Funeral Mass or Memorial Mass?


#1

A very good friend of many many years passed away last July 10th. She will be cremated and her family have asked me to announce that a Mass will be held a few days after they get her cremains from the funeral home.

The Mass will be held in her parish church with her cremains in an urn.

Before I inform mutual friends, should I call this a Funeral Mass or a Memorial Mass? Her ashes will eventually be brought to her place of birth (overseas) so she can be interred with her siblings and father who have passed before her.

Can anyone clarify this, please? Thank you.


#2

[quote="broadwaykid, post:1, topic:333031"]
A very good friend of many many years passed away last July 10th. She will be cremated and her family have asked me to announce that a Mass will be held a few days after they get her cremains from the funeral home.

The Mass will be held in her parish church with her cremains in an urn.

Before I inform mutual friends, should I call this a Funeral Mass or a Memorial Mass? Her ashes will eventually be brought to her place of birth (overseas) so she can be interred with her siblings and father who have passed before her.

Can anyone clarify this, please? Thank you.

[/quote]

It would be a Memorial mass. If there would have been a mass before she was creamated with the body in a casket it would be a funeral mass. Which is the prefered processdure by the church.

Deacon Frank


#3

[quote="broadwaykid, post:1, topic:333031"]
A very good friend of many many years passed away last July 10th. She will be cremated and her family have asked me to announce that a Mass will be held a few days after they get her cremains from the funeral home.

The Mass will be held in her parish church with her cremains in an urn.

Before I inform mutual friends, should I call this a Funeral Mass or a Memorial Mass? Her ashes will eventually be brought to her place of birth (overseas) so she can be interred with her siblings and father who have passed before her.

Can anyone clarify this, please? Thank you.

[/quote]

Beyond the technicality, would it matter to your friends, or anyone for that matter?


#4

[quote="broadwaykid, post:1, topic:333031"]
A very good friend of many many years passed away last July 10th. She will be cremated and her family have asked me to announce that a Mass will be held a few days after they get her cremains from the funeral home.

The Mass will be held in her parish church with her cremains in an urn.

Before I inform mutual friends, should I call this a Funeral Mass or a Memorial Mass? Her ashes will eventually be brought to her place of birth (overseas) so she can be interred with her siblings and father who have passed before her.

Can anyone clarify this, please? Thank you.

[/quote]

If this is in the US, it can be a Funeral Mass. Here is the reference from the USCCB.

usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/liturgical-resources/cremation/cremation-and-funerals.cfm


#5

[quote="broadwaykid, post:1, topic:333031"]
A very good friend of many many years passed away last July 10th. She will be cremated and her family have asked me to announce that a Mass will be held a few days after they get her cremains from the funeral home.

The Mass will be held in her parish church with her cremains in an urn.

Before I inform mutual friends, should I call this a Funeral Mass or a Memorial Mass? Her ashes will eventually be brought to her place of birth (overseas) so she can be interred with her siblings and father who have passed before her.

Can anyone clarify this, please? Thank you.

[/quote]

If the remains are present, then it will possibly be a funeral Mass---it depends upon whether or not the priest will be doing the funeral ritual. Check with the priest (or possibly a family member who already knows the answer).

Given the circumstances you've described it might be either a funeral Mass or a Mass for the Dead, but the presence of the remains (even though cremated) leans toward a funeral Mass.


#6

I am just trying to do right by the deceased and her family. Please be respectful.


#7

[quote="FrDavid96, post:5, topic:333031"]
If the remains are present, then it will possibly be a funeral Mass---it depends upon whether or not the priest will be doing the funeral ritual. Check with the priest (or possibly a family member who already knows the answer).

Given the circumstances you've described it might be either a funeral Mass or a Mass for the Dead, but the presence of the remains (even though cremated) leans toward a funeral Mass.

[/quote]

Thank you everyone who gave a constructive reply. Your help is greatly appreciated.


#8

Thank you for your reply.


#9

Thank you to everyone who gave a constructive reply. It is a difficult time for all of us.


#10

[quote="broadwaykid, post:6, topic:333031"]
I am just trying to do right by the deceased and her family. Please be respectful.

[/quote]

Certainly no disrespect was intended...however pointing out that its a memorial mass and not a funeral mass may cause undue anxiety on the very people you are try ing to show compassion.


#11

Good point. I will be attending such a Mass tomorrow morning for a dear friend of the family.


#12

Okay, so I attended a Mass this morning for said deceased. I understand the Church has accepted cremation, perhaps reluctantly, but to have the priest incessing the ashes was a little bit too much for me. My brother who had flown in for the memorial/funeral was taken aback as well.


#13

[quote="ProVobis, post:12, topic:333031"]
Okay, so I attended a Mass this morning for said deceased. I understand the Church has accepted cremation, perhaps reluctantly, but to have the priest incessing the ashes was a little bit too much for me. My brother who had flown in for the memorial/funeral was taken aback as well.

[/quote]

Why would incensing the remains be too much for you? Even though the remains are now ashes, they are still the remains of the deceased and must be treated with dignity.


#14

Okay, I see your point. But is incensing (with burning coals) an already burnt body the best way to dignify that person? I guess I was just looking at the symbolism. Forgive me but this is all new to me.


#15

[quote="ProVobis, post:14, topic:333031"]
Okay, I see your point. But is incensing (with burning coals) an already burnt body the best way to dignify that person? I guess I was just looking at the symbolism. Forgive me but this is all new to me.

[/quote]

I am so sorry for your loss. May God give you strength and consolation during this difficult time.


#16

[quote="CradleJourney, post:15, topic:333031"]
I am so sorry for your loss. May God give you strength and consolation during this difficult time.

[/quote]

Thank you.


#17

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