Freeze-drying touted as new green burial

DEAD bodies could be freeze-dried, shaken to a fine powder and used as compost under proposals to introduce a new, more eco-friendly method of corpse disposal to the UK.

The process, which is known as promession, has been developed in Sweden and aims to address the shortage of burial spaces and reduce the mercury pollution created by dental fillings during cremation.

A spokesman for the Church of Scotland said: “There do not appear to be any theological implications with this method of disposal, but it sounds like an appropriate thing from an environmental viewpoint.”

Professor (Emeritus) Kenyon Mason, an expert in forensic medicine and pathology, medical law and medical ethics, said: “So long as you don’t interfere with public health and safety, there are very few rules and there is nothing to stop you burying your aunt at the bottom of the garden if you wish.”

[quote=Ahimsa]DEAD bodies could be freeze-dried, shaken to a fine powder and used as compost under proposals to introduce a new, more eco-friendly method of corpse disposal to the UK.

The process, which is known as promession, has been developed in Sweden and aims to address the shortage of burial spaces and reduce the mercury pollution created by dental fillings during cremation.

A spokesman for the Church of Scotland said: “There do not appear to be any theological implications with this method of disposal, but it sounds like an appropriate thing from an environmental viewpoint.”

Professor (Emeritus) Kenyon Mason, an expert in forensic medicine and pathology, medical law and medical ethics, said: “So long as you don’t interfere with public health and safety, there are very few rules and there is nothing to stop you burying your aunt at the bottom of the garden if you wish.”
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:eek:

Where is the respect for the dignity of the human person.

One step closer to Soilent Green.

A surprising admission from the Institute for Social Ecology in Vermont:

social-ecology.org/article.php?story=20031202115218246

This is old news that must have just caught the attention of a media outlet. Sweden has been developing this process for at least a decade.

Another process that has begun to be used is caustic hydrolosis. The body is placed under high heat and pressure with steam and caustic soda. The body is liquified and sent to the waste water treatment plant. All that remains is sterile bones that are dried, crushed and given to the family.

Both processes are no different than cremation, it is the same chemistry in which the body is reduced to carbon dioxide and water. It will take the Church and society a while to embrace such technology, but they will in due time.

Nohome

Although I wouldn’t want to freeze-dry my loved one, I don’t see how this is at all like soilent green. That involved eating people. This involves dealing with a corpse after death. It is ashes to ashes and dust to dust, after all. We aren’t like the ancient Egyptians . We can cremate as well.

[quote=Nohome]This is old news that must have just caught the attention of a media outlet. Sweden has been developing this process for at least a decade.

Another process that has begun to be used is caustic hydrolosis. The body is placed under high heat and pressure with steam and caustic soda. The body is liquified and sent to the waste water treatment plant. All that remains is sterile bones that are dried, crushed and given to the family.

Both processes are no different than cremation, it is the same chemistry in which the body is reduced to carbon dioxide and water. It will take the Church and society a while to embrace such technology, but they will in due time.

Nohome
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Wait just a second:eek: After the body is liquified it is sent to a waste water treatment plant???And what is that water then used for???:eek: :nope:

Someone be learning how to treat bodies from serial killers. :banghead:

[quote=Lisa4Catholics]Wait just a second:eek: After the body is liquified it is sent to a waste water treatment plant???And what is that water then used for???:eek: :nope:
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After the water is treated, it is just water. All water is recycled, unless you live WAY up stream. The shower you took this morning and the water you just drank was likely part of a living system at some other point in time. It is said that the Mississippi is used seven times before it reaches the delta.

The people of India have been burning their dead and casting the remains upon the Ganges (sp?) river for ever. They also bathe and drink from the same river. Your horror is purely cultural.

Nohome

[quote=abcdefg]Someone be learning how to treat bodies from serial killers. :banghead:
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Actually, in Western culture, most serial killers bury the remains of their victims unless they desire the attention of the media brought on by discovery of the body. To my knowledge, no serial killers have freeze dried or hydrolyzed their victims.

Remember that the Church used to ban cremation. This is because some of the Churches enemies (like the Masons) used to scatter their ashes in contempt of the belief in a bodily resurection. Now, so long as the cremains are buried, the Church accepts the practice. I see the same happening for other technologies.

Nohome

[quote=Nohome]The people of India have been burning their dead and casting the remains upon the Ganges (sp?) river for ever. They also bathe and drink from the same river.
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Which is probably where Cholera, among other, diseases originated. Today there is some suspicion funeral practices in India were responsible for outbreaks of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy and Creutzfeldt Jakob disease in the UK. Contraversial report released on it last month but the connection is not outside the realm of possibility.

Your horror is purely cultural.

So? Culture and tradition are important. They are the glue which holds civilization together. Providing they aren’t a health risk as in the case in parts of Asia and Africa.

I know many wish to create a modern man unburdened with the baggage of the past, but much of what has been touted as “progress” in the last century turned out to be antihuman. Solidariaty between generations, alive and deceased is not a bad thing at all. The very people who often demand westerners give up their traditions are the ones who praise the traditions (Hindu funeral practices for instance) of other cultures.

I don’t think that spreading ashes on the Ganges causes Mad Cow Disease or cholera. People bathing in the Ganges and disposing of untreated waste-water in the Ganges definitely causes cholera. Ashes do not spread disease, but dead corpses floating in the water do.

The problem is cremations aren’t complete. Haven’t been there in a while and I’m sure it’s better now but in Bombay, trucks would make rounds in the morning to pick up bodies off the streets.

No one knows for sure where Cholera started but the epidemics which plagued the west for centuries usually followed the same route: India, Iran, Turkey, Italy, France and USA. New York was hit hard in the first half of the 19th century after outbreaks had occurred first in those regions

From Yale University:

The cradle of cholera’s numerous visitations in the 19th century can be traced to the banks of the Ganges River where the Cholera bacillus had been thriving for centuries in its warm waters and the intestines of its neighborly human hosts…continued here

From Der Spiegel:

This Hindu funeral ritual is performed hundreds of times a day along the banks of the Ganges River . . .In many cases, this practice results in half-cremated corpses floating down the Ganges. Until recently, environmental groups have been the only ones concerned about the practice. But now, two British researchers have presented a bizarre-sounding theory that may prompt Western infectious disease experts to turn their attention to the Hindu cult of death.

In an article published in The Lancet, a medical journal, researchers Alan and Nancy Colchester write that dead Hindus in the Ganges could very well have triggered Mad Cow Disease in Europe . . .continued here

I brought up India to make a point that we live in contact with the remains of our dead. Back to hydrolysis:

Here in America, the blood of bodies embalmed at the local mortuary goes down the drain untreated and nobody gives a rip because the practice has been embraced by our culture. The liquid sent down the sewer from a hydrolysis system is completely sterile but it gives people the willies. The remains handed over to the family are no different than what you get from cremation. The difference is that the organic carbon goes down the drain rather than up the stack. Those who find the practice objectionable should quit breathing because at least some of the CO2 we inhale comes from cremation.

You may read about it here:

WR2 Hydrolysis

Nohome

[quote=David_Paul]Culture and tradition are important. They are the glue which holds civilization together. Providing they aren’t a health risk as in the case in parts of Asia and Africa.
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Or a risk to our environment by eating up precious land for cemetaries.

[quote=David_Paul]Solidariaty between generations, alive and deceased is not a bad thing at all.
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While I can’t disagree, why must it involve expensive and wasteful preservation of a corpse and permanent use of land? In the end, whatever method of internment is used, the body is reduced to water and carbon dioxide with the exception of the mineral content. Modern methods simply speed up the process.

[quote=David_Paul] The very people who often demand westerners give up their traditions are the ones who praise the traditions (Hindu funeral practices for instance) of other cultures.
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I’ve never met these people. I for one would like to see all faiths embrace body internments that are good for the environment. Freeze dried compost and hydrolysis both provide protection of human health and the environment while still providing the living with remains to return to the Earth.

Nohome

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