Founding dates of Christian demoninations


#1

Help,

A few years ago I came across a document that listed the different Christian demoninations by their founding or birth date. The list began with the newest and went back to the earliest, the Catholic church. The short descriptions of each demonination included the date they were founded, who founded and a short description as to why it was founded. I need this for a adult faith formation meeting in my parish and am in desperate need to locate. I had a copy but cannot locate it and do not remember which web site I found it in. Any help will be greatly appreciated.


#2

Here is one such list:

iamonetruth.com/unity.htm

Just do a search for “if you are”.

Here is the one you are probably speaking of:

**How Old Is Your Church?

**If you are a Lutheran, your religion was founded by Martin Luther, an ex-monk of the Catholic Church, in the year 1517.

If you belong to the Church of England, your religion was founded by King Henry VIII in the year 1534, because the Pope would not grant him a divorce with the right to re-marry.

If you are a Presbyterian, your religion was founded by John Knox in Scotland in the year 1560.

If you are a Congregationalist, your religion was originated by Robert Brown in Holland in 1582.

If you are a Baptist, you owe the tenets of your religion to John Smyth, who launched it in Amsterdam in 1605.

If you are of the Dutch Reformed church, you recognize Michaelis Jones as founder, because he originated your religion in New York in 1628.

If you are a Protestant Episcopalian, your religion was an offshoot of the Church of England founded by Samuel Seabury in the American colonies in the 17th century.

If you are a Methodist, your religion was launched by John and Charles Wesley in England in 1744.

If you are a Unitarian, Theophilus Lindley founded your church in London in 1774.

If you are a Mormon (Latter Day Saints), Joseph Smith started your religion in Palmyra, N.Y., in 1829.

If you worship with the Salvation Army, your sect began with William Booth in London in 1865.

If you are a Christian Scientist, you look to 1879 as the year in which your religion was born and to Mrs. Mary Baker Eddy as its founder.

If you belong to one of the religious organizations known as “Church of the Nazarene,” “Pentecostal Gospel,” “Holiness Church,” “Pilgrim Holiness Church,” “Jehovah’s Witnesses,” your religion is one of the hundreds of new sects founded by men within the past one hundred years.

If you are Roman Catholic, you know that your religion was founded in the year 33 by Jesus Christ, the Son of God, and it is still the same Church.

“O God,
I humbly beseech thee to teach me thy true religion,
that leads to everlasting happiness,
through Jesus Christ thy Son, our Lord. Amen.”

**How Old Is Your Church?

**If you are a Lutheran, your religion was founded by Martin Luther, an ex-monk of the Catholic Church, in the year 1517.

If you belong to the Church of England, your religion was founded by King Henry VIII in the year 1534, because the Pope would not grant him a divorce with the right to re-marry.

If you are a Presbyterian, your religion was founded by John Knox in Scotland in the year 1560.

If you are a Congregationalist, your religion was originated by Robert Brown in Holland in 1582.

If you are a Baptist, you owe the tenets of your religion to John Smyth, who launched it in Amsterdam in 1605.

If you are of the Dutch Reformed church, you recognize Michaelis Jones as founder, because he originated your religion in New York in 1628.

If you are a Protestant Episcopalian, your religion was an offshoot of the Church of England founded by Samuel Seabury in the American colonies in the 17th century.

If you are a Methodist, your religion was launched by John and Charles Wesley in England in 1744.

If you are a Unitarian, Theophilus Lindley founded your church in London in 1774.

If you are a Mormon (Latter Day Saints), Joseph Smith started your religion in Palmyra, N.Y., in 1829.

If you worship with the Salvation Army, your sect began with William Booth in London in 1865.

If you are a Christian Scientist, you look to 1879 as the year in which your religion was born and to Mrs. Mary Baker Eddy as its founder.

If you belong to one of the religious organizations known as “Church of the Nazarene,” “Pentecostal Gospel,” “Holiness Church,” “Pilgrim Holiness Church,” “Jehovah’s Witnesses,” your religion is one of the hundreds of new sects founded by men within the past one hundred years.

If you are Roman Catholic, you know that your religion was founded in the year 33 by Jesus Christ, the Son of God, and it is still the same Church.

“O God,
I humbly beseech thee to teach me thy true religion,
that leads to everlasting happiness,
through Jesus Christ thy Son, our Lord. Amen.”

Not sure where the website went that you speak of. I got if from the phatmass archives.


#3

Without further discussion of what these dates mean and what members of each denomination think the Church is, such a list is meaningless and even dishonest. It will not help form anyone’s faith. It will only make Catholics smug and everyone else annoyed.

It’s the Catholic equivalent of Boettner’s infamous list of “Catholic inventions.”

Edwin


#4

I have to admit Edwin, there is some truth in it. Didn’t King Henry VIII founded the Angelican Church, or the Church of England? I think the Episcopalian is the American branch of the Church of England, correct if I’m wrong. They break with Rome sometime in 1531.

If they didn’t break with Rome. Then I think it would be easy to say that the Anglican Church is founded sometime in the late 6th Century.

Wikipedia has an interesting article on it early Christianity in England too.

Anglicans traditionally date the origins of their Church to the arrival in the Kingdom of Kent of the first Archbishop of Canterbury, St Augustine, at the end of the 6th century. However, the origin of the Church in the British Isles extends farther back. Christianity first gained a foothold during the Roman occupation of Britannia, possibly as early as the 1st century. The first recorded Christian martyr in Britain, St Alban, is thought to have lived in the early 4th century, and his prominence in Anglican hagiography is reflected in the number of parish churches of which he is patron. Restitutus (fl. 314) is known to have been the metropolitan bishop of London and he is named as having attended the Council of Arles. Irish Anglicans trace their origins back to the founding saint of Irish Christianity (St Patrick) who was a Roman Briton and pre-dated Anglo-Saxon Christianity. Some Anglicans consider Celtic Christianity a forerunner of their church, since the re-establishment of Christianity in some areas in the early sixth century came via Irish and Scottish missionaries, notably Patrick and St Columba.

Back in those days, the Church in England was in Union with the Church of Rome. Of course, the Catholics living in England I believe can trace their background to those days since these English Catholics didn’t cut themselves from Rome.


#5

Here’s another list:
scripturecatholic.com/history.html


#6

**Church Year Established Founder Where Established

Catholic 33 Jesus Christ Jerusalem

Orthodox 1054 Schismatic Catholic
Bishops Constantinople

Lutheran 1517 Martin Luther Germany

Anabaptist 1521 Nicholas Storch &
Thomas Munzer Germany

Anglican 1534 Henry VIII England

**
This chart is unhistorical.

Catolic Church was never founded in Jerusalem. Latin Catolic Church never existed in Jerusalem or Palestine until brought there by Crusaders of 11th to 13th centuries. The Church of Jerusalem whose first bishop was Apostl James was and is Orthodox.

The Church of Aleksandria (Orthodox or Coptic) was founded by Saint Mark disciple of St. Peter, apostl of Christ.

The Church of Antioch (Orthodox, Monofisite) is founded by St. Paul, bishop was St. Peter, Apostl.

Church of Rome itself was Greek church at its birth - Latin Church as such only emerges at 11th century, having slipped away from Orthodox, built up with Decretals Pseudoisidor and Donatio Constantini. Perhaps more accurate historicaly and better say Bishop of Rome Nickolas I founded Catolic church - or gave it shape.


#7

It depends on how you define it. Henry VIII broke with Rome, then the break was fixed under Mary, then it was renewed under Elizabeth (it can be argued that the Pope was the one who renewed it that time, though given the measures taken by Parliament there’s some special pleading in that claim). At any rate, the Church of England as an institution does date from the 6th century, though of course “Anglicanism” as a distinct branch of Christianity does not (arguably the first English Prayer Book of 1549 is the more important date there). More to the point, no theologically educated Anglican thinks that Anglicanism is his/her “religion.” The claim is nonsense. Anglicanism is not a religion, period. That’s the basic reason why the list is misleading.

I think the Episcopalian is the American branch of the Church of England, correct if I’m wrong.

More correctly it’s the American branch of the Anglican Communion. As the list says, we got our own bishops after the Revolution (from the Scottish Episcopal Church, not the C of E). But again, clearly that does not constitute a separate “religion,” but a separate, autonomous province of one Communion which has never itself claimed to be the True Church.

The claims on the list all have some basis in fact. But by and large the claims in Boettner’s list have some basis in fact too. Most of the dates he gives have some significance for the development of the doctrines and practices he describes, but the context is completely lost. (I’m not claiming the two lists are absolutely identical in worthlessness!)

Edwin


#8

So the Christians who fled into the hills prior to the destruction of the Temple in 70 A.D. had no church?

I had no idea that Pentecost took place in Athens!


#9

Well, far be it for you to provide the alternate date of the founding of the Catholic Church and the historical evidence for it, Edwin.

No such thing as a smug or dishonest Anglican, I guess. Well, aside from Henry VIII, who was both in spades.


#10

Catolic Church was never founded in Jerusalem. Latin Catolic Church never existed in Jerusalem or Palestine until brought there by Crusaders of 11th to 13th centuries. The Church of Jerusalem whose first bishop was Apostl James was and is Orthodox.

The Church of Aleksandria (Orthodox or Coptic) was founded by Saint Mark disciple of St. Peter, apostl of Christ.

The Church of Antioch (Orthodox, Monofisite) is founded by St. Paul, bishop was St. Peter, Apostle.

Partially correct but your information is incorrect. The Catholic Church was founded in Jerusalem. There were 3 major Churches at the time of the Apostles, Jerusalem, Rome, Antioch. Of course there were new Churches added to this list, like Constantinople and Alexandria. In all the Churches had 5 Patriheads.

The bishops of Rome and Antioch is Peter, Jerusalem James, Constantinople Andrew, and Alexandria is Mark.

Back then there was one Church. Even St. Ignatius of Antioch wrote his letter to the Symneareans in the year 110 AD, where there is Wherever the bishop shall appear, there let the multitude [of the people] also be; even as, wherever Jesus Christ is, there is the Catholic Church. (Letters to the Smyrnaeans)

Church of Rome itself was Greek church at its birth - Latin Church as such only emerges at 11th century, having slipped away from Orthodox, built up with Decretals Pseudoisidor and Donatio Constantini. Perhaps more accurate historicaly and better say Bishop of Rome Nickolas I founded Catolic church - or gave it shape.

Incorrect, the first Pope is Peter (32-67) then after him Linus (67-76), Anacletus (76-88), St. Clement of Rome 88-97), and so forth.

You can even check the list of Popes.

The Church in Rome had its liturgy in Greek but change it to Latin around the 4th Century not the 11th Century as you presumed.

Only in the fourth century did this change, and the change was not complete until nearly the end of the century. Unfortunately we know very little about how this took place, not even whether it was sudden or gradual. The fact that the inscriptions on the tombs of the** Popes change from Greek to Latin **from the time of St Cornelius, who died a martyr in 253, has been claimed by some scholars to be significant, but in fact there is no evidence that this was accompanied by any change in the language of the liturgy. What is certain is that the Canon (Eucharistic Prayer) was still being said in Greek after the middle of the fourth century, since the author Marius Victorinus Afer, in a treatise against the Arians written about the year 360 switches from Latin into Greek when he wants to quote from it.

latin-mass-society.org/latinlegionaries.htm.

The existence of the Church in Rome was already set but its liturgy was not Latin in its beginnings. So the date of the foundation of the Church is 32 AD. Jesus founded One Church, and it is the Catholic Church.

The Orthodox Church came out of 1054 AD. There was no Orthodox Church back then. The earliest record we had describing an Eastern Orthodox Church was none existence. We do have documents like St. Ignatius of Antioch describing the Church as Catholic.


#11

What would make you think that I’m trying to provide any such thing? The whole concept of a “founding date for your religion” is silly, because all versions of Christianity go back to Christ and the Apostles. It is indeed useful and important for Catholics to ask Protestants about their relationship to the 2,000 years of Christian tradition. But listing dates, or listing numbers of denominations, doesn’t cut it. It’s a short-cut and accomplishes nothing but to create a poisonous rhetorical fog.

Edwin


#12

The claim is nonsense. Anglicanism is not a religion, period. That’s the basic reason why the list is misleading.

It’s not a religion? Explain that. I know it is. It’s just a part of the Protestant Denomination that set itself apart from other Protestants.


#13

Catholic Church - 33 AD - Jesus Christ

List of Popes:

newadvent.org/cathen/12272b.htm


#14

:whacky:

Ok…tell me another one!


#15

Quite the contrary—history is history. Don’t you believe that the faithful of any community ought to know the history of their community?

Given the schismatic nature of Christian history, it is important that we all know how and why such things happened. Schisms are the scars on Christ’s body, it’s vital we know the story behind each if we’re ever to heal them.

Isn’t your real problem with it that this is an area wherein the Catholic Church has the favorable position?


#16

Well, the notion that Anglicanism’s not a denomination is a shock to me, christened and confirmed as an Episcopalian, the American branch of the Anglican Church.

Poor Thomas More found out, didn’t he?


#17

Protestantism is not a denomination. You are using the terms rather recklessly.

Christianity is a religion. Anglicanism is one particular form of the Christian religion. Episcopalianism is an American denomination which is part of the Anglican Communion. Protestantism is a broad tradition encompassing many denominations and independent churches.

Edwin


#18

I do think Protestant is a denomination because there are many with different doctrines and beliefs… I believe there are 33,000 of them. Anglicanism is one of them.


#19

First of all, it is true that strictly speaking Anglicanism is not a denomination. The Episcopal Church is a denomination. Neither the Episcopal Church nor Anglicanism is a religion of its own, which is what I was saying. I believe I have mentioned previously that conversation can be carried on much more conveniently when we quote each other accurately.:smiley:

Poor Thomas More found out, didn’t he?

Since St. Thomas More was martyred long before the concept of the “denomination” was invented, no he didn’t find out. If you mean that his death proved that Anglicanism was a separate religion, no I don’t think it did that either. For one thing, he was after all executed as a traitor (i.e., because he went against the will of the monarch–and he was of course quite right to do so). I’m not sure that an execution for heresy really means that the persecutor and persecuted belong to two different religions, but at that point we are perhaps getting into semantics (it may be true that Protestants and Catholics of the sixteenth century thought we were part of two different religions, though Richard Hooker essentially denied this in the Elizabethan era, and got into trouble with the Puritans for doing so). However, since St. Thomas was not executed for heresy, that really is irrelevant. Henry VIII did not think he was starting a new religion–that much is pretty clear.

Edwin


#20

This is illogical. Protestantism is a denomination because it contains 33,000 denominations? That’s like saying that the Earth is a nation because it contains several hundred nations.

By the 33,000 figure, I am sure that Anglicanism is not one single denomination. That kind of number is arrived at only when you count every single national body as a separate “denomination.”

Edwin


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