GreenFaith


#1

Came across this article and thought it was interesting. Would love to hear what people think in regards to being more “green” towards the Earth, does it apply ot your faith, teachings etc.
Here is an excerpt of the article…to read the whole article…
timesleader.com/mld/timesleader/living/11703259.htm
HACKENSACK, N.J. — Fletcher Harper is an Episcopal priest who preaches to Jews, Catholics, Baptists and any other congregation who’ll offer him the pulpit.
He’s trying to convert them — but not in the usual religious way.
Harper wants to convince the faithful that being a servant of God also means being a steward of the earth. Or, to put it another way, being a good Christian, Jew, Muslim or Buddhist also means being “green.”
“When it comes to the environment, we think religious congregations should lead by example,” said Harper, executive director of a group known as GreenFaith.
GreenFaith wants churches to install solar panels and adopt windmills. It wants churchgoers to take stock of their own gas-guzzling and resource-wasting ways and to speak out against what it calls “environmental racism” — instances when polluting industries seek to locate in poor communities that lack political clout. It tells churchgoers to fight for those communities much the way they might feel a duty to work in a soup kitchen for the hungry.
GreenFaith’s message is that taking care of the planet is a moral calling rooted in the traditions and beliefs of most religions.
How successful the group will be at bringing together many faiths remains to be seen. Harper said he has not yet persuaded any Orthodox Jewish, Evangelical Christian or Muslim groups to join.
Some religious groups prefer to form political advocacy organizations within their own faiths, while others have resisted participating in environmental causes because they disagree with the population-control positions some advocacy groups take, Kearns said.
Harper has discovered that his group must carefully navigate the rules of different congregations. Church rules at St Anthony’s Orthodox Church in Bergenfield, N.J., for example, would not allow Harper to give his usual sermon from St Anthony’s pulpit, said Robin Robinson, a trustee on the church council. But the church has conducted an energy audit of its building and will install solar panels this summer, after discussions with GreenFaith and a solar-energy company.
St. Anthony’s is one of 25 area sanctuaries getting solar panels in a program GreenFaith calls “Lighting the Way.” GreenFaith also offers grants to congregations to conduct energy audits and encourages others to “adopt a windmill” by buying power from a company offering renewable energy. It explains ways houses of worship can soften their ecological footprint — everything from installing a water-conserving bank in their toilets to avoiding chemicals when fertilizing their lawns.

On a recent Sunday, Harper led the first of three sessions at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Teaneck, N.J. He read from the Bible’s story of creation — where God entrusts the earth to man — and then asked members to reflect on times when they felt a connection to God while enjoying nature.
GreenFaith appeals to the faithful who might be turned off by more political environmental groups.
-By Colleen Diskin The Record (Bergen County, N.J.)


#2

Considering how the ECUSA (Episcopalians) is falling apart through lack of faith, I’m not surprised that an Episcopalian priest might be more comfortable preaching environmentalism.

If prominent environmentalists had continued to support nuclear power, instead of taking bribes from oil companies and opposing it (admitted in a court case), there would be a lot less air pollution today. Fewer kids and animals with asthma.

jameshudnall.com/blog/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=4

I am deeply suspicious of mainstream environmentalists because they often harm that which they profess to protect. I support more effective organizations like the Nature Conservancy.


#3

[quote=Promotor Fidei]Considering how the ECUSA (Episcopalians) is falling apart through lack of faith, I’m not surprised that an Episcopalian priest might be more comfortable preaching environmentalism.

If prominent environmentalists had continued to support nuclear power, instead of taking bribes from oil companies and opposing it (admitted in a court case), there would be a lot less air pollution today. Fewer kids and animals with asthma.

jameshudnall.com/blog/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=4

I am deeply suspicious of mainstream environmentalists because they often harm that which they profess to protect. I support more effective organizations like the Nature Conservancy.
[/quote]

I think the point that was trying to be made was should we view being “green” as part of our faith? Just like people support Pro-Life becuase of their church teachings should we not also support som esort of “green” conservation as part of our faith?


#4

[quote=Karin]I think the point that was trying to be made was should we view being “green” as part of our faith? Just like people support Pro-Life becuase of their church teachings should we not also support som esort of “green” conservation as part of our faith?
[/quote]

Being good stewards: Yes. Saving species, perserving some land and sea for natural wildlife: Yes. Opposing gross air, water and land pollution: Yes.

However, where do we draw the line? Some environmentalists are simply marxists who oppose progress and want us all to live in communes. They literally want to roll back progress.

“We must… reclaim the roads and the plowed land, halt dam construction, tear down existing dams, free shackled rivers, and return to wilderness millions and tens of millions of [acres of] presently settled land.” - Dave Foreman, founder of “Earth First!”

freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/655207/posts

Farms have been shut down to save “endangered” earthworms. Later the worms were found not to be endangered at all. It turned out to be a deliberate lie to stop farming.

Environmentalists have opposed clearing dry brush around homes to keep from disturbing some endangered rats, then watched as a fire killed both people and rats.

There’s a ton of junk science out there. Can our clergy tell the difference between it and good science? Will we take up larger collections and start hiring environmental scientists, meteorologists, etc. to advise the Church? Will the Church lose parishoners because they make mistakes while advocating environmental causes?

The Church has enough of a problem preaching the Good News now. Too many clergy want to talk about darn near anything else.

I would urge Catholic laymen concerned with the environment to get inovlved, but the Church should not be. The Church can’t be a one-stop shop for all things… running grocery stores, health insurance, light manufacturing and an environmental lobby. That’s not the example of the apostles.


#5

[quote=Promotor Fidei]I would urge Catholic laymen concerned with the environment to get inovlved, but the Church should not be. The Church can’t be a one-stop shop for all things… running grocery stores, health insurance, light manufacturing and an environmental lobby. That’s not the example of the apostles.
[/quote]

I agree the church should not get involved, they have enough on their hands at this time. But people as a whole can do something…I was not speakin gin terms of earthworms or rats but lets start with oil consumption, nucelar energy etc. there are viable options for these things…solar, wind etc. Yet all I see in my church parking lot are SUV’s, minivans and all sorts of gas guzzling autos.


#6

[quote=Karin]I agree the church should not get involved, they have enough on their hands at this time. But people as a whole can do something…I was not speakin gin terms of earthworms or rats but lets start with oil consumption, nucelar energy etc. there are viable options for these things…solar, wind etc. Yet all I see in my church parking lot are SUV’s, minivans and all sorts of gas guzzling autos.
[/quote]

I agree with your sentiments, but I disagree with you about nuclear power.

Wind power kills endangered birds and is expensive. Solar is still far too expensive and would be unaffordable without massive government subsidies (It shows little sign of getting cheaper despite the hype). Biomass still pollutes and almost consumes as much energy as it generates. Dams alter river environments.

Many prominent ecologists are coming to the conclusion that nuclear is the only green solution, the only thing likely to stave off global warming. This article is by the environmental scientist who proposed the Gaia hypothesis:

ecolo.org/media/articles/articles.in.english/love-indep-24-05-04.htm

ecolo.org/base/baseen.htm

This article presents the case nicely also:
jameshudnall.com/blog/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=4

Opposing nuclear power means indirectly supporting the building of more coal plants, cause that’s the alternative that’s being implemented.


#7

I have always felt that it is our job to reduce consumption and help protect the environment if possible. So, yes.

Eamon


#8

I like their message. Its progressive in the proper manner

I think its a good idea for churches that rely upon donations to install solar panels… costly to install, but in the long run they would save thousands on electricity bills.


#9

[quote=ShroudMan]I like their message. Its progressive in the proper manner

I think its a good idea for churches that rely upon donations to install solar panels… costly to install, but in the long run they would save thousands on electricity bills.
[/quote]

:slight_smile: not that expensive when you get your state and federal rebates back …:slight_smile:


#10

we were commanded to tend the Garden. I think enviornmentalism should be a pillar of anyone’s faith.


#11

Nice post Valke2.

I would not use the word pillar or faith, more like use common sense and above all do no harm.


#12

I was going to go with “cornerstone” but I was feeling a bit biblical.


#13

Did you know … that 33% of most packaging is unnecessary.


#14

Yup…


#15

Not to mention a pain in the @#$ to open up. I cant tell you how many times I have sliced my fingers or hands opening up some $%^& package.


#16

Happy Belated B-Day btw. I am sorry I messed up on that one.

I’ll have a B-day drink in your honor today.

Wish I could buy ya one.


#17

From The Catechism of The Catholic Church:

373 In God’s plan man and woman have the vocation of “subduing” the earth as stewards of God. This sovereignty is not to be an arbitrary and destructive domination. God calls man and woman, made in the image of the Creator “who loves everything that exists”, to share in his providence toward other creatures; hence their responsibility for the world God has entrusted to them.

377 The “mastery” over the world that God offered man from the beginning was realized above all within man himself: mastery of self. The first man was unimpaired and ordered in his whole being because he was free from the triple concupiscence that subjugates him to the pleasures of the senses, covetousness for earthly goods, and self-assertion, contrary to the dictates of reason.

God love you,
Paul


#18

environmentalism is a from more valuable ‘truth’ than many give it credit for. Our future progeny will lament our misuse of gaia.

Go Green!


#19

Most of that unnecessary packaging is meant to make the package larger in order to prevent shop-lifting.

Paul


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