Gov. Dayton Declares Affordable Care Act ‘No Longer Affordable’


#1

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Minnesota’s Democratic governor said Wednesday that the Affordable Care Act is “no longer affordable,” a stinging critique from a state leader who strongly embraced the law and proudly proclaimed health reform was working in Minnesota just a few years ago.

Gov. Mark Dayton made the comments while addressing questions about Minnesota’s fragile health insurance market, where individual plans are facing double-digit increases after all insurers threatened to exit the market entirely in 2017. He’s the only Democratic governor to publicly suggest the law isn’t working as intended.

minnesota.cbslocal.com/2016/10/12/gov-dayton-affordable-care-act/


#2

It was never meant to be affordable. Everyone know it was built to fail.


#3

My dad is dealing with issues caused by Obamacare. I don’t usually take a political position, but this affects him personally. It needs to be repealed, and the old system needs to be implemented, perhaps with some reform.


#4

It needs to be replaced with the old system. Reformed, perhaps, but it was scores better than the catastrophic Obamacare.


#5

You would think so.


#6

These posts sway no Trump or Clinton supporters, and 6 points difference with four weeks to go is going to take something far more significant…game over…point, set, match.


#7

I always like it when the left counts the chickens before they hatch, especially when the race was supposed to have been over last year, but what does this have to do with the topic at hand?

Speaking of Minnesota, they already have a decent STATE program for healthcare. America just needs to let insurance companies sell across state lines and get the federal government out of it.


#8

There are two ways to get rid of Obamacare.

One is that the legislation has a couple of thousand places in it, in which the specifics are “To Be Determined by the Secretary [of Health and Human Services]”.

So, immediately, on January 21, 2017 Trump could get rid of the 30 hour per week limitation and make many other fixes as well.

Second, Congress can repeal and replace it with an HSA type of program which worked well when it was available prior to ObamaCare. The problem was that it was not available across state lines. Trump has said he would advocate passing an HSA replacement that IS available across state lines.

The State of Indiana had previously adopted an HSA program.

[Pence is former governor of Indiana.]


#9

What is HSA?


#10

Pence is still our governor.:slight_smile: He is hoping for a promotion soon.


#11

Yes. It seems to be clear that no policy, no level of overt corruption, no declaration of undermining individual rights and liberty, will sway the outcome.

Truly sad.

Jon


#12

It is crazy and upsetting how the newish ACA has been handled, everything from the mistakes with the rollout to now the run away insurance costs. it’s been a mess.

It will be interesting if politically costs are ever reformed and adjusted downward as they once were. I personally have my doubts costs will ever go down.

If people want lower costs, Americans will have to be less trusting and more critical of what is offered by our medical system.

On a comparison basis, costs in countries such as the UK’s NHS health care is half the cost to what we have in the US. The end results are largely the same, with life expectancy being slightly longer in the UK compared to America.

Not that America needs to adopt a UK type health care system, or any other countries health care program. We Americans tend to be proud of our medical system. But when looking at the numbers in comparison we Americans pay a huge financial cost for medical service that isn’t simnifically improving our lives. I can’t help but think some of these funds being spent could be better spent elsewhere.

There are many ways that individuals can look to rein in costs. One way that comes to mind is stop taking statin medications. Statins have not been found to increase life spans of any significants. And they come with many side effects. An article that discussing this can be read here ~

How much longer will you live if you take a statin?

drmalcolmkendrick.org/2015/10/27/how-much-longer-will-you-live-if-you-take-a-statin/

Another way to save costs, and have less hassle and worry is to avoid the yearly check up. Even the creator of the ACA has written the yearly medical check up is worthless and wastes billions. One of Dr. Emanuel’s articles to this effect ~

“Skip Your Annual Physical”

nytimes.com/2015/01/09/opinion/skip-your-annual-physical.html?_r=0


#13

You seem to be conflating costs and prices here. Costs cannot be lowered through government dictate. Prices can be capped, but this only creates or increases rationing. Keynesian philosophies have never truly understood this fundamental difference.

If people want lower costs, Americans will have to be less trusting and more critical of what is offered by our medical system.

Or we could re-introduce competition and freedom back into healthcare. Those two things will bring down costs as they have in the past.

On a comparison basis, costs in countries such as the UK’s NHS health care is half the cost to what we have in the US.

This is misleading. What the UK government REPORTS may be half, but that is not the actual costs they are experiencing. Government health programs hide much of their costs.

The end results are largely the same, with life expectancy being slightly longer in the UK compared to America.

This is grossly misleading. You aren’t comparing apples to apples. In the US, if a baby takes even one breath of air, it is considered a live birth. In other countries, the baby must live for a certain period of time before it is counted as a live birth. Ergo, their infant mortality and life expectancy rates will look better than the US rates, but not because they have better medical care. They just don’t count babies who die too quickly.

And additionally, the US has a 3rd world country on its southern border, with tens of millions of these poor immigrants pouring into the country. These people bring poor health, bad diets, disease and other issues that lead to lower life expectancy. These factors HUGELY affect the US number.

Not that America needs to adopt a UK type health care system, or any other countries health care program. We Americans tend to be proud of our medical system. But when looking at the numbers in comparison we Americans pay a huge financial cost for medical service that isn’t simnifically improving our lives. I can’t help but think some of these funds being spent could be better spent elsewhere.

Costs for healthcare have only increased the more government has gotten involved in healthcare. For medical procedures that have not had this influence, the costs have decreased dramatically. The answer is less government, more competition, and more freedom.

There are many ways that individuals can look to rein in costs.

The US system has effectively separated the purchaser of a service (the patient) from the payment of the service (insurance/government). When this happens, people stop asking how much a procedure or test costs. They stop asking if it’s really necessary. They stop calling around to see who can perform a test/procedure for a better price. This causes a huge artificial increase in demand for medical services and prices start to rise dramatically.


#14

How very sad this is


#15

To Chief of All Governors?


#16

As long as you want government to interfere, why not make it single-payer? Or do you not think Trump becomes government once he takes office?

The problem was that it was not available across state lines. Trump has said he would advocate passing an HSA replacement that IS available across state lines.

Blue Cross/Blue Shield in many cases works across state lines. The problem is that the state regulators control insurance and determine appropriate premiums to whom, among other things. Someone living in New York and using their hospitals would not be able to buy insurance from South Carolina’s based-insurance companies, for example. Not unless they’re able to adjust their premiums for out-of-state insurees. There already are public outcries against charging different premiums.

I’ve used HSA but these aren’t designed for catastrophic medical costs.


#17

Don’t most vote their pocketbooks, though? Neither can deliver lower premiums, which are probably more dependent on interest rates and amount of coverage sought. Rates of return on the reserves insurance companies hold are what’s really dismal.

And for the record, I wouldn’t vote for Clinton even if she were to turn pro-life. But the thought of Trump’s negotiating or defaulting on our national debt the same way he did with his own loans frankly terrifies me.


#18

Same here. As does his idea that the NATO treaty isn’t really binding.


#19

Here is what happened, quietly, on January 1, 2016:

Medicare tax went from 1.45% to 2.35%

Top Income tax bracket went from 35% to 39.6%

Top Income payroll tax went from 37.4% to 52.2%

Capital Gains tax went from 15% to 28%

Dividend tax went from 15% to 39.6%

Estate tax went from 0% to 55%

A 3.5% Real Estate transaction tax was added.

Remember these facts:

These taxes were all passed solely with Democrat votes.
Not a single Republican voted for these new taxes.
These taxes were all passed in the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare.


#20

I really get tired of the every-four-year canard that the rich don’t pay their “fair share”. Class envy demagoguery.


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