Freedom, rights and equality


#1

In 1960, the FDA approved The Pill. Since that time, a series of events occurred outside of the Catholic Church, the fruits of which we are seeing today. The folowing is an excerpt from The Ratzinger Report by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger:

catholicinsight.com/online/culture/article_621.shtml

Peace,
Ed


#2

[quote="edwest2, post:1, topic:226643"]
In 1960, the FDA approved The Pill. Since that time, a series of events occurred outside of the Catholic Church, the fruits of which we are seeing today. The folowing is an excerpt from The Ratzinger Report by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger:

catholicinsight.com/online/culture/article_621.shtml

Peace,
Ed

[/quote]

Interesting article and isnt it interesting that the Tenets of Free Masonry is Liberty , Equality , Fraternity.

Any guesses as to who is behind the Modernist Progressive movement?


#3

[quote="Robert_Burns, post:2, topic:226643"]
Interesting article and isnt it interesting that the Tenets of Free Masonry is Liberty , Equality , Fraternity.

Any guesses as to who is behind the Modernist Progressive movement?

[/quote]

Well, we have been being attacked on three fronts: Marxism (Communists, mostly), Masonry, and Modernism (mostly from within the Church, unfortunately). All three, I think, are "children" of the Enlightenment movement, which began in France about 300 years ago as an attempt to create a society without God. The battle has been on for some time. Unfortunately, most aren't aware of it, and, therefore, aren't really fighting it. The fruits of it are a dying society of death in which we live, in which there is an ever increasing attempt at pushing God out of our society. We win in the end, but with how many casualties? How many souls will be lost before it's over?


#4

[quote="Scoobyshme, post:3, topic:226643"]
Well, we have been being attacked on three fronts: Marxism (Communists, mostly), Masonry, and Modernism (mostly from within the Church, unfortunately). All three, I think, are "children" of the Enlightenment movement, which began in France about 300 years ago as an attempt to create a society without God. The battle has been on for some time. Unfortunately, most aren't aware of it, and, therefore, aren't really fighting it. The fruits of it are a dying society of death in which we live, in which there is an ever increasing attempt at pushing God out of our society. We win in the end, but with how many casualties? How many souls will be lost before it's over?

[/quote]

Actually to the French Revolution which of course supported the American revolution and in Europe the Philosopher Hegel (See Hegelianism in the Encyclopedia above) His progresssive views on Philosophy inspired Marx and Darwin and so many others.

St Pope Pius the X outlines what it is specifically in "Pacendi Domenici Gregis"


#5

By rejecting the Church as old, or no longer relevant, who do Catholics accept?

I cringe when I hear the word Progressive. Progress towards what? Sex has gone from real love and romance to "just sex" on TV, an action like going to the bathroom.

We have natural urges to eat and sleep but we are discouraged from doing either to excess. However, look at some recent slogans: "No rules, just right." "Too much is never enough." "Showtime. No limits."

Self-restraint for the sake of virtue is necessary, but lately, I've seen a few books and magazines that wish to break through this boundary. I heard a comedian preach "There is no such thing as bad language." From where does he get any authority? Yet, for those who believe the slogans, what's one more?

If we only worship the god Change, and expect it to give us more "freedom," what happens to authentic freedom? Slavery to things and sexual experiences is not our true calling. We will stand before the Living God one day and will give an account of all the things we did.

God bless,
Ed


#6

[quote="edwest2, post:5, topic:226643"]
By rejecting the Church as old, or no longer relevant, who do Catholics accept?

I cringe when I hear the word Progressive. Progress towards what? Sex has gone from real love and romance to "just sex" on TV, an action like going to the bathroom.

We have natural urges to eat and sleep but we are discouraged from doing either to excess. However, look at some recent slogans: "No rules, just right." "Too much is never enough." "Showtime. No limits."

Self-restraint for the sake of virtue is necessary, but lately, I've seen a few books and magazines that wish to break through this boundary. I heard a comedian preach "There is no such thing as bad language." From where does he get any authority? Yet, for those who believe the slogans, what's one more?

If we only worship the god Change, and expect it to give us more "freedom," what happens to authentic freedom? Slavery to things and sexual experiences is not our true calling. We will stand before the Living God one day and will give an account of all the things we did.

God bless,
Ed

[/quote]

The one thing all Heretics have in common is change.


#7

[quote="Robert_Burns, post:6, topic:226643"]
The one thing all Heretics have in common is change.

[/quote]

Could you explain how, say, Monophysitism, Donatism, or Jansenism exhibit "change"? Or do I assume more correctly this is just a tactless way of saying that you don't like (what you perceive to be) change?


#8

[quote="edwest2, post:1, topic:226643"]
In 1960, the FDA approved The Pill. Since that time, a series of events occurred outside of the Catholic Church, the fruits of which we are seeing today. The folowing is an excerpt from The Ratzinger Report by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger:

catholicinsight.com/online/culture/article_621.shtml

Peace,
Ed

[/quote]

Thank you, Ed, for sharing this. This article is - typical of our present Holy Father - most profound in its insight.

The big, lingering question is why these words and beliefs of our present Holy Father do not seem to translate into the homilies and teachings of our particular Churches and schools.

I especially like the final part of the article. Then-Cardinal Ratzinger identifies that the greatest immediate damage done by feminism is, paradoxically, to women (but naturally, also the men consequently suffer).

As an aside, it is striking that Christianity yet still tends toward such a unity of mind and thinking across such diverse places, times and cultures.

Pax,
Tim


#9

When Pope Benedict came to the United States, certain Catholic institutions of higher learning were expecting some type of rebuke. The Church in the United States only got some reminders.

We Catholics did not reach this point in history by accident. Outside social forces insisted and insisted, creating a small breach here and one there, until the dam burst in the 1990s. Who would've thought even then that children might see graphic images on their cell phones? However, let us not forget that Rome was once Debauchery Central in the ancient world.

We must carefully determine where real rights need support as opposed to accepting everyone and everything that people claim require "rights" of some kind. The push is on here to legalize marijuana.

Peace,
Ed


#10

As this site is fond of reminding people, Change is to become something else ; progress, to develop in and of itself.

But you beg another important question : how do we recognize progress from change ? As humans, we naturally depend on our senses and our intellect. In terms of the Church, we have a clear and manifest record on both accounts of something trying to change the Church (whether perceived through the senses or through our intellects - but for most, both). We see, feel, et al., but also realize something trying to super-impose itself over and against our Holy Mother, the Church. That (whatever it may be) is what we combat as Church Militant,

“[7] And when the thousand years shall be finished, Satan shall be loosed out of his prison, and shall go forth, and seduce the nations, which are over the four quarters of the earth, Gog, and Magog, and shall gather them together to battle, the number of whom is as the sand of the sea. [8] And they came upon the breadth of the earth, and encompassed the camp of the saints*, and the beloved city.”

*“the camp of the saints,” which Saint Augustine interprets as being the Church Militant on earth ; that is, the City of God, the society of Jesus Christ.

And this from popular wisdom,

"A house divided cannot stand."
It is perfectly logical to know that the Church first must be cleansed of the filth festering in her before she can practically do as her Divine Nature compels her to do, and serve the nations in Chairty toward the common welfare of mankind. Our necessary state and condition in militancy is moot, and - quite frankly - even insane if we are not actually engaged in some kind of real warfare (that is, defending the holy and beloved city, the Church and Truth of Christ), from those who would rob us of it or destroy it, and thereby hope to deprive mankind in general also of it.

Pax,
Tim


#11

[quote="MarkThompson, post:7, topic:226643"]
Could you explain how, say, Monophysitism, Donatism, or Jansenism exhibit "change"? Or do I assume more correctly this is just a tactless way of saying that you don't like (what you perceive to be) change?

[/quote]

You assume. And if you want to know what I think - just ask.


#12

Last night I visited Patrick Madrid’s website, and found this quote:

“Whether marriage is redefined now or later, whether our religious freedom is trampled now or in 10 years, these are not at risk because politicians are getting bolder, they are at risk because our convictions are getting colder.”

Which I liked very much. In sharing it the statement was made that it is not our convictions getting colder, rather they are becoming more ‘enlightened’.

I was taken back, but after reading this I suppose that statement is true:

“…Enlightenment movement, which began in France about 300 years ago as an attempt to create a society without God.

Suddenly ‘enlightenment’ has a whole new meaning to me. :frowning:


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