Good book about Catholicism for a non-Catholic spouse


#1

Hey everyone!

It’s very weird posting on here again. The last time I was on these forums, I was 18, just graduated from high school, and had no idea what God had in store for my life. Since then, I’ve earned my undergrad degree in Theology, Youth Ministry, and Spanish, am earning my masters in Biblical Theology at the Augustine Institute in Denver, and am currently a Catholic high school teacher and volleyball/tennis coach. It’s good to be back!

I have a question to throw out there. God suprised me by leading my into a very special relationship with a non-Catholic. He was raised Lutheran, but doesn’t really practice his faith. I have always dreamed of having a true Catholic family and holding my husband’s hand before the Blessed Sacrament, but it seems that God is asking something else of my heart right now, and I have begun discerning marriage together with this man. While he doesn’t feel called to conversion yet, he is very open and supportive of my faith-he goes to Mass with me, prays the Rosary with me, talks about the Church with me, and has agreed to raise our children fully Catholic.

Recently, he asked if he might read the Theology of the Body book I had with me because he wanted to start learning even more about my faith so that he could understand it as well as possible in order to raise our children in the Church. Needless to say, I was a little hesitant to give him JPII’s full text as his first attempt at understanding the Church. I have since been looking around the different Catholic publishers for a really good book about the essentials of Catholicism specifically for a non-Catholic who might be entering into marriage with a Catholic. I’m learning toward something written by the Hahns, but I thought I’d through the question out here to see if any of you knew of a particulary inspired and helpful book?

Thank you so much for your help and, please, your prayers for God’s will in this!

In Christ’s Smile,

Brittany


#2

Well, there are lots of good books. "Rome Sweet Home'" by the Hahns is good as a personal story, and quite readable. "Catholicism for Dummies" is a good overview of Catholicism.


#3

[quote="JimG, post:2, topic:227146"]
Well, there are lots of good books. "Rome Sweet Home'" by the Hahns is good as a personal story, and quite readable. "Catholicism for Dummies" is a good overview of Catholicism.

[/quote]

From rumours I have heard, 'Catholicism for Dummies' might not be the best choice.


#4

Why Do Catholics Do That?

I learned A TON from this book.


#5

What Catholics Really Believe

Another great option.


#6

I asked a similar question a while back. It might be helpful for you to look it over. :)

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=481269


#7

[quote="CheesusPowerKid, post:1, topic:227146"]
Hey everyone!

It's very weird posting on here again. The last time I was on these forums, I was 18, just graduated from high school, and had no idea what God had in store for my life. Since then, I've earned my undergrad degree in Theology, Youth Ministry, and Spanish, am earning my masters in Biblical Theology at the Augustine Institute in Denver, and am currently a Catholic high school teacher and volleyball/tennis coach. It's good to be back!

Thank you so much for your help and, please, your prayers for God's will in this!

In Christ's Smile,

Brittany

[/quote]

Youi mentioned Scott Hahn, so I presume you are aware of his books. I would recommend from him the following:

Swear to God-the promise of the Sacraments and Signs of Life.

You may want to look into Joseph Ratzinger's books,in particular-Introduction to the CCC, Principles of Catholic theology,


#8

[quote="PiousTemplar, post:3, topic:227146"]
From rumours I have heard, 'Catholicism for Dummies' might not be the best choice.

[/quote]

"Catholicism For Dummies", co-authored by Fathers John Trigilio and Kenneth Brighenti? I haven't heard anything bad about it.


#9

[quote="JimG, post:8, topic:227146"]
"Catholicism For Dummies", co-authored by Fathers John Trigilio and Kenneth Brighenti? I haven't heard anything bad about it.

[/quote]

This was actually discussed a while back . There is another book out there with a similar name as "Catholicism for Dummies" that is not recommended. Apparently the two get confused often. Just wondering if that is the book the poster was thinking of?

At any rate, I have "Catholicism for Dummies" and really enjoyed it! :)


#10

I’m probably stating the obvious but-

Have a copy of the Catechism of the Catholic Church handy. I don’t think you should give it to him to read, but available as a reference as he asks specific questions. Or bookmark the following website (a parish which has put the CCC on-line in searchable format):

scborromeo.org/ccc.htm

“Surprised by Truth” Patrick Madrid gives the accounts of several protestant ministers who converted to Catholicism


#11

My husband, a former Baptist who is now in RCIA, devours anything by Mark Shea.


#12

The other book you are thinking of is, I believe, “The Complete Idiots Guide to Catholicism.” That one is not particularly recommended, but the “Dummies” book by Fr. Trigilio is OK. Dummies-yes, Idiots, no.


#13

I really recommend “Catholicism for Dummies” also. It gives a really good overview of Catholicism, and it was easy to understand and explained all relevant terminology. I already had a good understanding of Catholicism by the 12th week of RCIA (by which point I had read this book, and I already had a good knowledge of Christian beliefs as I was raised Christian) but my friend asked me a really basic question about Catholic belief, and really had no knowledge of the reasoning behind “sticky issues” and had no understanding of the hierarchy within the Church. I brought her a copy of the book as a present and she sent me a text the day after saying how amazing the book was and how it all seemed less confusing now! Several days after that, she had read through most of it and felt much more knowledgeable and was asking more “knowledgeable” questions at RCIA. :slight_smile:


#14

How about the Catechism of the Catholic Church?


#15

[quote="JimG, post:2, topic:227146"]
Well, there are lots of good books. "Rome Sweet Home'" by the Hahns is good as a personal story, and quite readable. "Catholicism for Dummies" is a good overview of Catholicism.

[/quote]

Good Gravy. If I ever meet a Catholic who DOESN'T recommend "Rome Sweet Home" I'll shake their hand and buy them the cocktail of their choice. Read it and found it just horrid.


#16

I wonder if Rediscovering Catholicism would be a good option in this situation. I think it talks about the faith in fairly simple terms.

Is it possible he would be interested in attending RCIA? As far as I know, it is meant to teach the Faith to fallen away Catholics/Catholics who need to finish their sacraments as well as those interested in converting. In other words, the main purpose is to educate...and there is no obligation to convert. But, hey, you never know what can happen! ;-)


#17

Thank you so much, everyone! I'm excited to start looking thorugh these books! Say a prayer for us, we'll probably choose one to read together during Lent!

In Christ's Smile,

Britty


#18

1) the life of sigrid undset, I don't have a book title, she won the Nobel prize for literature for her medieval fiction

2) Kristin Lavransdatter, the trilogy she is most famous for. 14th century Norway, Kristin defies her father and breaks her betrothal, a serious issue, to marry for love. It doesn't turn out well except she loves her children and loves her husband but they were not suited to each other. Then at the end she performs spiritual actions to redeem herself, keeping it vague. I prefer the modern translation by Tiina Nunnally.

Undset was a convert to Catholocism. she wrote other books.

good luck!


#19

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