Getting Rid of Palm Sunday Palms

I have nothing to do with them now. They are just sitting on top of a box where I keep my keys. What am I to do with them now? Do I throw them in the garbage, or am I to burn them?

I keep mine behind a picture frame of my loved ones.
They have been blessed. Next year, you may take them back to the church and they will burn them to make the Ashes for Ashe Wednesday.
Don’t throw them out.

I have one set in a vase beside my statue of Our Lady of Fatima. I have another set tied into a cross behind my wedding picture.

On Ash Wednesday, I take my palms out and burn them until they are ashes because I always forget to take them to church for the Easter Vigil fire. I then scatter the ashes in my garden so they return to the earth.

Never throw away anything that has been blessed; it either needs to be burned or buried.

You may burn them, but you can also cut them up and bury them. They should not go in the garbage (nor should any blessed item). You can also call your parish office and see if they will take them for Ash Wednesday next year or to dispose of them properly.

It’s past now, but one fun Catholic tradition is a bonfire for St John’s Day, and you can burn any broken sacramentals then. I have done that with broken medals, rosaries, palms, etc.

ETA: Some people do keep them for a long time, and that’s perfectly OK as well. Actually, when you first get them, you can keep them in a vase like fresh flowers and they will not dry out. Behind pictures or crucifixes is also common. Some people can make beautiful art with them!

This year I engaged in a serious cleanout of our house and unfortunately I found many that had fallen behind cabinets, etc, which is not very appropriate for sacramentals. :blush: There were…a lot. :eek: So I ended up disposing of them all by cutting up and burying (the cutting up isn’t necessary, but it did make burial easier. I put them in a flower bed.)

Some people do keep them for a long time, and that’s perfectly OK as well. Actually, when you first get them, you can keep them in a vase like fresh flowers and they will not dry out. Behind pictures or crucifixes is also common. Some people can make beautiful art with them!

This year I engaged in a serious cleanout of our house and unfortunately I found many that had fallen behind cabinets, etc, which is not very appropriate for sacramentals. :blush: There were…a lot. :eek: So I ended up disposing of them all by cutting up and burying (the cutting up isn’t necessary, but it did make burial easier. I put them in a flower bed.)

Here is a page that shows the many ways that FRESH palms can be braided

google.com/search?hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=963&q=woven+palms&oq=woven+palms&gs_l=img.12…2093.9115.0.20301.25.12.5.8.3.0.200.1062.9j1j1.11.0…0…1ac.1.64.img…1.16.1035…0j0i5i10i30j0i5i30j0i10i24j0i30j0i24.KcGnDOzrltc

My father-in-law used to bury them at the four corners of his property. I always thought that was kind of cool :cool:

Thanks for the replies! The palms I got are probably around 1 to 2 feet long, a bit too big to put behind a frame. They’re too dry now to make anything with them, so I guess I’ll take a lighter to them or give them back to the church.

If I burn them, what do I do with the ashes?

You bury the ashes. :slight_smile:

Some families keep the ashes for their own Ash Wednesday (which is permitted, putting on ashes doesn’t have to be in the context of Mass) but the easiest thing to do would be to bury them.

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