Get behind me Satan! Was St. Peter possesed?

Why did our Lord Jesus called Peter Satan? Was He directly talking to Peter or to Satan when He said this? (Mat 16: 21-23).

He was talking to St. Peter. Jesus used the word “satan,” a severe insult, as an admonition.

It seems uncharateristic of our Lord to insult just to get His message across. He could have just said, Peter that is what Satan want you to do, or something in to that effect.

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The word means “adversary”. Jesus is identifying that Peter interfering with His mission is an adversarial approach. No, Peter was not posessed.

John 17:12-13
12 While I was with them, I protected them in your name that you have given me. I guarded them, and not one of them was lost except the one destined to be lost, so that the scripture might be fulfilled.

It is obviously to me that the Lord was speaking to satan. St Peter was a disciple of Jesus satan was not.

the statement St Peter made probably came from satan and there is why Jesus said what He said.

as we know St Peter was not satan.

hope this help.

In a way I understand that our Lord Jesus was rebuking St. Peter. But I don’t understand why did He not just say, Peter, that is what Satan wants you to do and that is not the will of the Father.

are we trying to tell our Lord how He should speak?

there is a passage in the Bible that talks about that. somebody else might know where. Jesus tell St Peter about satan trying to get the apostles and Jesus says but “I prayed for you that when you…you strenght your brothers.”

believe as satan tried with the apostles he also continue his attempt to steal Jesus Church. but we rely on the promise of Jesus that the Church is protected by Jesus Himself.

hope this help.

:bowdown: :highprayer: :byzsoc:

Uncharacteristic? Hardly! This is the same Jesus that called the Pharisees and Scribes a “brood of vipers!” He slammed the people who tried to sway him, and used very harsh language to get his point across.

Read Matthew 23 for a more thorough list of names he calls the Pharisees.

The passage to which you are referring is Luke 22:31-32:
“And the Lord said, Simon, Simon, behold, Satan hath desired to have you, that he may sift you as wheat: but I have prayed for thee, that thy faith fail not: and when thou art converted, strengthen thy brethren.”

Yes, but He said this to people who deserved tbe called such things. St. Peter was just saying (if that was St. Peter talking) how he felt at that time. If one of your kids say this to you and you know that in their heart they just want to protect you, will you call them Satan?

So I meant “hardly” in a sense that He knew that St. Peter is on His side and that he just wanted to protect the Lord.

In St. Marks Gospel, when our Lord was arrested and and one of the disciples cut the ear of one of the bad guys, our Lord did not address the disciples as Satan, and if you think about it this disciple actually carried out the sentiments of St. Peter.

Who deserves to be insulted by Almighty God? Weren’t some of the Pharisees honestly misled, well-intentioned men who tried to uphold the customs of their religion?

. St. Peter was just saying (if that was St. Peter talking) how he felt at that time. If one of your kids say this to you and you know that in their heart they just want to protect you, will you call them Satan?

So I meant “hardly” in a sense that He knew that St. Peter is on His side and that he just wanted to protect the Lord.

In St. Marks Gospel, when our Lord was arrested and and one of the disciples cut the ear of one of the bad guys, our Lord did not address the disciples as Satan, and if you think about it this disciple actually carried out the sentiments of St. Peter.

If I was teaching people a way of living, a way of life, a way to heaven, and they just didn’t understand no matter how much I drove the point home, I don’t know what kind of words would come out of my mouth. My grandma calls me an idiot whn I do or say something stupid…:shrug: :stuck_out_tongue:

The fact of the matter is, Jesus had a temper–in fact, He has the wrath of God! Luckily, He immediately forgave Peter. He forgave Peter many many times. Jesus was volatile at times, and even ransacked the marketplace in the temple–I’m sure some of those people had good intentions too, and He certainly would have known that.

Plus, Peter was supposed to be the head of the Apostles after the ascension of Christ. Jesus had to really drive these points home to the simple fisherman, and get Peter’s head on straight. If Jesus looked me in the eye and called me satan (images of the devil aside, ‘satan’ means adversary, or enemy), you can be damn sure I’d shut up and not argue with Him anymore. I imagine Peter’s reaction was quite the same (at least for a while).

This image of Jesus as some soft-spoken, quiet, hugs&kisses guy is nice, but it isn’t the Biblical Christ. Jesus was a tough man, a warrior. Uncharacteristic? I don’t think so.

Ok lets not be like a protestant and only read part of any scripture and assume a meaning.

What else was said?

16 From that time on, Jesus began to show his disciples that he
17 must go to Jerusalem and suffer greatly from the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes, and be killed and on the third day be raised.
22
18 Then Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him, "God forbid, Lord! No such thing shall ever happen to you."
23
He turned and said to Peter, "Get behind me, Satan! You are an obstacle to me. You are thinking not as God does, but as human beings do

Lets read footnote 18

18 [22-23] Peter’s refusal to accept Jesus’ predicted suffering and death is seen as a satanic attempt to deflect Jesus from his God-appointed course, and the disciple is addressed in terms that recall Jesus’ dismissal of the devil in the temptation account (Matthew 4:10: “Get away, Satan!”). Peter’s satanic purpose is emphasized by Matthew’s addition to the Marcan source of the words You are an obstacle to me.

*** My Refelection ***

You know, I honestly truely believe that there was a reason that Jesus was a tad harder on our first pope. I think possibly Jesus held him to a higher standard than the rest. Possibly because he was to be the leader of his church on earth.

He had to really, really make St. Peter think and deeply believe in him and not question him. I don’t think he was calling St. Peter himself Satan, however he was merely pointing out “You are thinking what Satan wants you to think and when you do that, you are acting on his behalf”

He told Peter, that he would deny him 3 times before the cock crows. Sure enough that happened. I think this could have been part of God’s plan to mold his leadership skills.

Because Jesus had come to do His Father’s Will.

The temptations in chapter 4 were all ways of getting Him to do it on the devil’s terms - which would have been no different from refusing to do it. Peter tempts Him - with the best of intentions no doubt, to do it by avoiding the very thing that was essential to is being done. The Cross could not be avoided - for only by being crucified could Jesus be king in fact, & not in words only. Only by dying that death could he be raised from death. Only by dying on the Cross could He break the power of satan, death, & the netherworld. Only through the humiliation of the Cross was it possible to come to the Resurrection, the Ascension, & the Sitting at His Father’s hand. Unless He died, we would be eternally cut off from His Father.

So the Cross is absolutely, well, crucial to the meaning of all four gospels, to the purpose of God, to the Kingship of God, to the life of the Church, to the being of the Sacraments. Without it, there is no faith in Christ. If everything else but it were removed, it would alone be almost enough to restore everything else from. Take it away, & all else collapses in ruins. So Peter was speaking the will of Satan. This BTW is one of the texts in which Jesus magnifies & exalts His Father’s Will above the ties of family & friendship - both can become obstacles to obeying God.

In your opinion, was his statement (verse 22) influenced by Satan, or was it just an innocent statement that just happened to be what Satan wanted?

I don’t know, I was not there and honestly can’t quote things AS fact.

Lets look at this…

“You are thinking not AS God does, but AS human beings do.”

I think that we AS humans are very easily tempted by the devil and do and say things without even realizing that the devil tempted us. Impulse thinking. I think the lesson here is think before you act or say. What was that old saying that is popular, WWJD?

St. Peter rebuked the Lord. That is a no, no. Not believing and follow his word, without question. Why would we ever do that, AS humans I think we are programmed to question authority, we should never question Gods authority. The act of questioning authority, where does that come from, Satan?

So Satan knew that death on the cross is how he is going to be defeated?

Satan knew that if Jesus did what Jesus said He would do, Jesus would win. I’m not convinced he knew that the crucifixion would destroy him, because why would he have seduced Judas to betray the Lord? But if he could get an Apostle to tempt the Lord to sway from His path, the devil knew that the devil would win.

thank you.

blessings to you.

Jesus did tell Peter he was thinking like a man and not thinking of God’s will. Of course St. Peter was not possessed, but the devil does influence our thoughts, which is what happened to Peter. Jesus was simply letting Peter know that it was satan’s influence that caused him to think like a man.

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