Funeral slide shows


#1

I recently attended a non-religious funeral at which a slide show of the deceased’s life was projected onto a large screen. I know of two Catholic funerals where the same thing happened. I find the whole practice gimmicky and vulgar. Is this some new fad promoted by morticians?
Perhaps I am getting old, but I am only 80!:confused:


#2

I attended a Presbyterian funeral a few years ago that had a slide show. I thought it was a nice gesture. If the family feels a need for it, I don’t see the problem. I would object to it during the actual funeral mass, but other than that, if it helps the loved ones in their grief, who am I to say its wrong.


#3

I like the practice, but it’s completely unappropriate during Mass. It’s fine during the wake or funeral luncheon or whatever is customary for a get-together.


#4

I’ve seen this at viewings at the funeral home, but I’ve never seen it at Mass or even at the church. I didn’t see anything wrong in the times I witnessed it.
I guess it’s supposed to be a celebration of the good memories of the person’s life.


#5

I think that’s wonderful idea for the funeral, or the viewing! What a great way to remember the person.


#6

I've only seen it at Protestant funerals - either before the service or during the reception after. I like it. It's a great way to remember people.


#7

I’ve seen a slide show at most of the wakes or viewings I’ve attended for the past 5-8 years or so. I think it has become quite common. I think it is nice to look back and remember the person throughout his/her life. However, it sounds like the slide show took place during the actual funeral that you attended? If so, I don’t think that was at all appropriate.


#8

Yes, I think it is gimmicky and vulgar, and I would not want it at my funeral. However, if I was attending someone else’s funeral and there was a slide show at, say, the funeral home, I wouldn’t say anything. If it was at a Mass or some other liturgy, however, I would be left with a bad taste in my mouth.


#9

[quote="Kosmos, post:1, topic:333546"]
I recently attended a non-religious funeral at which a slide show of the deceased's life was projected onto a large screen. I know of two Catholic funerals where the same thing happened. I find the whole practice gimmicky and vulgar. Is this some new fad promoted by morticians?
Perhaps I am getting old, but I am only 80!:confused:

[/quote]

If it was a non-religious funeral then it was no doubt a celebration and remembrance of the person's life. Showing pictures of a person's life seems to be the current means of celebrating ANYTHING right now. I don't know that we can really say what is appropriate for non-religious and non-Catholic funerals so long as they don't outright disrespect the deceased.
I don't know if morticians suggest this or not but I'm pretty sure the family does all the work so I doubt the morticians profit by it. (Not unless, perhaps, the funeral homes rent easels.)

If it is a Catholic funeral I would not consider it appropriate during the Mass.

But almost every funeral I go to now has a and easel with a poster board of pictures of the deceased in the narthex near the flowers and guestbook. It wouldn't really bother me if that was a laptop in slideshow mode. The pictures, guestbook, and flowers end up getting moved to the reception following the funeral (if there is one).

I don't know if morticians suggest this or not but I'm pretty sure the family does all the work so I doubt the morticians profit by it. (Not unless, perhaps, the funeral homes rent easels.)


#10

I doubt if morticians suggest it. When our mother died, my sisters and I made a couple of poster board photo collages and also displayed one of Mom’s paintings. When Daddy died, we had just 1 display of pictures, but one of my sisters made a shadow box of all of Daddy’s WWII medals.

We thought up these ideas all by ourselves! Mainly, we wanted to be able to share memories of our parents with extended family and friends. I think that’s what is behind the slide shows. I also think it’s the modern technology that is bothering some people, not the actual sharing of pictures.


#11

I’ve seen displays of pictures at the entrance of the church before/after the funeral mass and I’ve seen the slide shows at the funeral home before, not during, Liturgy of the Word services at the funeral home. Sometimes we display a picture of the deceased next to an urn if their cremains are present for the funeral in church. We have the ability to do slide shows during mass at the church I usually attend in my parish, such as during a homily or eulogy but I don’t think that would fly with our pastor, fortunately.


#12

In he 60s Bill Cosby did a stand-up comedy routine on recording about “Death.” He made the comment about when visitors go to view the body they often say “Doesn’t he look like himself?” He then speculated on what would happen if the funeral director rigged up a tape recorder of the dead person’s voice saying as each person files past the coffin, “Hello, glad you are here. Don’t I look like myself? Aren’t I wonderful?”:slight_smile:


#13

My thoughts exactly.


#14

Vulgar is an awfully strong word. Why do you have a problem with it? They did this at my grandma’s funeral luncheon and I thought it was very nice. They even gave family members who wanted one a copy of the disk so that they could have digital copies of the pictures. I really liked that because I didn’t have any pictures of my dad and his family when he was young.

I’ve also seen a similar slideshow at a cousin’s wedding. They showed pictures of the bride and groom growing up as children and then pictures of them as an engaged couple. They played schmultzy music in the background and all the mothers and aunties were crying. Of course, this was done at the reception and not during the actual wedding.


#15

[quote="PatriceA, post:2, topic:333546"]
I attended a Presbyterian funeral a few years ago that had a slide show. I thought it was a nice gesture. If the family feels a need for it, I don't see the problem. I would object to it during the actual funeral mass, but other than that, if it helps the loved ones in their grief, who am I to say its wrong.

[/quote]

Agreed. When you really get down to brass tacks, the funeral is for the living. It is a way to guide the grieving process and help them through the early days after a loved one's death. If a slide show helps them, I'm all for it.


#16

I think that the appropriate place for this would be at the wake the evening before or at the reception after the Mass.


#17

Not really my cup of tea, but if it provides the deceased’s family and friends comfort I don’t see the harm in it either.


#18

Why on earth would people find it vulgar? That’s a holier than you reacation and it what drives me nuts about this place at times.

When my Grandma passed away last November, there was a slide show at the funeral home during visitation and the prayer service and following the funeral in the Parish Hall during the luncheon. Not once did I think it was “vulgar” or inappropriate.


#19

[quote="garn9173, post:18, topic:333546"]
Why on earth would people find it vulgar? That's a holier than you reacation and it what drives me nuts about this place at times.

When my Grandma passed away last November, there was a slide show at the funeral home during visitation and the prayer service and following the funeral in the Parish Hall during the luncheon. Not once did I think it was "vulgar" or inappropriate.

[/quote]

I don't think it is vulgar either and I like to look at those photos at the funeral home, but I understand that people are different and they also have different customs and ideas. I once was involved in a discussion here on CAF regarding taking photos of the deceased in the casket, (and maybe also touching and kissing the deceased in the casket too, I think). I find the idea of taking photos odd, but some don't, they find it customary. So, we are all different, with different life experiences and expectations. :)


#20

I’ve seen this at the funeral home, and in another room --NOT the room where the wake was taking place.

Did you see this in church, or was this at the funeral home ?


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