the guilt of sin, but also the temporal punishment due to sin (I’m sticking to venial sin) then what are indulgences for?

Reconciliation does *not *(at least fully) remit temporal punishment. Read the section on indulgences in the Catechism:
scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s2c2a4.htm#X

On the question of whether or not the Sacrament of Reconciliation remits any temporal punishment is a question you might want to ask someone with a better knowledge of the Sacrament to me.

If the Sacrament of Reconciliation only remits the guilt of sin, and receiving the Eucharist does the same, then why go to Confession if you receive the Eucharist daily.

Why receive the do leg exercises when you already strengthened you legs by running two miles? Each Sacrament helps us on our journey toward God. In reconciliation, we humble ourselves before God acknowleding that we a sinners in need of His mercy and forgiveness. This action in itself strenghtens us against pride. We may also receive spiritual direction to help us grow closer to God. If you are struggling with venial sins such as impure thoughts, it’s helpful to confess them and get some advise on overcoming them. A book on Reconciliation you might be interested in is “Lord, Have Mercy”:
ewtn.com/vcatalogue/pages/itemdetail.asp?itemcode=1706&source=searchresult.asp&keyword=Mercy&g_than=1&l_than=2000&pgnu=1&category=BOOKS&eventcode=

But then the Catechism does say that confession of venial sins is not strictly necessary.

It is, however, highly recommended as stated in #1458. A good practice for those wanting to frequent the Sacrament is to begin the First Saturday Devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary:
dailycatholic.org/firstsat.htm
ewtn.com/library/MARY/FIRSTSAT.HTM
That way, you can get into the habit of receiving the Sacrament of Reconciliation at least once a month.

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