Good place to celebrate Divine Liturgy in NYC?


#1

Hi folks -

Just a “Latin” Catholic who will be passing through NYC sometime in the Summer to visit friends and deal with career/business.

Was wondering if that would be a good location to try and take in Divine Liturgy.

I’m a little reluctant because a number of Filipino friends of mine in various locations in the US have tried to knock on your doors with varying levels of success. The Pastor/Priests are always welcoming… the Congregation on the other hand…

From my perspective its understandable, random stranger showing up in an ethnocentric church where everbody know everybody else must seem a little weird. the Last thing i want to do is for my presence to cause some sort of disruption.

If anyone has any suggestions, i’m listening. :slight_smile:

Peace be with you all.


#2

St Patrick’s, in the heart of NYC and one of my all time favorite Church’s…

If you end up on the island look up St Agnes, in rockville centre. It’s a really nice one as well but a drive from the city…


#3

St. George’s Ukrainian Church on the lower east side has daily liturgies, and is just a couple of blocks from the Lexington Ave. subway.

There is also a Ukrainian Museum adjacent to the church you may want to visit too.

Its New York City after all, I think that they are used to tourists, I think that the people there are going to be as welcome to you as anyone else in New York City would be.

brama.com/stgeorge/


#4

Since he posted in Eastern Catholicism, I am guessing that the OP is looking for an Eastern Catholic Divine Liturgy, not a Latin rite Mass.


#5

I’ve never been there, but I’ve heard good things about St. Michael’s Russian Catholic Church.

stmichaelruscath.org/


#6

St. Mary’s on E15th is nice too. I think they’re Ruthenian.


#7

Thank you and everyone else.

So ive got three shots at doing an Eastern Catholic liturgy

Russians, Ruthenians, and Ukranians. Im surprised no Greeks !

Ah well - in my most highly Unscientific and Unspiritual method of choosing first attempt

My ex was Ukranian - feisty as hell and loved every minute of it till she left the country. Guess ill start there . :wink:

If any one can suggest any books to help follow along with the service id be much obliged.


#8

[quote=]I’m a little reluctant because a number of Filipino friends of mine in various locations in the US have tried to knock on your doors with varying levels of success. The Pastor/Priests are always welcoming… the Congregation on the other hand…

From my perspective its understandable, random stranger showing up in an ethnocentric church where everbody know everybody else must seem a little weird. the Last thing i want to do is for my presence to cause some sort of disruption.
[/quote]

Take this for what it’s worth, as I have absolutely no experience with any of the parishes mentioned.

In the parishes that I’m familiar with, everybody knows everybody else, regardless of ethnicity. Some parishes are more ethnic than others and more welcoming to those outside of their ethnicity than others. I noticed that the Ukrainian Church’s website is mostly in Ukrainian. If it matters to you, you might want to check and see if their liturgies are in English. Also, you want your first experience to be a well-done liturgy. I have heard great things about St. Michael’s. Here is a review from a few years ago catholicmanhattan.blogspot.com/2009/07/69-st-michaels-chapel-russian-catholic.html

As far as following along, it will vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Translations vary, as well as the amount of English used. If you go to the Ruthenian liturgy, it will likely be all in English and the pew book can be found at the website for the Metropolitan Cantor Institute. mci.archpitt.org/servicebooks/DivineLiturgies.pdf

I hope it all goes well for you! Please check back in and tell us how it turned out.


#9

Newly traditionalized Malankara Syriac Catholic Cathedral in 1500 Depaul St, Elmont, NY 11003.

Pastor - Rev. Fr. Noby Ayyaneth
Associate Pastor - Rev. Fr. Jerry Mathew
SUNDAY
Morning Prayers:
10:45 a.m.
Holy Qurbono (Divine Liturgy) follows

DIVINE LITURGY
Wednesday: 6:30 p.m.
Saturday: 8:00 a.m.


#10

In the spirit of Gregory of Nyssa submitting to his sister Macrinas sensible advice, I take your comments to heart.

St. Michaels might actually make more sense at the end of the day anyway, it seems to be near to a Latin rite church I’ve been to on several occasions due to Weddings/Baptisms.

Given the time frame I only have about 2 chances - I’ll start with the Russians and move to the Ruthenians as a contrast. And maybe sneak in sometime with the Ukranians over the weekday.

I’ll post a “review” of my experiences when I get the chance.

Thank you so much for your help!


#11

Given that I have friends from Kerala who subscribe to the Orthodox tradition - this would be most welcome and highly intriguing…

Except I have no clue where Elmont is. Perhaps at another time :wink:


#12

:thumbsup:

goo.gl/iW5obg


#13

In Brooklyn NY is the Maronite Cathedral: Our Lady of Lebanon - 113 Remsen St.
(718) 624-7228. They have a Sunday 9 AM & 11:30 AM Mass! On there website they have directions both by car and by subway.


#14

St. Michael’s is indeed worth attending.


#15

Hi all - having an interesting if rocky start to this whole trip as it is.

Visited a few of the Byzantine Rite churches already - trying to figure out a way to get to Elmont via Mass Transit to the Syro-Malankarans.

A person I met from i’m assuming the Archdiocese pointed out the existence of a Coptic Catholic Chapel in Brooklyn and and a group of Eritrean Catholics who apparently share the same space with an Eritrean Orthodox and Latin Rite Catholic group.

I came rather well prepared for the Byzantine rite Churches in terms of Liturgy… and I did find some Syro-Malankaran pdfs as well.

Can’t seem to find anything on Coptics or the Ge’ez Ethiopian/Eritrean rites.

Am I to assume they have never been translated into English?

Would the Divine Liturgy format be the same if i used one of the Oriental Orthodox translations?

That last bit seems to be more of a problem with our Coptic Catholic brethren, if i am to interpret the various mardukm vs dzheremi debates that seem to have been a thing around here long before i showed up on CAF…


#16

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