Genuflection at tomorrow's Mass of the Annunciation

Tomorrow is the Holy Day of Obligation the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary. I recall that instead of bowing during the Creed, on the Annunciation and on Christmas, we genuflect.

Is this correct? If so, which of these is correct?

“For us men and for our salvation, He came down from Heaven.
KNEEL
By the power of the Holy Spirit, He was born of the Virgin Mary, and became man.
STAND”

or

“For us men and for our salvation, He came down from Heaven.
By the power of the Holy Spirit, He was born of the Virgin Mary, and became man.
GENUFLECT”

Without speaking offically, I believe it is the second one,
For us men and for our salvation, He came down from Heaven.
By the power of the Holy Spirit, He was born of the Virgin Mary, and became man.
GENUFLECT and then stand,

The Annunciation is not a Holy Day of Obligation in the U.S.
usccb.org/liturgy/q&a/general/obligation.shtml

James

Partly correct:

Tomorrow is not a Holy Day of Obligation. Yes, we do genuflect at the words of Incarnation during the Creed.

P.S. nothing identifies where you are located, so I will assume that you are in the U.S.

On every other occasion, you bow as the words are said, rather than pause the Creed to bow. The same thing holds for the genuflection.

The first, for both feasts. But genuflect on the right knee, rather than kneel.

The rubric in the 2002 Latin edition of the Roman Missal, page 739, for the Solemnity of the Annunciation is:
"Dicitur Credo. Ad verba Et incarnatus est genuflectitur. "

If the Creed were being said in Latin, the words would be:
“Et incarnatus est de Spiritu Sancto
ex Maria Virgine, et homo factus est.”

The normal rubric, that comes before “Et incarnatus” is:
“Ad verba quae sequuntur, usque ad factus est, omnes se inclinant.”

So on a normal day everyone bows from “Et incarnatus” to “factus est”. But for the Annunciation, instead, everyone genuflects, puts the right knee to the ground.

In the Roman Missal, (Catholic Book Publishing Co., New York, 1985,) page 622 the rubric for the Annunciation is:
“In the profession of faith, all genuflect at the words, and became man.”

Taken literally one would bow, then genuflect for just three words. But I think the Latin edition makes it clear that the bow is replaced by a genuflection.

From the 2002 General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM) approved for the USA, which can be accessed from romanrite.com/girm.html :
“275. … b. A bow of the body, that is to say a profound bow, is made … in the Creed at the words* Et incarnatus est (by the power of the Holy Spirit . . . made man)*;”

Reference: Missale Romanum, Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 2002, ISBN: 8820972719 .

My PV fell asleep at the wheel today. He came out in purple vestments. :confused: My pastor, who was also at Mass, reminded him that it was the Solemnity of the Annunciation (my PV started reading the Entrance Antiphon for the Lenten Wednesday).

He did preach an incredibly awesome homily! :thumbsup::smiley:

However, during the Creed, he made a profound bow. I think I was the only one who genuflected. My pastor kind of looked at me. I guess everyone forgot. :shrug: After Mass, my PV and I talked about it. He realized that we were supposed to have genuflected.

Yesterday was the Annunciation of the Lord. As others noted it’s not a holy day of obligation in the USA.

The Ascension of the Lord is and at least in my diocese it’s celebrated on Sunday, May 24.

NB: My current Ordo (the official one for use in my ecclesiastical province) – The Order of Prayer in the Liturgy of the Hours and Celebration of the Eucharist 2009 compiled by Fr. Peter D. Rocca, CSC and printed by the Paulist Press correctly specifies the vestment color violet (Vi) for the Annunciation of the Lord.

Today is the Solemnity of the Annunciation of the Lord. I do not know if you are here in the United States, but we are on March 25th.

We had about 200 at the 9 am mass; about twice the usual number for a weekday. About a third genuflected when the pastor did. However, he remained kneeling for 30-40 seconds, maybe longer. By the time he rose about 90% had gotten the message and were on their knees. :thumbsup:

Oh, I just realized I called it the “Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary” instead of the “Annunciation of the Lord.” Just a slip of the tongue (hand?). I must have been thinking the Annunciation TO Mary or something.

I am, in fact, in the United States. Why is this not considered a Holy Day of Obligation?

During the Homily, the Priest stated that on “The Old Calendar” it would be The Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, but on the New Calendar it is the Annunciation of the Lord.

Also during the Credo (Mind you this was a Dominican Rite Mass) it was proper to kneel during “Et incarnatus est de Spiritu Sancto ex Maria Virgine, et homo factus est”

Oh, yes, that’s it. As one who attends the EF when I can, I use the 1962 calendar. That does call it the “Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary.”

My current Ordo (the official one for use in my ecclesiastical province (located in the USA)] – The Order of Prayer in the Liturgy of the Hours and Celebration of the Eucharist 2009 compiled by Fr. Peter D. Rocca, CSC and printed by the Paulist Press correctly specifies the vestment color violet (Vi) for the Annunciation of the Lord which was celebrated this year on March 29.

Your “PV” had it right. :rolleyes:

But, the solemnity of the Annunciation is March 25th, not March 29th.

Because it is not listed as a Holy Day of Obligation under the universal law of the Church:

Can. 1246 §1. Sunday, on which by apostolic tradition the paschal mystery is celebrated, must be observed in the universal Church as the primordial holy day of obligation. The following days must also be observed: the Nativity of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Epiphany, the Ascension, the Body and Blood of Christ, Holy Mary the Mother of God, her Immaculate Conception, her Assumption, Saint Joseph, Saint Peter and Saint Paul the Apostles, and All Saints.

§2. With the prior approval of the Apostolic See, however, the conference of bishops can suppress some of the holy days of obligation or transfer them to a Sunday.

**As to the color of sacred vestments, the traditional usage is to be retained: namely,
**
White is used in the Offices and Masses during the Easter and Christmas seasons; also on celebrations of the Lord other than of his Passion, of the Blessed Virgin Mary, of the Holy Angels, and of Saints who were not Martyrs; on the Solemnities of All Saints (1 November) and of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (24 June); and on the Feasts of Saint John the Evangelist (27 December), of the Chair of Saint Peter (22 February), and of the Conversion of Saint Paul (25 January).
General Instruction of the Roman Missal 346

White it is.

James

Well, yes, I know that. From my understanding, the Annunciation is a “Solemnity.” I would just have thought that a “Solemnity” would equate to a Holy Day of Obligation.

It was announced yesterday morning, prior to the entrance, that we would be genuflecting three times during the Creed and to follow the pastor. He only genuflected once though. And he wore white.

Just thought I’d throw that in there. :slight_smile:

A Solmnity is not necessarily a Holy Day of Obligation.

In general, a feast ranking as a Solemnity means that it is of such importance that it will even outrank a Sunday should it fall on that day. The exception is that a Solemnity will not outrank the Sundays in Advent, Lent, Easter, and a few other days of the year.

In general the Solemnities are:

Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God
Epiphany
St. Joseph
Annunciation
Easter
Ascension
Pentecost
Trinity Sunday
Body and Blood of Christ
Sacred Heart of Jesus
Nativity of St. John the Baptist
Sts. Peter and Paul
Assumption
All Saints
Christ the King
Immaculate Conception
Christmas

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