Former Catholics become anti-Catholic


#1

This is only an observation:

I have noticed that when protestants convert to Catholicism, they remain very charitable to their former protestant roots. They are grateful for the foundations that were laid before they converted. On the other hand, Catholics who convert to protestantism usually become vehemently anti-Catholic and begin bashing the Church on many fronts. I know there are exceptions, but does anyone have any thoughts on why this occurs?


#2

Hey Mickey,
Does it count if I go and come back home?
I really think that it has most to do with what denom (or non-denom) they fall in with. I was also pretty hot with the ones I used to run with because I felt like they misled me for all those 34 years or so.
It could also be a mark of their maturity level…
Pax vobiscum,


#3

[quote=Mickey]This is only an observation:

I have noticed that when protestants convert to Catholicism, they remain very charitable to their former protestant roots. They are grateful for the foundations that were laid before they converted. On the other hand, Catholics who convert to protestantism usually become vehemently anti-Catholic and begin bashing the Church on many fronts. I know there are exceptions, but does anyone have any thoughts on why this occurs?
[/quote]

Here’s my totally biased theory from a cradle Catholic:

Going from Protestant to Catholic is usually an acceptance of a more rich and complete Christianity. It usually invloves accepting doctrines and practices that one didn’t have as a protestant. On the other hand, going from Protestant to Catholic involves more of a rejection of doctrines and practices. I think since rejection is more inherantly negative than acceptance, the rejecters tend to view what they rejected in a negative manner while the accepters view their Protestant background as the roots of what matured into a complete Christian Faith (Catholicism).

I have no idea if this is the case, but it kind of makes sense, no?:hmmm:


#4

I hope I’m not sounding uncharitable when I say this, but I think it’s ignorance.

I believe most converts from the Catholic Church to Protestanism are ignorant of the Church’s teachings when they convert so they become anti-Catholic based on what they are taught about the Church from their protestant denomination.

On the other hand, Protestant converts to the Catholic Church (ie. Mark Shea, Steve Ray, Scott Hahn) are usually very knowledgeable about the religion they belonged to before becoming a part of the Church. Also, they are not taught to be anti-protestant by the church while protestants typically are taught to be anti-Catholic.


#5

[quote=Church Militant]Hey Mickey,
Does it count if I go and come back home?
I really think that it has most to do with what denom (or non-denom) they fall in with. I was also pretty hot with the ones I used to run with because I felt like they misled me for all those 34 years or so.
It could also be a mark of their maturity level…
Pax vobiscum,
[/quote]

I think reverts may be a different thread. It seems that reverts have lots of good zeal because of the journey they endured. God Bless you CM!

smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/17/17_1_12v.gif


#6

[quote=Genesis315]Here’s my totally biased theory from a cradle Catholic:

I have no idea if this is the case, but it kind of makes sense, no?:hmmm:
[/quote]

Interesting theory, I think it makes alot of sense actually. Combine that with what I said above and you have protestant converts rejecting things that they THINK the Church teaches (ie. Mary worship).


#7

[quote=Genesis315]Here’s my totally biased theory from a cradle Catholic:

Going from Protestant to Catholic is usually an acceptance of a more rich and complete Christianity. It usually invloves accepting doctrines and practices that one didn’t have as a protestant. On the other hand, going from Protestant to Catholic involves more of a rejection of doctrines and practices. I think since rejection is more inherantly negative than acceptance, the rejecters tend to view what they rejected in a negative manner while the accepters view their Protestant background as the roots of what matured into a complete Christian Faith (Catholicism).

I have no idea if this is the case, but it kind of makes sense, no?:hmmm:
[/quote]

Makes sense Genesis. Please allow me to make a correction on your post. " on the other hand, going from Catholic to protestant involves more of a rejection of doctrines and practices."

:blessyou:


#8

[quote=RichSpidizzy]Interesting theory, I think it makes alot of sense actually. Combine that with what I said above and you have protestant converts rejecting things that they THINK the Church teaches (ie. Mary worship).
[/quote]

:amen:


#9

[quote=Mickey]Makes sense Genesis. Please allow me to make a correction on your post. " on the other hand, going from Catholic to protestant involves more of a rejection of doctrines and practices."

:blessyou:
[/quote]

Thanks! I really should proof read…


#10

I can speak from personal experience. When Catholics converted to the Baptist religion I was formerly in, they were amazed to say the least. They never heard of a personal relationship with Christ in their church. They merely did what they were told and raised to do and not really understanding it all. They also liked the idea that they now had assurance of going to heaven should they die.

                                           Anti Catholicism isn't really pushed in evangelical circles, as much as a personal love for Jesus Christ, bible study and learning how to live the Christian faith in everyday life. This is why Sunday school is so important for adults.There is no quietness in an evangelical church or somber faces, but when you walk in, everyone is happy and greeting one another. **People talk to each other** in evangelical churches. You can't even get into the front door without a friendly greeting. People like to be welcomed and made to feel like they really belong. This I believe attracts lots of Catholics to evangelical churches.

#11

[quote=gladtobe]I can speak from personal experience. When Catholics converted to the Baptist religion I was formerly in, they were amazed to say the least. They never heard of a personal relationship with Christ in their church. They merely did what they were told and raised to do and not really understanding it all. They also liked the idea that they now had assurance of going to heaven should they die.

Anti Catholicism isn’t really pushed in evangelical circles, as much as a personal love for Jesus Christ, bible study and learning how to live the Christian faith in everyday life. This is why Sunday school is so important for adults.There is no quietness in an evangelical church or somber faces, but when you walk in, everyone is happy and greeting one another. People talk to each other in evangelical churches. You can’t even get into the front door without a friendly greeting. People like to be welcomed and made to feel like they really belong. This I believe attracts lots of Catholics to evangelical churches.
[/quote]

I agree with this gladtobe. My best friend is a baptist, though his journey toward the fullness of truth has begun. Right now he calls himself a bapolic. :slight_smile: Anyway, his church really emphasizes the fellowship aspect. We joke around and I tell him that their ships are in the wrong order; worship must be emphasized before fellowship. He teaches a bible study at his church, and when the anti-Catholic rhetoric begins, he defends the Catholic position. It may take him many more years to convert because his wife and children are not on the same path. But I pray for him everyday.


#12

I think a lot of the anti-Catholicism comes from the fact that, by its claims and by its very existence, the Catholic Church is felt by many Protestants to be sitting in judgement of them and their beliefs. For them to be right they must show that the Catholic Church is wrong. Same thing with many non-religious people – they also feel the Catholic Church is sitting in judgement on them. Catholics, OTOH, don’t feel that Protestantism (or the secular world) is sitting in judgement of them.


#13

If Catholicism is the “fullness” of Christianity, then something happens to make someone reject that for something else which is “less than the fullness.”

Logically, this must be something negative. Example: why would you take the half full glass instead of the full one? Answer: There must be something wrong with the full glass. So when a Catholic leaves the Catholic Church they have a negative reason for doing so which they take into their Protestant setting. There, they often come across people with similar stories of the “evils of Catholicism.”

On the other hand, those who feel something lacking in their version of Christianity may seek out the Catholic Church and upon finding her often find what they thought was missing. This is a positive experience rather than a negative one and again, they often meet people with a similar story of the “joys of Catholicism”

Personally, at present I’m not sure where I fit in terms of these 2 situations. 3 months ago I was most certainly situation 1, although not attending a Church. Now, I feel like I may have jumped ship too quickly. I doubt I will return to Catholicism again, there is too much that has gone on and there are several teachings I never see myself accepting/agreeing with. However my “anti-Catholic” feelings when I first left the Church have dissipated over time, and with prayerful self examination I have come to the conclusion that although for me the Catholic Church has many problems, there are others who seek Jesus within her.


#14

[quote=teresas1979]If Catholicism is the “fullness” of Christianity, then something happens to make someone reject that for something else which is “less than the fullness.”

Logically, this must be something negative. Example: why would you take the half full glass instead of the full one? Answer: There must be something wrong with the full glass. So when a Catholic leaves the Catholic Church they have a negative reason for doing so which they take into their Protestant setting. There, they often come across people with similar stories of the “evils of Catholicism.”

On the other hand, those who feel something lacking in their version of Christianity may seek out the Catholic Church and upon finding her often find what they thought was missing. This is a positive experience rather than a negative one and again, they often meet people with a similar story of the “joys of Catholicism”

Personally, at present I’m not sure where I fit in terms of these 2 situations. 3 months ago I was most certainly situation 1, although not attending a Church. Now, I feel like I may have jumped ship too quickly. I doubt I will return to Catholicism again, there is too much that has gone on and there are several teachings I never see myself accepting/agreeing with. However my “anti-Catholic” feelings when I first left the Church have dissipated over time, and with prayerful self examination I have come to the conclusion that although for me the Catholic Church has many problems, there are others who seek Jesus within her.
[/quote]

I respect your opinion teresas. But with all due respect, I don’t believe there are problems with the Church. Doctrine doesn’t sin—people do. Sometimes Catholics are not taught properly, or come into contact with liberal elements within the Church etc. People blame the Church. But proper study and understanding of scripture as interpreted through Sacred Tradition and a thorough knowledge of Church history will enable the individual to discern false teachings and bad theology. A big problem I see is relativism. Some Catholics will not agree on a Church teaching, such as contraception, abortion, divorce, etc. So they will find a church that is more in line with what they believe. I often see the sacrament of reconciliation tied into this. Going to confession is a profound act of humility. Many people have too much pride to participate in this beautiful sacrament. Now let’s say someone participated in the act of abortion. As a Catholic they know they must go to confession if they are to continue to recieve the Blessed Sacrament. But they are afraid to confess this sin. There are two choices remaining: Continue to go to Mass and receive communion anyway (another mortal sin), or find a church where you can confess your sins directly to God in private. The first option usually causes guilt, so the second is opted for because it is easy. Catholicism is not easy. Confession helps us to be humble, contrite , and accountable. But sooooo many people now feel that confession is not necessary. I see some leave the Church directly because of confession! Yes, God is all merciful and forgiving. That is why Jesus established the sacrament of reconciliation–for our benefit! Sorry to veer off course. I ramble sometimes. :slight_smile: I hope you stay with the Catholic Church teresas. Peace.

:blessyou:


#15

Protestantism is in its very origin a negative. The whole enterprise defines itself by what it rejects.

Also, a lot of Catholics were in one way or another hurt by some official person in the Church, like a priest of sister – or they have come up against a difficulty like divorce.

And then, there is the factor that when you leave Christ’s One, Holy, Catholic, Apostolic Church, outside of which there is no salvation, you need to self-justify until you are black in the face. You also need to dredge up anything awful you can find to justify your position.

I know one person who left the Catholic Church who has nothing but good to say about the Church – but he is rare (and I hope he’ll come back home soon).


#16

[quote=VociMike]I think a lot of the anti-Catholicism comes from the fact that, by its claims and by its very existence, the Catholic Church is felt by many Protestants to be sitting in judgement of them and their beliefs. For them to be right they must show that the Catholic Church is wrong. Same thing with many non-religious people – they also feel the Catholic Church is sitting in judgement on them. Catholics, OTOH, don’t feel that Protestantism (or the secular world) is sitting in judgement of them.
[/quote]


(Good thought, I agree)


“I suggest we unclump and just become Christians.
Remember how important it is
What you believe
What you say
walk in love
edwinG”


Another good thought. Since there is much Pride in the world, it is my belief that the unclumping will not occur on earth, if left to men. But in Heaven all will be Christians.


#17

As a revert/convert from fundamental branches, I see the negativity as being egged on by demon harrassment. I have a mental picture (from fictional Christian novels:D ) of demons attatching, (not possessing) themselves to people to stir up the feelings of anger, hurt, disappointment and confusion.

I do believe the activities of “Satan and all the evil spirits who prowl the world seeking the ruin of souls” are sometimes dismissed too easily by many Catholics Christians.

Just my mental picture of why former Catholics can become so “anti-Catholic”.

God Bless,
Maria


#18

:wink:

[quote=Mickey]This is only an observation:

I have noticed that when protestants convert to Catholicism, they remain very charitable to their former protestant roots. They are grateful for the foundations that were laid before they converted. On the other hand, Catholics who convert to protestantism usually become vehemently anti-Catholic and begin bashing the Church on many fronts. I know there are exceptions, but does anyone have any thoughts on why this occurs?
[/quote]

Mickey,
I agree with you totally. I was one of the Catholics that left the Church because of a personal problem. During that time, out of my hurt, I became very very angry at the Church and verbally lashed out at it any chance that I got. During that time, I tried every protestant and fundamentalist church in my area and never found what I was looking for. One day a priest said to me, “I think you’re angry at yourself and not the Church” and he was right…That was the beginning of my journey home. I don’t understand how any serious Catholic could ever leave and find happiness in another faith.

I too have noticed that when most protestants convert, they very rarely bash their former Church.

In my case my anger occurred because of a bitter divorce that I was going through…long story.

Blessings,
Shannin


#19

[quote=shannin]:wink:
Mickey,
I agree with you totally. I was one of the Catholics that left the Church because of a personal problem. During that time, out of my hurt, I became very very angry at the Church and verbally lashed out at it any chance that I got. During that time, I tried every protestant and fundamentalist church in my area and never found what I was looking for. One day a priest said to me, “I think you’re angry at yourself and not the Church” and he was right…That was the beginning of my journey home. I don’t understand how any serious Catholic could ever leave and find happiness in another faith.

I too have noticed that when most protestants convert, they very rarely bash their former Church.

In my case my anger occurred because of a bitter divorce that I was going through…long story.

Blessings,
Shannin

[/quote]

Hi Shannin!

God Bless you. You hit the nail on the head. What a wise priest!

:slight_smile:


#20

I believe that the reason why they left the church in the first place was because one had finally read the bible and found out that the catholic church was teaching false doctrine. so when he leaves he wants to show all that information that brought him to the truth.


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