Greek words


#1

Where do Catholics go to see the Greek word used in a passage? Protestants use the Strong numbering system, but I understand that Catholics do not. I have used sites like netbible.org. where that numbering system is used. All I need to do on that site is double click on the word I am interested in and the site sends me to the Greek word and it its definition. Is there a Catholic version of this type of site?


#2

I'll be honest, I have no idea.

But if you want my advice: I'm currently teaching myself NT Greek. If you really want to dig into the meanings of the English words and how they compare to the original Greek, teaching yourself is only the real way to do it. This way, you can really come to understand the whole of NT Greek instead of just looking up the Greek words in an online dictionary. You can have a full-blown understanding instead of a fragmentary understanding; many Protestants try to argue the Greek definitions that fit their mistaken theology. The vast majority of these Protestants do not even have an elementary background in the language so they really have no idea what they are arguing.

The problem I see with Strong's numbers is that they are linked with the KJV right? That doesn't really help with us. Unfortunately, I am forced to use it. All the most common Greek dictionaries are written by Protestant publishers; there isn't really one way to get around this. However, if you ever read any Catholic Bible studies, the actual Greek words are described in Catholic understanding. It's also possible to check out Greek Catholic/Greek Orthodox websites in discussion of the original Greek words; who knows Greek better than the Greek Catholic and Orthodox Churches right?

You're going to get a lot of definitions from a single Greek word. I use a variety of dictionaries (hardcopy; not internet). The best is (in my opinion):

  1. "A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature" by Walter Bauer, Second Edition Revised and Augmented by F.W. Gingrich and Frederick Danker

There's a newer, updated 3rd edition of Bauer's Greek-English Lexicon, but you'll pay over $100 for a new/used copy online. The 2nd edition is just as good; I only paid $30 used for it on amazon.

There's also other hardcopy lexicons:

  1. "Thayer's Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament" by Joseph H. Thayer; Coded with Strong's Concordance Numbers

  2. "Vocabulary of the Greek New Testament" by J.H. Moulton and G. Milligan

Now, if you're looking for internet Greek lexicons, this is one that I always ended up using. I believe it is one of the best general lexicons available on the internet anywhere, for classical or biblical Greek:

perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/resolveform?redirect=true

Just type in the Greek word in the search bar. For example, "Pisteu(oh)" (I believe) would be rendered as "pisteuw" in the search bar. The word will come up, and you have the choice to look it up in a few online dictionary entries.

Again, not a Catholic understanding of the word. But it's at least a start to show you the general definition(s) of the word in question. Then you could probably proceed to look up the word on the internet and see if there is a Catholic understanding of it.

Sorry that I'm not of much help. I myself have not found many great sources for Catholic knowledge of Greek words.


#3

[quote="nicolemertes, post:1, topic:331969"]
Where do Catholics go to see the Greek word used in a passage? Protestants use the Strong numbering system, but I understand that Catholics do not. I have used sites like netbible.org. where that numbering system is used. All I need to do on that site is double click on the word I am interested in and the site sends me to the Greek word and it its definition. Is there a Catholic version of this type of site?

[/quote]

Something I like to do as well of it comes down to a debate between Protestants and Catholics on the definition of a Greek word, is say wait, let's look at what the native Greek speakers (the early church fathers) believed about this issue.

I have found this website very good as well.

interlinearbible.org/acts/2.htm


#4

It's not "catholic" per se but I use biblos.com, it does have the D-R but no version of the RSV which is my preferred version. BUT - you can put in a verse, read it in parallel English (or other) translations, and then switch to the Greek or Hebrew and see a word-by-word list, click on the word and it will give you the chance to see other places it occurs so you can compare shades of meaning in context. Pretty useful.

Sally


#5

[quote="nicolemertes, post:1, topic:331969"]
Where do Catholics go to see the Greek word used in a passage? Protestants use the Strong numbering system, but I understand that Catholics do not. I have used sites like netbible.org. where that numbering system is used. All I need to do on that site is double click on the word I am interested in and the site sends me to the Greek word and it its definition. Is there a Catholic version of this type of site?

[/quote]

Because the Strong's system is tied to the KJV, Catholics may not typically use it but there's no reason we can't in a crunch. What we do use are the same tools non-Catholic scholars use as well, which are critical editions and lexicons. I still can't think of any better Greek lexicon than the BAGD.

As for Greek studies and websites, there really isn't any Catholic vs. Protestant aspect to it. You can use whatever is out there for as long as you know it's accurate (and Greek accuracy isn't a matter of Catholic vs. Protestant; it's a matter of correct translation and parsing).


#6

[quote="nicolemertes, post:1, topic:331969"]
Where do Catholics go to see the Greek word used in a passage? Protestants use the Strong numbering system, but I understand that Catholics do not. I have used sites like netbible.org. where that numbering system is used. All I need to do on that site is double click on the word I am interested in and the site sends me to the Greek word and it its definition. Is there a Catholic version of this type of site?

[/quote]

scripture4all.org/


#7

I use blueletterbible.org/ for checking on Greek and Hebrew meanings via Strong's Concordance.


#8

What is BAGD?


#9

If you are going to use Greek Bible tools, then I strongly suggest getting a grammer book of basic Greek. This way you will be familiar with the language. There are way too many people out there trying to make a point from the Greek text but have no idea other than what some Greek lexicon says.

As mentioned above, learn to consult the Greek Fathers on those passages that you are wanting to understand through Greek eyes. Chrysostom covers about everything in the NT except Revelation. Theodoret, Cyril, Origen (with caution),Theopylact, Oecumenius, Eusebius, etc. Jerome is a great option because he knew Greek, Latin, and Hebrew.


#10

[quote="irenaeuslyons, post:8, topic:331969"]
What is BAGD?

[/quote]

BAGD (second edition) or BDAG (third edition) = Bauer, Aland, Gingrich and Danker. The authors/editors of what's formally known as "A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature". Just about the best and most complete Greek-English lexicon money can buy.


#11

This was my first post and I'm not sure about thread etiquette, but I want all of you to know how touched I am by receiving your very helpful assistance. Thank you so much!:)


#12

Also worth keeping in mind that New Testament Greek is to modern Greek as Old Anglo-Saxon is to modern English.


#13

There’s also this: newadvent.org/bible/


#14

[quote="Jon_S, post:3, topic:331969"]

interlinearbible.org/acts/2.htm

[/quote]

:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


#15

Just to add note:

As for Greek studies and websites, there really isn’t any Catholic vs. Protestant aspect to it. You can use whatever is out there for as long as you know it’s accurate (and Greek accuracy isn’t a matter of Catholic vs. Protestant; it’s a matter of correct translation and parsing).

WHY - Does it ‘not’ matter Catholic vs. Protestant, when doing word study?
BECAUSE - We use the same New Testament, it is the Old Testament in which Catholics have more books.:thumbsup:


#16

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