Forgot Consecration of the hosts?!?


#1

We had a school wide mass a couple minutes ago and the priest forgot to consecrate the hosts? So, if I am correct, I just consumed bread? And so did the other 1200 students? (Some hosts came from the tabernacle so a few were consecrated).

Does Canon Law or the Catechism say anything about this?

I’m kinda distraught. I mean I gave reverence to a piece of bread. And no one said a word. There were two other priests up there, too, that didn’t say anything.

Agh!!!


#2

Was it a Mass, or a Communion Service? And are you certain the other Hosts were not consecrated? You might want to go ask the one of the Priests who were there to make sure.


#3

I can’t imagine three concelebrating priests and no one noticed that there was no consecration. Is it possible that you somehow missed it, maybe just spaced out for a moment? As ahs said, you may want to talk with one of the priests just to reassure yourself.


#4

Lmbo I talked to one of the scholastic Jesuits and they, reassured me that…

THAT THERE WAS NO CONCECRATION!!


#5

Agree.


#6

Was it a communion service where they concecrated the Hosts before hand?

If it was a Mass, how do three priests forget to do concecrate the Hosts?

:confused:


#7

I think some were mixed in…maybe. So the problem is, in the tabernacle, there may be some unconsecrated mixed with consecrated!!

He was one of the accalites (spelling?). I will ask the presiding priest, but its not really going to change it. And yes, it was a mass. A mass for the dignity of human life!!


#8

You are presuming that there were unconsecrated hosts. Just because they were not consecrated during this service, does not mean they were not consecrated.

You are also presuming that because you did not witness consecration, that consecration did not take place. I suppose that’s actually reasonable since one would expect the order of Mass to follow the rubrics, etc…(if this were indeed a Mass and not a Communion Service) but you should not assume/presume. Go and find out for sure before drawing conclusions.


#9

Also, I recommend not posting to this or any other social media sites during the school day.


#10

Well I did…he did said they were not consecrated. So is there…some prayer or something I could do? I feel kinda empty :shrug:


#11

If they were not consecrated and you received plain bread instead of Christ, then you can offer a prayer for spiritual communion. It’s a fairly common prayer that can be found in some misselettes and prayer books. Ask God to preserve you in His Grace until the next time you are able to receive Eucharist.


#12

The priest says he did not consecrate the the host. Why not?

  • He remembers that he forgot? What did he forget? What to say?
  • He forgot that he was supposed to consecrate the bread?
  • You can forget when you aren’t really there, like when you misplace your keys. You know you forgot them because you can’t find them. You don’t remember the moment you weren’t paying attention, because you weren’t paying attention. I’m wondering how he knows he forgot.

This is an interesting problem. Why did no one say anything?

  • The two other priests.
  • The teachers and students may be excused because they wouldn’t want to disrupt things. They should have tho’.

Why did you revere something you knew to be a piece of bread that had not been consecrated?

I am a little confused, but that’s not new; I tend to over-analyze things

Pray, that’s always a good solution.


#13

It is extremely unlikely that all 3 priests somehow missed the consecration of the bread. Pretty near impossible. One, maybe. All three, near impossible.

Even if the presiding celebrant did forget (and although that’s unlikely, it’s not impossible), what should have happened is that one of the other 2 priests should say the words of consecration. All he would be required to do would be to whisper the words (as long as his lips are moving) “This is my body” while having the intention to consecrate. That’s the bare minimum.

In a situation like this, where the main celebrant forgets, the concelebrant must make a very quick decision “should I say anything, or should I just do it myself and let it be?” To avoid embarrassing the main celebrant, the concelebrating priest just might do that “short form” of the consecration, whispering the words, rather than to do something that would call even more attention to the main celebrant.

I actually had that happen to me. When I was newly ordained, and very nervous, after consecrating the bread, I accidentally turned the page and missed the consecration of the chalice. There was an elderly priest in the church (he wasn’t concelebrating). After the Mass, he privately, and kindly, pointed out to me what I had done. He said “don’t worry, I consecrated the chalice for you.” He knew what I did at the moment, but rather than make a big show of it, and cause me to look like a fool in front of all those people, he simply fixed it quietly.


#14

I’m not exactly sure about this, but it may be similar to the concept of mixing regular water to refill the Holy Water fonts low on water. Once the Consecrated is mixed with the regular, the regular becomes Consecrated as well.


#15

Sorry, but no. Mixing regular water with holy water just means you have regular water mixed with holy water. If you need more holy water, get more holy water!

Likewise, mixing consecrated and unconsecrated bread has the same effect - Jesus laying side by side with bread. I remember a priest telling me once he saw a nun do that, put unconsecrated hosts into an almost empty ciborium in the tabernacle - he had to do an emergency consecration before mass!


#16

Bless Father!
Interestingly enough, I recall seeing a similar thing happen once to Benedict XVI when he was saying Mass in the Sistine Chapel. He consecrated the bread, but then repeated the words of consecration of the bread for the chalice. Even the pope slips up sometimes! Thankfully he had concelebrants :slight_smile:


closed #17

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