Good article about Communion


#1

:slight_smile: I thought this was a good article and contains some helpful advice. Just wanted to share it with you all. God bless!! :slight_smile:

members.core.com/~orcat27/rosary3.htm


#2

(just a little point, where it quotes the 2nd Vatican Council and says "At the Last Supper, the night in which He was betrayed, Jesus initiated the Eucharistic Sacrifice of His Body and Blood, in order to continue the Sacrifice of the Cross throughout the centuries until His return.” It’s still talking about the one original sacrifice at Calvary, which is indeed finished, and there is no ‘second’ one at each Mass. Nor does this deny the Resurrection. Just thought I’d mention that cause I was really confused until this was explained to me).


#3

Monica thank you for sharing the insightful article.
God bless you :slight_smile:


#4

Hi all.
It has been 3 years since I have posted on this Forum.
I hope I am not offensive to anyone, as I am not a Catholic.

I have partaken of the “Lord’s Supper” many times, mostly in the Church of Christ, and have never been taught that it was actually Jesus residing in me through the bread and wine (juice) and after reading the article I get the impression that Catholics actually experence something physical? A feeling of him being inside of you? Is that correct?
I was always taught that we did it in remembrence of him. LIke it was symbolic. What that article sounded like was that it was much more than that.Right?


#5

What that article sounded like was that it was much more than that.Right?

Allison, welcome back to CAF.
To answer your question, the answer is yes. The Holy Communion Catholics receive during Mass is the real presence of Christ.

The bread and wine after consecration (after priest blessed it during Mass), become the real body, blood, soul, and divinity of Christ though the appearance of the bread and wine remain the same. This is called transubstantiation. This is a mystery.

But if we can believe God creates the universe, if we can believe the incarnation and virgin birth, we should have no problem to believe in transubstantiation. Plus, this is based on Jesus’ own words at the Last Supper when he broke the bread, blessed it and said, “This is my body……”

Is means “is”. Jesus did not say “this is the symbol of my body”. **He said ,“This is my body.” **

Hope this helps.


#6

Hi, welcome to the forum!! :slight_smile: and don’t worry, not offensive at all!

I have partaken of the “Lord’s Supper” many times, mostly in the Church of Christ, and have never been taught that it was actually Jesus residing in me through the bread and wine (juice) and after reading the article I get the impression that Catholics actually experence something physical? A feeling of him being inside of you? Is that correct?
I was always taught that we did it in remembrence of him. LIke it was symbolic. What that article sounded like was that it was much more than that.Right?

we believe that in the Catholic (and Orthodox) church, it’s not just bread and wine but Christ’s literal Body and Blood, Soul, and Divinity… the priest says a prayer by which the Holy Spirit transforms the bread and wine into His actual, risen, Flesh and Blood, but it still LOOKS like bread and wine. (in some miraculous cases, it actually changed in appearance, usually when people were doubting… miraclerosarymission.org/lanciano.html)
So when we receive Communion (the Eucharist), we actually receive Christ into ourselves and He unites Himself to us :slight_smile:

In most Protestant churches, such as Church of Christ, it is taught that it is a symbol, and since there is no consecration (prayer), it is a symbol.

We believe that Christ meant it literally when He said “this is My Body…” :slight_smile:

to answer your question, sometimes people do feel Jesus inside them after Communion. Sometimes they feel they’re in His presence when they go to Adoration, which is silent prayer before the Eucharist in a church. The Sacrament is present in every Catholic Church in a golden box called the Tabernacle, usually someplace around the altar, and there’s a red lamp always burning above it.

If you’re interested, here is some more info…
davidmacd.com/catholic/eucharist.htm

I know it probably sounds really mysterious, and indeed it’s a great mystery, I myself don’t understand on an intellectual level how Christ can be physically present there and in Heaven all at once, but it’s His risen (glorified) Body so I guess He’s not subject to the laws of nature :wink: but the reason I started believing in this (I used to believe it’s symbolic too and that’s what I was taught) is because of my own experience with the Eucharist.

btw, we agree that it’s “in remembrance of Him”, but in the Greek, “remembrance” means actually re-presenting something, not just mentally remembering :wink:

hope that answers your question…

God bless you!


#7

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