Germany allows 'indeterminate' gender at birth


#1

bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-24767225

Germany has become Europe’s first country to allow babies with characteristics of both sexes to be registered as neither male nor female.

Parents are now allowed to leave the gender blank on birth certificates, in effect creating a new category of “indeterminate sex”.

The move is aimed at removing pressure on parents to make quick decisions on sex assignment surgery for newborns.


#2

Sometimes gender is indeterminate at birth. This allows parents to make a more informed decision at an appropriate time.


#3

Haha, yeah, this type of thing was a hot topic in Sweden a year or two ago.

We actually now have the term “hen”. which is used in place of han/hon (he/she)…
Its basically a legit sex named “He-She”… imagine that…

:doh2:


#4

http://g33kp0rn.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/i-dont-want-to-live-on-this-planet-anymore.jpg


#5

I would agree with this if it's done as a temporary measure until it is clearer which gender's sexual characteristics the child has more of. One only has to read the tragic story of David Reimer to realise that making hasty decisions for intersex children can have terrible outcomes.


#6

What? Why?


#7

Definitely agree. This is not a transgender issue it’s a biological issue that parents need time and testing and care in figuring out.


#8

Yep and the article clearly stated “Germany has become Europe’s first country to allow babies with** characteristics of both sexes **to be registered as neither male nor female.”


#9

I am not sure whether this is a bad thing or not. Isn’t there a condition where the gender at birth truly is indeterminate?


#10

Yes, some people are born inter-sexed but it used to be called hermaphrotism. It’s a very good thing to wait especially for surgery.

nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001669.htm


#11

I remember reading something about genetic testing which can tell male from female. Why not just use that test?


#12

If nothing else, there’s some evidence that genetics may not be the proper determiner (e.g. androgen insensitivity syndrome, which may cause intersexual characteristics but often seems to result in an XY woman).


#13

[quote="DarkLight, post:12, topic:343904"]
If nothing else, there's some evidence that genetics may not be the proper determiner (e.g. androgen insensitivity syndrome, which may cause intersexual characteristics but often seems to result in an XY woman).

[/quote]

Whatever they use to tell if remains are male or female when unidentifiable.


#14

[quote="Nacho45, post:13, topic:343904"]
Whatever they use to tell if remains are male or female when unidentifiable.

[/quote]

Sometimes that's DNA, sometimes it's secondary characteristics like pelvis size (which may not be evident in children). These tests can be fooled by people with various abnormal traits. Either way that may not account well for children in general, and especially intersex children who may have mixed traits.

My point is, we aren't entirely sure what physical markers "make" someone a man or a woman. So there's a decent argument to be made about not rushing.


#15

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