Friends Don't Let Friends Study Latin Alone!

:slight_smile:
I’m a seminarian who took a year off. I’ll serve in a parish this summer and return to seminary this fall. Meanwhile, I’m boning up on Latin for my Research Master’s. (Something on the breviary…) Anyone else learning Latin now? (Or, any Latin Masters care to take on a novice?) I’d appreciate the company.
Also interested in philosophy, poetry, fiction, and music…
Mark

I’m just starting Latin now, as well, thanks to the absolutely GREAT advice on good self-learning material that was posted here last month.

This is a great place to talk with like-minded Catholics. Welcome.

Great hearing from you. What was the GREAT post last month (on self-study Latin material)? I missed it! I just heard from a freind in New Orleans (where I attend seminary) and he’s gathering my Latin books to ship me here in Florida.
What books (or other materials) are you using?
Mark

scriabin,

Do you have any idea where that post went too? Or a way to search on it here? I at least want to get proficient enough to attend a Tridentine Latin Mass. Thanks for your help…

-Mike D

Mike,
If you find out about that great post, let me know! I’ve been to a Tridentine Mass. (St. Patrick’s in New Orleans offers one every Sunday morning. At least, it did pre-Katrina and I assume it still does, though I haven’t been there since the hurricane.) There’s a Latin/English booklet in parishes that offer such Masses, though I don’t know where to buy one. Time to Google, I guess…
I hope to SAY a Tridentine Mass someday!
God bless,
Mark

[quote=mark_e_rhodes]:slight_smile:
I’m a seminarian who took a year off. I’ll serve in a parish this summer and return to seminary this fall. Meanwhile, I’m boning up on Latin for my Research Master’s. (Something on the breviary…) Anyone else learning Latin now? (Or, any Latin Masters care to take on a novice?) I’d appreciate the company.
Also interested in philosophy, poetry, fiction, and music…
Mark
[/quote]

First advice to “serious students of Latin who (I am guessing) are younger than I”: From my rubbing elbows of Latin teachers (mostly high school level) over the years, I am told that the greatest obstacle their students face is: They don’t know *English. *That is: Latin is generally taught through rigid grammar lessons, et cetera, and high school students today are ill-prepared wrt English grammar, as compared with students of years gone by. (If you don’t know what a participle is in English, how can you expect to understand its use in Latin?) So: If you (any of you) feel similarly ill-prepared in this respect, find some way to bone up on English grammar (a book, a tutor, continuing education at community college, et cetera).

(Aside: And perhaps this is an older problem than I am letting on, when I speak of students “my age”. In restrospect, I recognize that at my (minor seminary) high school, the freshman English curriculum did precisely this, and perhaps was designed to do so in part to mesh with the Latin curriculum?)

What text will you be using in seminary? I would guess either Collins’s *Ecclesiastical Latin *or *Wheelock’s Latin. *There is a mailing list called LatinStudy that periodically runs a course through both of these works (as well as others). Wheelock courses start perhaps 3 or 4 times per year and last about 2 years. Collins starts once per year and lasts 16 months or so. It is about to start a new Collins course, 17-March-2006, details here: Collins2006 Ecclesisastical Latin Study Group. This is a cooperative study model, where many people and groups share the one list, and translation assigments are collated and shared. It helps to subscribe ahead of time to get used to the volume/size of messages, and perhaps tune your mail filters to narrow it down to the traffic you are interested in. There are rarely absolute right or wrong answers, but there are also many helpful people of whom you can ask questions.

tee

[quote=tee_eff_em]First advice to “serious students of Latin who (I am guessing) are younger than I”: From my rubbing elbows of Latin teachers (mostly high school level) over the years, I am told that the greatest obstacle their students face is: They don’t know *English. *That is: Latin is generally taught through rigid grammar lessons, et cetera, and high school students today are ill-prepared wrt English grammar, as compared with students of years gone by. (If you don’t know what a participle is in English, how can you expect to understand its use in Latin?) So: If you (any of you) feel similarly ill-prepared in this respect, find some way to bone up on English grammar (a book, a tutor, continuing education at community college, et cetera).

[/quote]

When I was in college we used the book English Grammar for Students of Latin by Norma Goldman and Ladislas Szymanski. Another excellent resource is entitled A Latin Grammar by William Gardner Hale and Carl Darling Buck. We used this frequently enough that it was simply referred to as our Hale & Buck.

In looking around to prepare for going to a Tridentine Mass or two, I found this Missal:

baroniuspress.com/missal/daily_missal_1962.htm

I got it off a Catholic Press site. It seems great for at least first learning the Mass. I’m going to strive for this first, then work on learning Latin as a whole.

Hi there,
the other day I came across an interactive latin course on the website for the National Archives in Great Britain - it is aimed at people who want to be able to read old documents so the emphasis is on “church” latin from medieval times.
I did a beginners course in latin a few years ago and intend to do another course atthe next level next year, and this course on the internet has been very useful in going through the basics again. I would recommend it.
The address is nationalarchives.gov.uk/latin/beginners/

Good luck! :thumbsup:

[quote=mark_e_rhodes]:slight_smile:
I’m a seminarian who took a year off. I’ll serve in a parish this summer and return to seminary this fall. Meanwhile, I’m boning up on Latin for my Research Master’s. (Something on the breviary…) Anyone else learning Latin now? (Or, any Latin Masters care to take on a novice?) I’d appreciate the company.
Also interested in philosophy, poetry, fiction, and music…
Mark
[/quote]

I have taken a few semesters of classical latin so I have a decent knowledge of it. I would like to go over it with you.

Nice to see so many responses to my original post. I’m still searching web sites for different approaches while awaiting a shipment of Latin materials (Collins’ PRIMER, a dictionary, some fairy tales, a few other things). Meanwhile, I’m memorizing the five declensions of nouns, the conjugations of verbs, and learning more prayers in Latin. (I say the Rosary in Latin daily now.)
My apologies for the abbreviated response. Anyone who wants to discuss Latin further (-compare notes, commiserate) may e-mail me directly. Thanks.
Mark

To all who have posted on this thread, thank you!
Should anyone wish to compare notes via e-mail, feel free to send me one. I’m learning the Gospel Canticles for the Liturgy of the Hours in Latin as well as wrestling with the third declension of nouns. Ugh! But I’m excited at the prospect of some day reading my patron (Aquinas) in Latin! Not to mention the Vulgate…
Mark

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