Good morning Answer ASAP

How do I know when I am forgiven of my sins? and If I am forgiven, why do I still feel guilt?

You are forgiven when the priest declares absolution. You still feel guilty? That means you are a good person! A little guilt is okay because it reminds you not to do the same thing again.

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You can be certain your sin is forgiven at the very moment the priest grants absolution.

Guilt is one of the effects of sin. Forgiveness does not vitiate the effects of sin. We see this even with original sin. As result of the fall, man lost physical incorruptibility. The sin is forgiven, washed away, and we are made clean in baptism, yet we still get sick, old and die.

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We have a very nice huge picture of Jesus Divine Mercy right between where the Priest and the Penitent sit. Usually when I am finished with Confession Father will say go your sins are forgiven and he points to the picture and says remember His Divine Mercy. So it helps to remember that His Mercy is endless and NONE of ours sins could be stronger than His Divine Mercy.

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“His Mercy is endless and NONE of ours sins could be stronger than His Divine Mercy.” So beautifully said.

Edited for clarity.

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One of my big fear is when I die and confess my sin, that god will change his mind and send me to hell?

God would never change his mind and sent soneone who is repentant to hell, because he WANTS you to be with him.

If you sincerely repent and make a good confession, you can be sure that all your past sins have been forgiven. God’s mercy doesn’t play tricks.

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You do not “feel” forgiven, you KNOW that you’re forgiven. Just because you feel guilty, does not mean that you are guilty.

It can be dangerous to base things on feelings, because they are subjective, not objective.

You know that you’re forgiven when you are truly sorry for your sins, intend not to sin again, intend to avoid the proximate occaisions of sin, confess your sin, and the priest gives you absolution, then you are forgiven.

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It is not within God’s nature to change. Ever. Anything. He is “unchanging”.

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I think that Satan tries to get us to feel guilty about forgiven sins to drive us into despair with guilt and doubt. When that happens I truly say aloud “Get behind me, Satan, I have been absolved of these sins , you Father of Lies”.

That’s all it takes for me to alleviate that good ole’ Catholic guilt we are somewhat known for.

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I’m glad you included the participation required on our part.
It’s important for people to realize that if they are not sorry for their sins, and/or have no intention of trying to avoid committing the sin again, then even though they confess it to the priest and he speaks the words of absolution, the sin is not forgiven.

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Yes. I feel like a lot of Catholics don’t realize that the form of the sacrament of confession comes from the PENITENT.

Actually you have it a bit twisted. The “form” of the sacrament comes from the priest in absolution. The “matter” of the sacrament comes from the penitent. But your basic point is a good one.

Even if you 100% plan on sinning again? I doubt it.

Here is how the Catechism says it:

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Right, sorry. I meant to say matter.

So if I commit the same sin god would not forgive it?

I was speaking directly to the OP, not generally and she/he clearly is a contrite penitent. Moreover, I am not ever going to presume the contrary of someone who actually is availing themselves of the sacrament, which she obviously is.

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As long as you had the intention to do your best to avoid the sin again at the time of your confession, it is forgiven, regardless of whether you actually are successful in you effort to avoid the sin in the future.

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I have disgusting thoughts about god and Jesus, and I don’t how to control my thoughts! If I go to confession every month will god forgive me

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