Gay patient says Catholic chaplain refused him last rites

I hope this isn’t behind the paywall:

washingtonpost.com/local/gay-patient-says-catholic-chaplain-refused-him-last-rites/2014/02/19/35d163f6-99b1-11e3-80ac-63a8ba7f7942_story.html?hpid=z4

A Catholic chaplain at MedStar Washington Hospital Center stopped delivering a 63-year-old heart attack patient Communion prayers and last rites after the man said he was gay, the patient said Wednesday, describing a dramatic bedside scene starting with him citing Pope Francis and ending with him swearing at the cleric.

I don’t know what to think of these things.

I don’t know what happened, and Father Coehlo can’t let us know…but if Mr. Plishka did not have remorse for any homosexual activity, then Father could not give absolution.

If I had gone to confession and said, “I missed Mass most of the time for 20 years, but I’m not really sorry” I wouldn’t get absolution either.

He sure sounds unrepentant to me, which means no absolution.

In Washington, DC, priests are not allowed to refuse communion to anyone, so this is confusing. From the man’s telling of the story, I am not sure what he wanted. I mean, he thought he might die, but persisted in defending his “lifestyle”.

Catholic priests do not give Holy Communion to publicly manifest sinners when there is a possibility of scandal. This is universal.

Would like to know if he gave his confession first and said he was living the gay lifestyle and wasn’t going to quit.

The Holy Father’s famous quote from last year was “If someone is gay and he searches for the Lord and has good will, who am I to judge?”

Many people are quick to mention the “Who am I to judge?” part but conveniently forget the “searches for the Lord and has good will” part. Francis did not imply that the Church is going to lighten up on gay marriage and such. Following the teachings of Christ would certainly preclude homosexuality.

If you sin mortally and don’t repent then you can’t receive the sacraments. That is something every Catholic should now.

He said that he was homosexual, but it didn’t really say anywhere if he was practicing or not. So, I’m a little confused about that. Obviously, if he was practicing and unrepentant, then he could not receive Holy Communion. However, if it was just because the guy was homosexual and still chaste, then it’s not good at all.

At the end of the article, he said something about “active participant,” so maybe he is practicing and living in sin. In that case, what the priest did was right and no one should be arguing about it.

What a horribly private thing to make into a news story. We sholdn’t know anything about this. It’s between the man and God and the priest and God. Only God knows who was right/wrong and God has the final say with regards to forgiveness.

Plishka said that a few days after the incident he called the Basilica of the National Shrine, where he has attended Sunday noon Mass for at least a decade. He didn’t know any priests but asked for one on duty to call him back, Plishka said. The priest agreed with the chaplain, Plishka said.

“He said, he can’t give you [Communion] if you continue that lifestyle, if you’re an active participant,” he said.

And the fact that according to Mr. Plishka, the priest at the Basilica agreed with Father Coehlo points to a situation where there was not contrition expressed and therefore no absolution.

Perhaps the de facto reality the way Fr. Guarnizo and Nancy Pelosi have been treated, but obviously not de jure based on any sane person’s reading of Canon 915.

Good afternoon, PaulinVA,

The gays are so detached from moral reality because of all the Gay Rights propaganda propagated by the mainstream media. We don’t even know if Plishka were a confirmed Catholic or just an unconfirmed man who liked to go to mass. We are led to assume that he was a confirmed Catholic. I’m willing to go along with the priest.

God loves you,
Don

Why can’t he let us know? Reporters are trying to get his side of the story but he is choosing not to even give a statement.
One sentence through official channels via the person who handles media for that dioscese could clear up the entire matter.

Where does he sound unrepentant?

This man was an altar boy until age 18, he went to mass every Sunday, he talks about having “good will”, he believes in the sacraments he says, so he probably was a regular confession-goer. It sounds like he was very much “searching” within the Catholic framework.
Many people–probably most–are “sinners” until that last moment…isn’t that the whole point about last rites?
Heavens…serial killers who have brutally murdered people get their last rites.

Where in the articles does he “persist” in defending some sort of “lifestyle”?
Being homosexual is not a “lifestyle” fyi. According to the CC…it is a “deep seated tendency”.

I thought the moment of “judging” was up to God and happened between the dying person and God.

.

That news article definitely does not tell the whole story. And, frankly, we don’t need to know the whole story.

Priests generally don’t withhold the sacraments from people willy-nilly. I’m sure the bishop will handle it with his priest if that turned out to be the case.

That’s a gigantic leap of logic. I too was an altar boy. In high school, if you asked me, I would probably say I believed in the sacraments. Yet for decades I hardly went to confession, and I received the Eucharist unworthily all the time. I was poorly catechized and nobody ever told me of the importance thereof. This man is of the correct age to be similarly catechized, so why should we expect him to frequent confession? It probably was hardly offered in the parishes where he went.

Where in the articles does he “persist” in defending some sort of “lifestyle”?
Being homosexual is not a “lifestyle” fyi. According to the CC…it is a “deep seated tendency”.

We are applying some measure of speculation here, we don’t know that he persists in obstinate sin, but this is legal language. We might infer that if he was denied the sacraments, that the priest determined he was persisting in a lifestyle. Being homosexual is a lifestyle, just ask any homosexual. It’s popularly termed an “alternative lifestyle”. Having same-sex attraction is not the same thing, it’s a mere precursor. SSA is intrinsically disordered while persisting in a lifestyle is obstinate grave sin.

I thought the moment of “judging” was up to God and happened between the dying person and God.
.

The moment of judging comes in the confessional when the priest acts in persona Christi. The Sacrament of Penance is a juridical act involving Christ, the Church, and the penitent. The priest sits as judge of the penitent’s sins and actions. The priest is able to give counsel and make decisions based on his knowledge of this person’s confession. It is privileged knowledge and it is a privileged position given by the Church by virtue of his ordination. The priest is entirely within his rights to withhold absolution and withhold the other sacraments (except possibly not in the Archdiocese of Washington, DC as has been pointed out). Jesus is the final and ultimate Judge of mankind and priests do not have the power to condemn anyone to Hell, but they do have the power to forgive and absolve or withhold those graces, by virtue of the authority of the Keys of the Kingdom given to Peter and the Apostles.

This is a uniquely hypocritical thing emerging in the media these days. The homosexualists hate the Church and what she stands for. They want nothing more than to tear her down and watch her doctrines crumble. Yet at the same time they demand the Holy Mysteries from the anointed hands of priests. They covet that which they cannot have in their sin. They recognize that everyone needs the sacraments in this life. They are an abusive husband who cannot live without his wife. When the wife shows a little backbone and denies him the love he craves, she suffers abuse and hatred. In our misogynistic culture, it is the wife who will be persecuted for her behavior. It is the wife who will be blamed and denigrated, thrown in prison and tortured for not giving the husband what he wants. But it is the wife who is without sin, and the wife who will prevail in the end. Justice is coming, and not a moment too soon.

The priest can’t discuss it or “even give a statement” because it happened in the context of Confession. The priest is bound by the Confessional seal. The man who went to the reporters is not. So one side of the story is all they will get.

Sounds like a plant to me

The priest cannot discuss anything revealed under the Seal of the Confessional.

Where does he sound unrepentant?

Where he says:“I’ve tried to be a decent person all my life. I’m not perfect, believe me. And I wouldn’t wish [being gay] on anyone. But you can’t be somebody you’re not. Otherwise you’ll end up 63 and alone,” he said.IOW, he’d rather be with a human being in a sinful relationship than with Christ, Who died for him.

This man was an altar boy until age 18, he went to mass every Sunday, he talks about having “good will”, he believes in the sacraments he says, so he probably was a regular confession-goer. It sounds like he was very much “searching” within the Catholic framework.
Many people–probably most–are “sinners” until that last moment…isn’t that the whole point about last rites?

The operative word here being until. IOW, one is supposed to *repent *in order to be forgiven. If someone hurt you and then said, Well, I’m sorry but I’m gonna do it again, wouldn’t you suspect that they weren’t all that sorry?

Heavens…serial killers who have brutally murdered people get their last rites.

If they are repentant or unconscious.

Peryaps you do not understand that only repented sins can be forgiven and absolved? How can a sin the sinner holds onto and plans to keep be forgiven or absolved?

EDTED to complete response… :o

Where in the articles does he “persist” in defending some sort of “lifestyle”?
Being homosexual is not a “lifestyle” fyi. According to the CC…it is a “deep seated tendency”.

The acts are also called homosexual. There are 2 places in the article which indicate that he plans to continue in his sinfulness.

I thought the moment of “judging” was up to God and happened between the dying person and God.

.

This is a different thing altogther. Confession is not the particular or the general judgement; it is a sacrament for while we still are living and the priest acts *in persona Christi. *

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