Gov. Cuomo of NY to Start Funding College Courses for Inmates

#21

You’ll never get rid of criminal background checks for employment because what would the repercussions be for an employer of a daycare or school to hire a convicted sex offender who did his/her time.

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#22

I understand, but that’s a lot of “ifs” for a state that is, according to the same governor, trying to reduce its tax burden and reign in spending.

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#23

Those middle class citizens I was referring to who work hard, play by the rules, and pay their own way, aren’t generally directly affected by street crime. I know it sounds callous, and I would never use that as the only basis for opposing such a policy. However, frankly, I think vocational type of training–such as being a car mechanic, plumber, etc–might be more appropriate. I don’t think you are going to have ex-cons becoming doctors, lawyers, accountants, engineers, teachers, or nurses. Institutions that employ all those professions would probably not want to hire an ex-con.

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#24

Do you know what courses the prisoners will be taking? And why should it matter to you what they study - as long as the education is not wasted? The last thing we need is a caste-system in education. Education choices should match the country’s needs to the student’s abilities and interests. That’s all. It’s not like the prison doors are some clear demarcating line between the “good” people and the “bad” people. How many young men are sitting in jail right now for indulging in waay less vice and crime than was portrayed in 5 seconds of the “Wolf of Wall Street”? (And yes, I saw the interview with the real live person the film was based on).

If Cuomo is going to offer an education to prisoners, I’d hope it would be as good as the one I’d want for myself or my loved ones.

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#25

You can’t decry organizations from protecting themselves and their property by doing BG checks, all the while castigating the CIA and NSA for letting a guy like Snowden pass a BG check (although contractors handle the BG checks, not govies).

The security clearance process if far more extensive, but many companies have a right and a duty in many cases to protect themselves and their customers.

I am sympathetic to the guy who gets a felony at 18 and turns his life around, but it is obviously a delicate balance.

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#26

Some jobs a BG check is necessary, like day care workers, doctors, bank workers, etc. but for EVERY job to require a BG check…no, that is not needed and only continues that persons sentence on indefinitely.

It is fairly odd that BG checks by nearly all employers have really only been the norm since about late 90s, early 2000s…so before that, no one saw the need or ??? The technology was there, but they did not do them before this time for some reason…makes me wonder who was behind this change. I think the for profit prison system may have had a part to play in this, after all, it is in their best interest to keep people committing crimes, BG checks by all employers would lead a criminal to stay in the criminal lifestyle if they cannot get hired by a regular employer…hmmm?

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#27

Do you realize not everything in life is a conspiracy? The technology is now readily available, and I’d bet that and the number of lawsuits and amount of liability companies have been faced with drove the perceived change.

There is no cabal seeking to keep criminals within their walls by the Prison Illuminate. Not everything in life is the plot of Metal Gear Solid 2.

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#28

If they are in a program such as this, they should be able to study what they want. I don’t have an issue with that. I can also see the merits of this program. However, there are many folks in NY struggling to send their kids to college. If there is no money for them, there is no money for this, regardless of the potentially reduction in recidivism. Sorry.

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#29

So long as he is using New York State taxpayers’ money, and through their representatives, New Yorkers approve, I see nothing wrong with this.

Jon

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#30

If there is no money for this, then there is even less money to house them for second and third jail terms. Sorry, I just don’t see your argument.

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#31

:rolleyes:

Not a hard concept to understand.

Why are felons who are in jail basically being sent to a Holiday Inn at the tax payers expense, while there are law abiding citizens who are having trouble making ends meet?

I am not saying we should abuse prisoners; but people are porked off because they do the right thing and no one gives a ****.

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#32

That’s a nonsensical statement. What is offered should be strictly controlled, and should have a HEAVY focus towards vocational and employment education. Hopefully they have the brains not to allow them to study 18th century French poetry on the taxpayer dime. Or get a degree in useless fluff degrees.

We’ve got enough Women’s Studies majors with $150k in student debt with no job prospects. The state of NY doesn’t need to pay for more.

This program isn’t terrible in concept, but the program should start small, and have some real pilot programs start first. It shouldn’t be opened to the whole prison population at first, and it should be tied to good behavior in prison as well. Once you see the program in action, and that it works, and prisoners are becoming gainfully employed, then consider expanding it slowly.

And once it gets larger, then focus on closing the prisons you supposedly won’t need.

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#33

I like your idea of a gradual implementation. The sense I was getting is that educating prisoners is like rewarding them for bad behavior and that just does not make sense to me. An education is not something you can just transplant into someone’s brain: they have to ***work at acquiring it in a responsible way ***- regardless of how much money is being spent. Why such efforts at redeeming themselves would be a bad thing is just beyond my ability to grasp.

We would do well to meditate on the parable of the workers in the vineyard and the prodigal son.

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closed #34
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