Forgotten: The Battle Thousands of WWII Veterans (Filipino) Are Still Fighting


#1

Caleda, along with more than 250,000 Filipinos, answered President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s call to serve in WWII. As scouts, guerrillas, and enlisted soldiers in the Philippine Army, they were told they would get full benefits in exchange for putting their lives on the line, fighting side-by-side with the U.S. military.

But when the war was over, the promise was rescinded. The Rescission Act of 1946 voided their service and deemed their time of duty as not being “active military, naval, or air service for the purposes of any law of the United States conferring rights, privileges, or benefits upon any person” . . .

But a glimmer of hope arrived for the veterans in 2009 when President Barack Obama signed the Filipino Veterans Equity Compensation Act of 2009. After years of lobbying efforts, Filipino veterans who fought in the Philippines won a one-time lump sum payment — $15,000 if they lived in the U.S.; $9,000 if they still lived in the Philippines.


http://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/forgotten-battle-thousands-wwii-veterans-are-still-fighting-n520456

Uncle Sam drags his feet on this issue.


#2

People know nothing about the Japanese occupation if they think Filipinos were fighting for America and not to free the Philippines.

BTW, I’m not objecting to the lump sum payments.


#3

I’m not sure they were ever really entitled to benefits. The Philippine Independence Act of 1934 provided that the United States could call the Phillipine armed forces into service under the command of the United States military in the 10 intervening years between the Act’s passage and the recognition of the Phillipines as an independent nation (granted after an additional 2 years due to the war). They were compensated for their service by the United States so why hasn’t the government of the Phillipines provided for their long-term benefits seeing as how they were the military forces of the government of the Phillipine Commonwealth and, after the war, an independent Phillipines?


#4

the government probably spent it all on their politician’s mansions. Corruption is much more transparent there. if you’re rich enough, you could probably go to the shopping mall during your “prison sentence.”


#5

If FDR promised them this in WW2, after 1934, then we should have honored that agreement.

We also abandoned translators who worked for us in the ME to whom we promised help immigrating here.

Sheesh, the Army decommissions the military dogs overseas and then leaves them there.

Bad, bad, bad.


#6

It’s interesting how we always get a rosy picture of our relationship with the Filipino nation;
Yet, I really wonder if there’s any love lost by them for Americans:

fonsucu.blogspot.com/2005/11/filipino-genocide.html

That was during old TR’s term of office …
Mark Twain is one of the writers.


#7

They are quite fond of Americans (spent several yrs there myself)
Many many Filipinos have emigrated to the USA as well.


#8

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