"Gay Worshippers Find Special Meaning in Easter"

This may be the wrong forum. If it is, I hope the moderators will move it. I guess it could work in the Spirituality forum. My main concern with the topic, in this particular case, is the example of what can happen with “private interpretation” of Scripture, not to mention having a free-for-all for constructing theology:

The Rev. Jim Mitulski says no week tells the story of his life as a gay man quite like Easter.

The story begins with Palm Sunday, Jesus’ jaunty entry into Jerusalem, where people placed their cloaks and tree branches on his path to welcome him. **For Mitulski, it feels like a gay pride parade **- a public and political celebration beyond government control.

Holy Week then evokes a broader and deeper arc of gay life, Mitulski says, from violations of Jesus’ due process and a Last Supper with outcasts like him, to betrayals by those closest to him, his crucifixion and then resurrection - a new life after coming out from his tomb.

Predominantly gay churches, which have flourished in the Bay Area for decades, embrace a unique theology that shows parishioners how the Bible reflects many of the struggles they face every day. On no day is that more true than today, Easter, the faith’s most sacred day of the year.

Easter “evokes from us the experience of resurrection in our own bodies and in our own spirits,” said Mitulski, the pastor at New Spirit Community Church in Berkeley. “It’s not just a retelling. It’s an embodiment.”

…In Second Corinthians, the apostle Paul says he prayed three times for a thorn to be removed from his flesh. God doesn’t remove “the thorn” but says his grace is sufficient, which some interpret as God telling Paul to accept his body for what it is.

The Rev. Odette Lockwood-Stewart, 57, said gay theology forced her, a straight married woman, to broaden the definition of family and commitment to loved ones.

**“Queer theology challenges categories **and causes us to go deeper into stories, images and questions of faith and, in a sense, liberates us as well,” she said.

**This Easter morning, New Spirit congregants will mark Jesus’ resurrection. Some see it as a coming-out story. Jesus comes out of the tomb. **

sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/04/03/BACV1CO2G1.DTL&tsp=1

I’m longing for the day a holy person comes along, someone who truly struggled with homosexual tendencies yet remained chaste, and is canonized by the Church. That will make people forget all this pseudo-theological stuff. :thumbsup: Let’s pray for one!

In all probability there already are such people! To be fair, I cannot name one, but perhaps someone can.

I can name one who in all probability is such a person, but he is so discreet that I would be speculating to say he has SSA; nevertheless, the signs are there. He happens to be a priest, and of course a priest should be discreet about his sexuality. What a forgotten virtue in all walks of life these days: silence! He is a man of virtue, purity, and rarely paralleled charity. A true imitator of Christ.

Regarding the excerpt:
It was not only the freewheeling ‘private interpetation’ (not to mention distortion) of Scripture that troubled me about this article, and the quotes from the misguided that were published. It was again the narrowing of identity into the funnel of sexuality. The verb “to be,” for those of us with a grounding in philosophy, has profound reach. Multiply that several times over when it comes to how this verb is used in Scripture. It is a statement about the misplaced glorification of sexuality in modern culture that has allowed identity to be confused with sexuality. Really sad.

Beyond that, theology, quoted so casually in the article, is – from the Greek – the study of God, not the study of you, not the study of your genitals and how they behave or want to behave, nor the study of your psyche.

What false gods modern society has created. As if there weren’t enough false gods.

God knows which persons He is calling to the vocation of Saint (with a capital s). We should just keep praying and praying for one another, as we’ll probably never know the heart of these future Saints He is now forming. They may be sitting next to us in the pew!

Gertie

That is the problem of with so many people. They do not understand that God calls us to imitate Him It is not our place nor our right make us an idol in our image and call him the Christian God and expect to get to heaven. It doesn’t work that way.

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