Gangs of London viewers outside UK call for subtitles as they can't understand British accents

Surely they are having a bubble, can’t understand the way Londoners speak. Leave it out son, that’s not Kosher. These people need to sort it out. They need to learn to distinguish the varieties of English that come from our north and souths in the UK. I don’t Adam and Eve it.

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Hey I can speak London English. Bubble and squeak! :grinning:

Leave it out son, do you want some. You ain’t no Greek. Well maybe you are actually for all I know.

I always find it funny when people say “British accent”. It’s like saying American accent, it’s not specific enough.

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For a variation and as rhyming slang is really only used rarely or in little bits here and there I shall drop into ‘roadman’ speech.

That’s some bare stupid article brethren. They chatting some pure nonsense, they need to fix up and educate themselves.

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No Greek but I have some Swedish if that helps :thinking:

Indeed, even in London there are shed loads of accents.

Don’t feel bad. I had to use subtitles to watch both The Full Monty and O Brother, Where Art Thou?. I found both Yorkshire and 1930s Mississippi accents utterly impenetrable. To this day there are parts of southern Appalachia where some people, particularly males, simply cannot be understood (except perhaps by each other).

And before anybody accuses me of promoting an “indecent” film, TFM was far more about how unemployed, demoralized working men dealt with their predicament, and the social dynamics of it all. The men’s strip show was just a plot device. I did not find the final 10 seconds of the film particularly obscene. You will see far “worse” walking through any sculpture museum.

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Gangs of London? Sounds like a sequel to Gangs of New York :grin:

Nah, Gangs of New York is the sequel to Gangs of Great Britain and Ireland who emigrated. It’s a bit over the top, I watched a bit. The acting is decent enough but the fighting feels a bit ridiculous and choreographed at points and the amount of firepower the gangs have at their disposal is a bit ludicrous at times. One sequence which involves a very, very large number of assault rifles and weapons was pushing credibility very, very hard.

I was watching “Buddy vs. Duff” last night and that insufferable pastry chef with the French accent, Florian Bellanger, was judging the competition and they had to put up subtitles when he was making comments.

And has anyone watched “Swamp People”? Most of those 'gator hunters have such thick Cajun accents that they show uses subtitles for them!

Yes, even in England - even a few miles down the road the accent could be different. Of my 3 English grandparents, one spoke in Received Pronunciation, one had a Birmingham accent and one has a sort of Yorkshire accent.

RP is not geographically limited but is found all around England, Wales, Scotland, and even sometimes among the descendants of Brits in Ireland.

I was very confused when I found out Tony Blair was born in Scotland.

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Regional accents are, I can only assume, universal…every language of any significant geographic distribution will have various dialects, and within each dialect, local accents / variation.
My uncle has a slightly different accent from my dad, his brother. He’s retained (or affected?) a Northern BC rural manner of speaking, while my dad comes across as a lot more urban in his speech.

I haven’t seen Gangs of London, but I experienced something similar when I went to see They Shall Not Grow Old (great movie!) with a buddy here in the midwestern US. His biggest complaint was that he could only understand about 70% of the dialogue. I got virtually all of it; 20 years of watching EastEnders apparently paid off.

I do love that EE has taught me some British idioms, such as taking coals to Newcastle.

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Born there, but he spent much of his youth in Durham.

That is indeed a great movie. There is a similar colorized project of footage from the Irish revolutionary period:-

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I usually do okay with British and Irish films, TV shows, and accents, but the one movie that really flummoxed me was “Kes”. I could not understand most of what was said, especially in the scene where all the different workmen and their wives are at some party and they are being interviewed. I watched that scene four or five times and I just couldn’t get it. I have managed to follow dozens of other British films (I love the gangster, spy, kitchen sink drama, and rock n’ roll/ mods/ glitter/ etc movies), TV series including Eastenders, sitcoms, documentaries etc just fine, including several other films by director Loach, but just could not understand that one. Fortunately it was such a miserable film I will never want or need to watch it again.

Edited to add, here is an example, I can understand only about every other sentence in this scene

Let’s see how people get on with this!

Another one:-

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