Gorgeous pictures of Abbey of Regina Laudis


#1

here:

photoshelter.com/c/falcetti/gallery/La-Vita-Monastica/G0000IQOa9HH3N3s/

A very unusual abbey, unique in the US. They sing the full office in Gregorian chant (in latin, of course) and sing the mass in Latin, too. I don’t know precisely if it’s Roman rite or what. The nuns are highly educated. The have constitutional enclosure in which people can visit them but they don’t usually go out except for 'important ’ things–well, one was visiting an artist’s studio–which was willed to the monastery. They have a lot of land, and farm, like Walburga in CO

The picture of the two novices watching their foundress being lowered into her grave is very moving. The funeral mass included Franciscan Srs. of the Eucharist.


#2

Unless something drastic has happened in the years since I was at St. Walburga's, Regina Laudis is very much in line with Rome. They were the first community of Benedictine women in the U.S. to be raised to the level of Abbey. St. Walburga's was the second. The nuns at the Abbey of St. Walburga pray the office in English, except on Solemnities -- but that certainly may have changed in the 20+ years since I was there :)

Gert


#3

[quote="anode, post:1, topic:194960"]
here:

photoshelter.com/c/falcetti/gallery/La-Vita-Monastica/G0000IQOa9HH3N3s/

A very unusual abbey, unique in the US. They sing the full office in Gregorian chant (in latin, of course) and sing the mass in Latin, too. I don't know precisely if it's Roman rite or what. The nuns are highly educated. The have constitutional enclosure in which people can visit them but they don't usually go out except for 'important ' things--well, one was visiting an artist's studio--which was willed to the monastery. They have a lot of land, and farm, like Walburga in CO

The picture of the two novices watching their foundress being lowered into her grave is very moving. The funeral mass included Franciscan Srs. of the Eucharist.

[/quote]

Wow! I live about 20 minutes away from there, and I have never heard about it until this year! That's so amazing. Good find, my friend!


#4

These are beautiful pictures. Thank you so much for sharing!


#5

No, “Roman Rite” as in the “Roman” in Roman Catholic, vs. Byzantine Catholic or something like that :slight_smile:


#6

What neat pictures from the Abbey!

That is so cool about General George Patton’s granddaughter being a nun of Regina Laudis! I knew about Mother Benedict Duss and her World War II experience. Didn’t know there were Catholics in Patton’s family. [good ol’ ‘Blood and Guts’ :slight_smile: ]

I’m surprised there wasn’t a picture of Mother Dolores Hart, the former movie actress. She played the role of St. Clare in the film ‘Francis of Assisi’.

Man, those nuns work really hard!


#7

I did not mean to imply that Regina Laudis *wasn’t * ‘in line with Rome’. i was referring to their rite of the mass-my understanding is that the so-called 'extraordinary ’ rite is now called the Roman rite. RL sings all of the office in Latin, I am assuming most or all of the mass also, maybe not including the lessons. This info is on their website.


#8

[quote="John_Monaco, post:3, topic:194960"]
Wow! I live about 20 minutes away from there, and I have never heard about it until this year! That's so amazing. Good find, my friend!

[/quote]

Get to know them. You'll be glad you did.


#9

Yes, their work ethic is very striking. Rise at midnight–full office, including Matins, maybe Prime? Farming, cheesemaking, husbandry of the land. They have interns and a lot of hospitality. Walburga in CO also farms–both of them in a tough northern climate. They do accept–RL, that is–older vocs, I think, but stamina is definitely a must.


#10

[quote="anode, post:9, topic:194960"]
Yes, their work ethic is very striking. Rise at midnight--full office, including Matins, maybe Prime? Farming, cheesemaking, husbandry of the land. They have interns and a lot of hospitality. Walburga in CO also farms--both of them in a tough northern climate. They do accept--RL, that is--older vocs, I think, but stamina is definitely a must.

[/quote]

Ora et labora -- Work and pray. That is the Benedictine motto, for lack of a better word.

Back in the days when I was investigating contemplative communities, however, I never found a single community that didn't have an intense work and prayer ethic. Poor Clares, Carmelites, Benedictines (the orders I visited) -- all of them had a schedule that would try the stamina of the most well-trained athelete :D But when that life is embraced for the love of God and the salvation of souls, the burden is light.

Anode, is Regina Laudis a community you are considering for yourself?

Gertie


#11

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