Girl Scouts and Planned Parenthood


#1

The Girl Scouts and Planned Parenthood have, in recent history, had an unfortunate and mutually supportive relationship - at least at the executive levels.

Because of this we are uneasy about buying those yummy Girl Scout cookies.

What do we tell the sweet girl scouts when they come to sell their cookies?

Obviously, this is not the time for deep apologetics.

Thanks,
Scapular


#2

Girl Scouts and Planned Parenthood also share many ideas and goals, and frequently find themselves supporting radical feminist positions internationally, particularly at the United Nations. In any case, they are always opposite the Catholic Church on the issue of abortion, “women’s rights” for girls even at the tender age of 9, etc. Google up International Planned Parenthood Federation, Girl Scouts ( or Girl Guides) and the United Nations, and you will have plenty to read about their not so innocuous agenda.

As to the cookies, I simply say to the little salesgirls: No, thank you!


#3

My family is very serious about our committment to God, and my daughter is a Brownie - is there anyone else out there who has had a positive experience w/ Girl Scouts for their daughter? Being in Girl Scouts was a high point of my childhood. Kate


#4

[quote=x4us]My family is very serious about our committment to God, and my daughter is a Brownie - is there anyone else out there who has had a positive experience w/ Girl Scouts for their daughter? Being in Girl Scouts was a high point of my childhood. Kate
[/quote]

The “experience” is irrelevant.

To particpate in their agenda is immoral. Do you want your daughter earning “family planning” badges by making a field trip to planned parenthood???

I understand local troops can have some control over what their daughters do, but the radical feminist agenda pervades the Girl Scouts and their materials-- and certainly the local troops are made to support the national organization through their cookie peddling.

And, to answer your questions, I quit after Brownies. I didn’t like Girl Scouts.


#5

Can anyone post links to articles that show the working or idealogical relationship between Girl Scouts and Planned Parenthood? Thank you.


#6

all.org/stopp/scouts/

all.org/stopp/st040409.htm

cwfa.org/articles/5431/CWA/misc/

cwfa.org/articledisplay.asp?id=8808&department=CFI&categoryid=papers

jimmyakin.org/2005/05/girl_scouts_pla.html


#7

I have a daughter in Scouts. Her leaders are 2 parents of girls in her Catholic school class. I know and trust them very well. I have to sign any field trip permission slips so I know what their activities are. As long as my daughter is not involved in activities that these 2 leaders are in charge of, I am very comfortable with having her in Scouts. She is not involved in any regional or national level activities.

As far as cookies go, that is how her troop is funded. I am sure some of this money goes to the national organization.

As with many of these organizations, the liberalism starts at the top and works it’s way down. (Much faster in certain parts of the country I would think.) It is so unfortunate that the Girl Scouts do not follow the moral compass of the Boy Scouts. I really admire their leadership. They stand up to so much persecution.


#8

As an alternative, look up information on the American Heritage Girls club. A mother started this club after being disgusted with her local liberal Girl Scouts.

Another Catholic alternative, is Little Flowers program, for girls up to about age 12, I think. From Catholic Heritage Curricula. www.chcweb.com


#9

My daughter is in a homeschool Brownie troop. The majority of families I believe are Christians, including several Catholics. I have no worries about planned parenthood within our group because they wouldn’t allow it.


#10

I agree w/ you completely. We live in a very conservative part of America - where the liberalism hasn’t worked it’s way down as much - and the field trips to Planned Parenthood simply would not happen here.

I need to respectfully disagree w/ the person who said that the “experience” isn’t important. My daughter has problems w/ social skills, and she needs experience in group settings to learn how to do well w/ other people. My limited experience w/ the Heritage clubs has shown that they have a very Fundamentalist Protestant foundation, and that worries me.

So, for now, my daughter will continue to make crafts, sing songs, and play games w/ girls her own age - meeting in a Church, led by other mothers I respect. Kate


#11

I was looking at AHG as an alternative for Brownies,and didn’t like it. Too fundamentalist, although there are a few Catholic parishes elsewhere that sponsor it.

There would never be a trip to Planned Parenthood here, either. Father would come storming down on that one in a hurry!

I, too, wish Girl Scouts were more like Boy Scouts. I can tell you that they changed since my adult daughter was a girl. They were much, much, MUCH more liberal in the early to mid 80s. They lost members. They backed down- a bit. Not far enough, but the Girl Scout law and promise no longer sound like a pledge to join a commune.

One granddaughter is a Brownie, and one a Daisy. I am hoping to find another group for them. So far, AHG is a no, and Camp Fire is a no in the opposite direction. So, next we look into Catholic Daughters of America program.


#12

My daughter was a first year Daisy last year and I was a co-leader of her troop. The leader was a Pentacostal and a good friend of mine. I had questions regarding the link between PP and GS and the only “direct” link for the United States program is the roundabout link to United Way. I even looked on the UW’s financial records to see if they supported PP and they admitted that they won’t take a stand on it. I can’t remember if UW supports PP in other areas but they don’t outwardly support abortion. They did make a disclaimer that they don’t control the local levels of UW. With that said… I spent 9 years in Girl Scouts when I was growing up and learned alot. My mother was my leader in most of my troops and then I quit when I was in high school only because the girls in the troop wanted to gossip and talk about who they were sleeping with that weekend. I felt out of place and disgusted.

I don’t think it’s fair to say the experience isn’t important… you touch a flame and it burns… that’s an experience. :stuck_out_tongue: Life is an experience from our choices. I honestly feel that if we find a good group of young girls and their mothers, you’ll have a good troop that will lean towards your goals and ideals.

As for the cookies… I don’t know. I know what alot of you want me to say… but that’s an indulgence of mine. :slight_smile:


#13

The cookie part is easy!!!

Nobody should ever feel forced to buy anything. The whole cookie process teaches the girls how to sell. Selling includes rejection.

So, if you don’t want cookies, say, “No, thanks” when the girls show up at the door, or in the parking lot of your local supermarket. An 8 or 10 year old does not need to hear the why of your non-purchase. You should save that for a one-page letter to your local council.

Now, if you do, that’s another matter entirely. My choice: Traditional thin mints, and Samoas.


#14

[quote=MomToMany]As far as cookies go, that is how her troop is funded. I am sure some of this money goes to the national organization.

[/quote]

Most of the money goes to the council and the national organization. The troop only gets to keep like a nickel per box.


#15

Actually, the amount the troops get to keep varies from council to council. We got 50 cents per box. A troop is required to participate in the cookie sale and the family plesge drive in order to be approved for holding any other fund-raising activity. I was a leader for my daughter’s troops from Daisy to Cadette. (1987 - 1996). I was not aware of any defined relationship between PP and GSUSA, but there was some “sex education” offered - participation required parental permission. I never got involved in it, but I can surmise it probably came from PP. I don’t recall anything from PP in any of my GS leader training. I encountered a lot of “political correctness” - in such things as the wording of the Promise - they did not remove the word God, but leaders were asked to tell the girls they could substitute whatever expression they used for their diety such as “the Creator” or “Allah” - so that non-Christian girls would not feel left out or compelled to express themselves in a way not in accordance with their family’s beliefs. I found political correctness in many of the badge requirements - the toys badge (Juniors) aksed the girls to go to the toy store and list all the toys that led to violence, and to write to the store manager to express concern (ie, boy toys are bad, girl toys are good). In Cadettes, everything became focused on careers. Since we had some SAHMs, we took care to include this as a valid and responsible choice for adult women. Also, in Cadettes and Seniors, there are more council sponsored activities and trips (Wider Ops), with leaders that may find PP (and political correctness) quite acceptable.


#16

“To particpate in their agenda is immoral. Do you want your daughter earning “family planning” badges by making a field trip to planned parenthood???”

Excuse me, I believe this comment was innapropriate. I find it highly offensive. I am a Senior Girl Scout. I have been a scout for the past 11 years. I have never seen anything promoting “family planning”. I’ve seen every badge, try-it, and interest project available . The badges teach life skills. Some badges do include things like learning how much it costs to run a household, how do you take care of a child, and things like that. I’ve never heard of ANY troop in my area taking a field trip to planned parenthood. If something like that comes up, it comes from the LEADER and from the leader ONLY. It’s a sad day when we tell parents and children it is a sin to be a Girl Scout.


#17

[quote=DiZent]Actually, the amount the troops get to keep varies from council to council. We got 50 cents per box. A troop is required to participate in the cookie sale and the family plesge drive in order to be approved for holding any other fund-raising activity…
[/quote]

And in our council, we get half the retail price. Daisies, to the best of my knoweldge, sell nothing per national guidelines. They also aren’t allowed to stay overnight or go over 25 miles from home for the day, with a 4:1 ratio of Daisies to adults on an outing.

[quote=Arwen037]Excuse me, I believe this comment was innapropriate. I find it highly offensive…It’s a sad day when we tell parents and children it is a sin to be a Girl Scout.
[/quote]

It is a sad day indeed. I will concur with your opinion that a lot of Girl Scouting, despite some pressures from National, is controlled at the local troop or group level. That being said, in some areas councils and service units are a little more forceful in their pursuit than others regarding the issue of contraception, abortion and homosexual issues. Could it depend on the locale, such as midwestern culture over western or eastern culture? Possibly.

As I stated earlier, the national organization has made a swing from the 80s adaptation of the promise and laws. I don’t have a copy in front of me, but it was VERY politically correct and actively engaged in gender-neutral language and extremisms for the evironment from the promise and laws I upheld as a scout. It sounded like a pledge to a 60s or 70s commune, and talked a great deal about ecology.

Before that, this is what scouts upheld, going all the way back to 1912:

"On my honor, I will try, to do my duty to God and my country; to help othe rpeople at all times, and to obey the Girl Scout law.

“A Girl Scout’s honor is to be trusted. A Girl Scout is loyal. A Girl Scout’s duty is to be useful and to help others. A Girl Scout is a friend to all and sister to every other Girl Scout. A Girl Scout is courteous. A Girl Scout is a friend to animals. A Girl Scout obeys orders. A Girl Scout is cheerful. A Girl Scout is thrifty. A Girl Scout is clean in thought, word and deed.”

Pretty similar to Boy Scouts, right?
scouting.org/nav/enter.jsp?s=by
(Look toward the bottom of the page)

For whatever reasons, when the new pledge came in, girls dropped out and never joined, and/ or parents had a rough way to go with Girl Scouts during that time frame. The organization dropped membership in a big way. So, they adapted the 70s/80s promise and laws with the “old” promise and alws and came up with this:

girlscouts.org/program/gs_central/promise_law/

Gee, numbers went up a little. The pledge came back almost to the original. The law, well, I think it’s vague.

I really, truly believe that if somebody with a little common sense on the national level looked at Boy Scouts and how they have constant growth despite negative comments from the liberal media, and adapted a sort of “regression”, Girl Scouts would be better served.[/size]


#18

I used to be in Girl Scouts when I was 9 an 10 years old. Is this whole “Girl Scounts and Planned Parenthood” thing somewhat new? Because I don’t remember anything like that when I was a Girl Scout. :confused:


#19

The Girl Scout Council you belong to may not directly have programs associated with Planned Parenthood, but all councils do invite girls, through the Girl Scout handbooks and newsletters sent to girls, to go to the website for GSUSA. At the site for girls 11-17 yrs, called Studio 2B, they have an interest project called On Your Own that had a “helpful link” to Planned Parenthood through Dec. 4th, 2005. This link was just removed on Dec. 5th. I have no idea how long it was present. They still have links to the Global Fund for Women which supports reproductive rights and another to learn more about Eve Ensler, the playwrite for The Vagina Monologues. These are through “helpful links” for the Global Girls Interest Projects. The GS handbook also invites girls to go to the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) website. Here the girls have access to read the AIDS Badge curriculum. They can read this with no parental knowledge. A Girl Scout honor troop requirement is to support the Juliette Low World Friendship Fund. A donation is given from this fund annually to the WAGGGS through the World Thinking Day Fund. If you want your daughters to be Girl Scouts and not be exposed to anything against their faith, you would have to daily “watchdog” their exposure to Girl Scout materials. You may not have direct exposure at the local parish level, but the info can get to the girls in other ways. Just wearing the uniform and using the name “girl scout” represents GIrl Scouts as a whole and all they stand for.


#20

This connection seems highly overblown and unrepresentative of the experience of the vast majority of girls who participate in GS, including my two daughters who attended their troop meetings at our parish.

And as for the cookies…I’m up to a case and a 1/2 and counting…I find I simply can’t say “no” when it comes to Thin Mints.:whistle:


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.