Genuflecting


#1

This year, I was confirmed in the Roman Catholic Church via RCIA. I am 16 and still go to the Lutheran Church in town. When I enter my pew, I don’t want to look like an idiot who is randomly getting on one knee as I am entering my pew so when I genuflect, I only do it partially in that I don’t “hit the floor”.

Although Lutherans don’t believe in Transubstantiation, I still believe in it. That having been said, would it be proper for me to be even genuflecting in this manner or is it just me making a mockery of the Host?


#2

Is it the norm to genuflect in a Lutheran church? Being a cradle Catholic I don’t genuflect in Protestant churches. When I walk into a Catholic church and see the red candle burning beside the altar I know undoubtedly that the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Christ is contained within in the tabernacle.

In case you weren’t aware, we can’t take communion in Protestant churches.


#3

Is it the norm to genuflect in a Lutheran church? Being a cradle Catholic I don’t genuflect in Protestant churches. When I walk into a Catholic church and see the red candle burning beside the altar I know undoubtedly that the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Christ is contained within in the tabernacle. I don’t feel the same in non-Catholic churches.

Oh and in case you weren’t aware, we can’t take communion in Protestant churches.


#4

Not only do they not belive in Transubstatiation, but also the Lutheran Church has no valid Eucharist. So when you genuflect in such a church, you genuflect to common bread! The Catholic Church doesn’t allow you to genuflect there.


#5

Catholics are okay to attend baptisms, weddings and funerals at mainstream non-Catholic Christian churches.
However, it is advisable not to attend worship services at such churches and if you do you must not participate in anything during such service that would could be perceived as affirming things which contradict the teachings of the Catholic Church.
For example, you must not receive Communion.

May I ask the purpose of genuflecting in a Lutheran church?


#6

Since you were confirmed in the Roman Catholic Church via RCIA is there any reason why you cannot attend Mass there regularly?

God bless you on your spiritual journey!


#7

It really depends on what you intend by genuflecting.

Typically, Catholics genuflect before entering their pew as a way of acknowledging and adoring Jesus Christ, substantially presence in the Eucharist reserved in the tabernacle as indicated by the sanctuary light or otherwise exposed in their line of sight in the church.

Since this is the typical Catholic practice and since, according to the Catholic Church Jesus Christ is not substantially present in the Lutheran Eucharist due to their lack of valid holy orders, by genuflecting in a Lutheran church, your action could easily be misunderstood by others as idolatrous worship of mere bread and wine.


#8

As others have pointed out, genuflecting is a way of honoring Christ’s Real Presence in the Eucharist. Lutheran services do not have a valid Eucharist (you need a priest who has received ordination from a bishop who received ordination from another bishop which goes all the way back to the Apostles and then to Jesus to be able to have the miracle of transubstantiation). Because the bread remains bread, you wouldn’t have any need to bend the knee to it. If you attend a Lutheran service, just walk into the pew, sit and get whatever good you can out of it. Be careful, of course, to make sure you don’t digest any false teaching or imbibe a false ecumenism which thinks of Protestant groups as equally members of the Church. Jesus established one Church to be His bride - He isn’t a polygamist.

God bless! :thumbsup:


#9

I’ll have to work that into a homily some day. :thumbsup:


#10

I am aware of that fact. I had to get permission from the bishop to receive take communion there although once a month, I go to Mass and Confession as it is not feasibly possible for my mom, dad, and sister to keep switching between the local Lutheran church and Roman Catholic church. On the other hand, Luther did stress the importance of the genuflect in I think a sermon.


#11

You are good to be doing what you’re doing; keep it up but don’t lose sight of which is the true faith of Christ. If it were me I still wouldn’t take communion. At any rate hopefully your family will soon join you in conversion!


#12

As a Catholic you will never get permission from a Bishop to receive Communion in a Protestant Church. That would not only be a sin of grave matter on your part but also on the part of the bishop.


#13

Similar to as previously stated, the key here is to focus on the meaning behind genuflection.

Genuflection is a sign of reverence to the Blessed Sacrament. When the sanctuary lamp is illuminated, the Blessed Sacrament is reserved within the Tabernacle; therefore, genuflecting is proper.

The Blessed Sacrament is not present within a Lutheran church; therefore, genuflection is not proper.


#14

Genuflect comes from the Latin “flectere” (to bend) and “genu” (the knee) so technically you are genuflecting.


#15

I’ve heard of this before but never had it verified it’s possible; how did you receive permission to receive communion at the Lutheran church?


#16

No one can give permission to “receive communion at the Lutheran church.” It is not possible because there’s no Communion to be received.


#17

Hence the small “c” I used, Father. :wink:

I just don’t know what to call it without being insulting to our separated brethren.


#18

I hear you.

Many of them are quite comfortable saying the words “take the bread.” Since that’s what they often say themselves, I say it that way too.

Another way is to look to the Vatican II documents. Without quoting directly, the Fathers used words to this effect “commemorate/remember the Lord’s Supper.”

My point though, was not so much about the vocabulary, but that there’s no way for anyone to give or receive a dispensation for a Catholic to participate. Under certain circumstances, Catholic can receive Communion in a non-Catholic context, but only if it has been consecrated by a validly ordained priest; i.e. only if it truly is “Communion.”


#19

I see, thank you.

Is it true that there is a way to confirm a valid line of succession (a “pedigree” if you will) in Anglican and Episcopalian vicarages?


#20

No. It is NOT true. It’s one of those “urban legends” that, unfortunately, has taken on a life of its own on the internet. The Church has never given that nonsense the time of day. There’s no credibility to the whole thing.

The best proof of this is the fact that former Anglicans who become Catholic (Pastoral Provision or Ordinariates) must be ordained.


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