Good old Christological definition

not sure where to put this, not scripture, not liturgy, not moral theology, I guess here.

What are some officialy approved by the church statements as to the identity and nature of Christ. I am aware of the definition of Chalcedon, but what about any others? I am looking for something perhaps bizarrely specific. I would like a Christological definition of some sort from before the council of trent but after Chalcedon, essentially something which is fairly official and sums up the medieval belief as to the Identity, nature, and accomplishment of our Lord. I am looking for this for a good reason, but I wonder if you know of something which sums up the Christology of the west before the enlightenment, the quest for the historical Jesus, the wacky and the strange and whatever else has arisen in people’s minds since then.

You should expand your library to include Denzinger’s “Source of Catholic Dogma” and use the Systematic Index (topical index) that’s in the back of the book.

amazon.com/Sources-Catholic-Dogma-Henry-Denzinger/dp/1930278225

The book is online (catecheticsonline.com/SourcesofDogma.php ), but unfortunately it does not include the Index.

Third Council of Constantinople, 680 A.D.: Following the five holy and universal synods and the holy and accepted fathers, and defining in unison, it professes our lord Jesus Christ our true God, one of the holy Trinity, which is of one same being and is the source of life, to be perfect in divinity and perfect in humanity, the same truly God and truly man, of a rational soul and a body; consubstantial with the Father as regards his divinity, and the same consubstantial with us as regards his humanity, like us in all respects except for sin; begotten before the ages from the Father as regards his divinity, and in the last days the same for us and for our salvation from the holy Spirit and the virgin Mary, who is properly and truly called mother of God, as regards his humanity; one and the same Christ, Son, Lord, only-begotten, acknowledged in** two natures** which undergo no confusion, no change, no separation, no division; at no point was the difference between the natures taken away through the union, but rather the property of both natures is preserved and comes together into** a single subsistent being** [in unam personam et in unam subsistentiam concurrente]; he is not parted or divided into two persons, but is one and the same only-begotten Son, Word of God, lord Jesus Christ, just as the prophets taught from the beginning about him, and as Jesus the Christ himself instructed us, and as the creed of the holy fathers handed it down to us.

And* we proclaim equally*** two** natural volitions or wills in him and two natural principles of action which undergo no division, no change, no partition, no confusion, in accordance with the teaching of the holy fathers. And the two natural wills not in opposition, as the impious heretics said, far from it, but his human will following, and not resisting or struggling, rather in fact subject to his divine and all powerful will. For the will of the flesh had to be moved, and yet to be subjected to the divine will, according to the most wise Athanasius. For just as his flesh is said to be and is flesh of the Word of God, so too the natural will of his flesh is said to and does belong to the Word of God, just as he says himself: [INDENT]I have come down from heaven, not to do my own will, but the will of the Father who sent me,
calling his own will that of his flesh, since his flesh too became his own. For in the same way that his all holy and blameless animate flesh was not destroyed in being made divine but remained in its own limit and category, so his human will as well was not destroyed by being made divine, but rather was preserved, according to the theologian Gregory, who says: “For his willing, when he is considered as saviour, is not in opposition to God, being made divine in its entirety.”
And we hold there to be two natural principles of action in the same Jesus Christ our lord and true God, which undergo no division, no change, no partition, no confusion, that is, a divine principle of action and a human principle of action, according to the godly-speaking Leo, who says most clearly: “For each form does in a communion with the other that activity which it possesses as its own, the Word working that which is the Word’s and the body accomplishing the things that are the body’s”.
For of course we will not grant the existence of only a single natural principle of action of both God and creature, lest we raise what is made to the level of divine being, or indeed reduce what is most specifically proper to the divine nature to a level befitting creatures for we acknowledge that the miracles and the sufferings are of one and the same according to one or the other of the two natures out of which he is and in which he has his being, as the admirable Cyril said. Therefore, protecting on all sides the “no confusion” and “no division”, we announce the whole in these brief words:Believing our lord Jesus Christ, even after his incarnation, to be one of the holy Trinity and our true God, we say that** he has two natures [naturas] shining forth in his one subsistence**[subsistentia] in which he demonstrated the miracles and the sufferings throughout his entire providential dwelling here, not in appearance but in truth, the difference of the natures being made known in the same one subsistence in that each nature wills and performs the things that are proper to it in a communion with the other; then in accord with this reasoning we hold that two natural wills and principles of action meet in correspondence for the salvation of the human race.
papalencyclicals.net/Councils/ecum06.htm
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