Gluten Free...Agh!


#1

After some blood tests, my doctor has concluded that I have Celiac disease. The good news is that this may be why my Rheumatoid Arthritis is flaring up. The bad news is that I am a total bread and pasta junkie!

Does anyone else have this?

How have you managed with a gluten free lifestyle?

LynnieLew


#2

I have gluten intolerance, luckily there are many alternatvies to flour, though it is all very expensive. It is not easy fighting the temptation of eating the foods we are so used to eating. Me being a diabetic I miss the sweets. There are hundreds of recipes and gluten-free specialty stores online. Stock up on lots of rice flours, tapioca, potato and flaxseed flours/meals. I like Flaxseed meal/flour the most, especially for breading meats, since it has a nutty taste

Another reason why Flaxseed owns
"Flaxseed is often called a miracle food because its Omega-3 oils have been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, lower cholesterol levels and fight other ailments including cancer."

Google “gluten free recipes” and “gluten free flour alternatives” I don’t know if we are allowed to post links. Sorry I can’t be of anymore help.

Good luck and god bless


#3

Be sure to talk to your priest so that he can provide you a gluten free Eucharist.


#4

Check this out: Catholic Celiac Society


#5

I had a nice chat with another poster on the forums who is Celiac named JoyToBeCatholic. I PMed her and told her to post here too! We are going through all the diagnosis stuff right now with my 9 year old daughter who is having trouble with her tummy and just not gaining weight, Celiac is one of the possibilities.


#6

Oh, the difficulties of being initially diagnosed! Being that I am gluten/wheat intolerant and not Celiac it is not quite as difficult for me. I still must avoid food with wheat in it which includes one of my favorite snacks - pepper poppers!

May I suggest any cookbook or book by Carol Fenster, Ph.D. the book I have is Wheat-Free Recipes and Menus. She gives many resources for wheat free flours and some wonderful wheat free recipes. I have to even adjust some of these because wheat is not the only food I have an intolerance/allergy for but it is a great resource.

We purchase Carol Fenster’s book, “Gluten Free 101” for my daughter’s best friend who had several of the markers for celiac but not “full blown” and she uses it to cook and learned to adjust other recipes using this book.

Also, check out your local health food store for gluten free (G-F) breads and cereals - there are plenty finally on the market. I just found some frozen waffles that were G-F, makes for a nice change in breakfast.

Also, watch out for your condiments, there is wheat in soy sauce - except I think LaChoy but read the label, the same for Worscestershire Sauce, Mayo’s and Salad Dressings. Start reading labels and learn all the “names” for wheat from your dietition (you should be seeing one to help you with this new way of eating).

As for Communion, definitely talk to your Priest and let him know of your diagnosis and that you must receive from the cup only - not a problem if your Parish offers both, just get in the line for the Precious Blood!

Anyway, good luck in learning a new way of eating and don’t worry, you won’t have to give up bread and pasta (there are corn pastas out there) you just have to eat a different kind and if you don’t already make things form scratch (and I mean, no mixes either) learn how it is a wonderful skill to have!

Brenda V.


#7

[quote=Michael’s Sword]Be sure to talk to your priest so that he can provide you a gluten free Eucharist.
[/quote]

There is no such thing as a gluten free host. I believe there is a low gluten host. If they parish cannot provide it, just receive he cup.

PF


#8

And if you are ever concerned that the cup might not be available to the general congregation, I suggest you tell the Priest prior to Mass your problem and sit up near the front to make it easy for him to share some of his. :slight_smile:


#9

[quote=Orionthehunter]And if you are ever concerned that the cup might not be available to the general congregation, I suggest you tell the Priest prior to Mass your problem and sit up near the front to make it easy for him to share some of his. :slight_smile:
[/quote]

CAUTION! The priest’s chalice has a piece of the host in it. You probably need a separate chalice.


#10

There is a wonderful woman from Seattle called Bette Hagman, who has written 5 or 6 terrific cookbooks for celiacs with lots and lots of wonderful recipes for bread, cookies, cakes, pies, pasta, and of course, all the dinner types of foods. Another woman, Rebecca Reilly has written a cookbook called Gluten-Free Baking which has more great recipes.

I order much of my speciality foods from The Gluten-Free Pantry in Connecticut and from the Gluten-Free Trading Company in St. Paul. You can easily find them on the internet. One of them has gluten free soy sauce. Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce is gluten free also.

There are also wonderful rice pastas that are every bit as good as wheat. I think Tinkyada brand is the best for not falling apart.

Yes, the supplies are a bit more expensive, but I understand that if you have a medical diagnosis, you can deduct some of your food cost off your taxes. Unfortunately, I can’t do that, having discovered on my own about 12 years ago that I couldn’t tolerate all of this gluten. But, there is no way I would go back to eating it just for a positive diagnosis for tax purposes.

Eating out and traveling are sometimes annoying because of the lack of choices. But, I certainly don’t feel like my life is lacking, foodwise. I eat just about everything I used to eat, except for donuts. I have bread, waffles, bagels, English muffins, cookies, cakes, pies, muffins, pancakes, all gluten free, made from scratch at home. But, then, I’ve always made things from scratch.

The only things I really miss are Cheerios and scrapple.


#11

I beg to differ with the don’t eat the host people. Come now Catholics this is the body of Christ.

Gluten problems are associated with refined white baked yeast expanded flour ingestion. It addicts as the refined carbohydrate stops seritonin productions in the brain and replaces it with a endorphin high. Search the internet, see a good doctor who knows nutrition and advocates no sugar and white flour. The daniel diet vegetables and water is the perfect cure it may be extreme for you yet.

Pray for your addiction to bread confess it, I had it, and take the eucharist as often as you can for healing, it healed me of all my sexual sins far worse than food addictions.

Brother John


#12

[quote=jbuttrey]I beg to differ with the don’t eat the host people. Come now Catholics this is the body of Christ.

Gluten problems are associated with refined white baked yeast expanded flour ingestion. It addicts as the refined carbohydrate stops seritonin productions in the brain and replaces it with a endorphin high. Search the internet, see a good doctor who knows nutrition and advocates no sugar and white flour. The daniel diet vegetables and water is the perfect cure it may be extreme for you yet.

Pray for your addiction to bread confess it, I had it, and take the eucharist as often as you can for healing, it healed me of all my sexual sins far worse than food addictions.

Brother John
[/quote]

Brother John - many of us who are gluten/wheat intollerant or Celiac are not addicted to white flour. As a matter of fact, the closer to the true grain of wheat it is the worse my symptoms! This makes a lot of sense because the closer to the true grain it is, the more gluten is in the wheat!

To eat less processed foods is a good goal though in life. Frequent reception of Communion and frequent Confession are good goals. Praise God for your own delivery from a sin!

Brenda V.


#13

My husband was diagnosed with celiac’s about three years ago. I use Bette Hagman’s Gluten Free Gourmet cookbook (revised edition). One thing I like about it is that it has a section on “hidden glutens”. That’s where we found out about the wheat in soy sauce. She also has a section that describes the various flours you can buy–we use white rice flour as a basic wheat flour substitute, but there are tons more.

In terms of adjustments, you’ll have to make a habit of reading labels for those hidden glutens. Also, make sure when you go to restaurants to ask what is in food. My husband tells the waiter that he has a “wheat allergy” because that’s easier for them to understand. When you order salads, be sure to ask if they come with croutons.

In terms of food, we agree that the Tinkyada pasta is best and rice pasta is better than corn pasta, hands down. We buy a lot of things at Whole Foods, although the Shaws near us now has a gluten-free aisle. We buy sausages, brats, and the like at WF because they’re “natural”, so they often don’t contain gluten. Also, WF has their own line of gluten-free baked goods. Their pizza crusts are the best we’ve had and my husband likes their gf sandwich bread best. There are also good gf mixes for pie crusts, brownies, cakes, etc.

With a little experimenting you can modify many recipes. We used the WF sandwich bread in a Joy of Cooking stuffing recipe for Thanksgiving and it was delicious!

And don’t worry–you’ll find something to eat. After his initial diagnosis dh lost 15 pounds. After we figured out what he could eat, he gained it all back!


#14

[quote=jbuttrey]I beg to differ with the don’t eat the host people. Come now Catholics this is the body of Christ.

Gluten problems are associated with refined white baked yeast expanded flour ingestion. It addicts as the refined carbohydrate stops seritonin productions in the brain and replaces it with a endorphin high. Search the internet, see a good doctor who knows nutrition and advocates no sugar and white flour. The daniel diet vegetables and water is the perfect cure it may be extreme for you yet.

Pray for your addiction to bread confess it, I had it, and take the eucharist as often as you can for healing, it healed me of all my sexual sins far worse than food addictions.

Brother John
[/quote]

You are mistaken about Celiac disease. It is a true Allergy. It is the most misdiagnosed allergy , and is actually more common than milk allergies. We are seeing a pediatric gastronologist for my daughter’s problems and believe me, we do not have a bread addiction. Have you tried telling someone with a peanut allergy that they are just addicted to peanuts? Please do you own google search for celiac disease or look it up on www.webmd.com


#15

celiac

I found this site helpful.


#16

Hi - I’m late chiming in here. I’ll start a new thread. See “Hey You Celiacs!”
~donna


#17

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=104251
Here it is.

Not to step on anyones toes - there’s some very good advice here too, but just want to warn about the cup: try to be one of the first recipients of the cup b/c some women wear lipstick which often contains wheat. I know the host is the body of Christ, but the accidents of bread and wine still remain after transubstantiation and your body reacts to it the same way it would before transubstantiation. I wouldn’t recommend taking a small piece either. I know some people who do this, but you are not truly gf until you elimate the smallest amounts of it. Some people even have to change their detergents for their clothing before seeing improvement, so, eating a small amount is a no-no ;).

For celiac-safe low-gluten hosts, try here: benedictinesisters.org/altarbread/orderform.html

:smiley: Godspeed!
~donna


#18

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