Gun ownership in this day and age


#42

I understand your desire to own a gun. I also think you need to respect your wife’s wishes. Having said that, what is her reason(s) for not wanting a gun in the house? If you’re not exposed to guns they can be very scary. Respect her wishes but you can also have reasonable discussions on how the gun will be stored, loaded or unloaded, inaccessible to children or anyone easily for that matter.

Perhaps if you educate and make concessions on HOW it will be in the house, she may eventually change her mind.

Just some thoughts from this little old grandma that owns guns herself!


#43

Yes. We are bound to obey just laws.

Also, if my husband bought a gun and brought it into our home without my agreement, he would be moving out and taking his gun with him.


#44

While said in jest, this is actually very good advice. If you do not agree on your worldview (world is going to hell in handbasket so let’s buy guns vs believe that things will work out view), it is going to come up during marriage.


#45

THIS!

Another option: do any of the ranges offer storage lockers where you can store your weapons? That might be a reasonable compromise.


#46

self-defense is a valuable purpose that is supported by the church

most of the time you do not even know when someone is carrying, so how can you say society is less safe or not?

How do you define safer? Take England, they have fewer murders but they are more likely to be involved in a violent crime than an American. Would you consider that safer?


#47

Take all of the knives out of the kitchen, as they make you nervous. Knives, the silent killers that never run out of ammo.


#48

Regardless of what you do, do not underestimate the power of pepper spray and stun guns which are tasers that do not shoot. I would guess your wife would be ok with that.


#49

If you can convince your wife to go to the range with you, she’ll probably turn out to be a better shot than you and she’ll get hooked on it.
Women are just better shooters. Don’t know why, exactly. Breath control or something.
Anybody don’t believe me? Check this young lady out!


#50

My .22 caliber handgun has gotten me plenty of meat in the form of rabbits and squirrels, so that is not a “valuable” purpose"? My 9mm handgun serves to protect me and my family, so that is not a “valuable purpose” either? Thankfully we live in a nation where we can make our own choices concerning our personal security. Remember, the police almost always show up after something happens and are rarely present when most needed.

Countries like “gun free” Britain are not safer. Knife and acid attacks are completely out of control.


#51

@Odilon

Hunting serves a purpose but people generally don’t use handguns to hunt. They use rifles or bows. Having a gun for “protection” does not protect people. A husband who owns a handgun is putting himself, his wife, and his children in greater danger than if he did not have one. Women are not safer by owning guns. They are less safe.

England isn’t the perfect example to use but England is a substantially safer place than the USA. Knife attacks happen but they are far less likely to be lethal. Most people who commit crimes aren’t psychopaths out to kill people. They want something. Criminals are people too. Avoiding escalation is half the battle and that can’t happen if people are allowed to carry weapons of death.

Collectively, the USA needs to change this federally so that people cannot own handguns. Admittedly, having a gun free zone surrounded by an ocean of people that are (wrongfully) allowed to own and carry guns is not effective. A constitutional amendment wouldn’t be necessary because there is already legal precedent of banning various firearms. Most of the strong gun supporters that claim to be sticking closely to the constitution are adhering to a revisionist history that started when libertarians took over the NRA in the 1960s/1970s. American gun views aren’t only eccentric to the rest of the world but they are also eccentric to the majority of American history.


#52

Ummm no they are not!!
Where did you pull that stat from?

Btw they have way fewer murders.


#53

What do you mean “this day and age” OP?

I would argue that present society is a nicer time to live than ever before. Life expectancy is higher, we have no had a world wars in a considerable amount of time, the amount of people living in poverty is at an all time low. Minorities such as indigenous and black communities are improving their outcomes (albeit slowly in some cases) and woman are much closer to having equal rights. The right to an education is a given and in most first world countries health care is universal.

I’m with your wife on this one. But I am Australian and from a culture where no-one really owns guns. I don’t really understand the argument of the first amendment - my understanding it was written in a time there was a fear of invasion from England. And I am pretty certain they didn’t envisage semi-automatic weapons. But I suspect I will get very little support from a majority US audience :slight_smile:


#54

You need to source this.
It does not ring true.


#55

The second amendment is in place not to allow hunting, but for the ability to protect oneself from a tyrannical government and crime. People who don’t think they would ever have to worry about the US suffering from tyranny are kidding themselves. You only have to look at some of the radical proposals some elected officials have to see how this could happen. Crime is more rampant in the big cities with strict gun laws where only the police and the criminals have firearms.
Personally, I don’t have a gun, but I’ve been trained in the military and would be comfortable with one. However, my wife doesn’t want one. Unless she would be willing to be trained in the use of a firearm, I wouldn’t get one. Having a weapon that could be accessed by someone who doesn’t know how to use one is dangerous. I don’t need her shooting at a shadow (which may be me) because something spooked her one night.


#57

I’ll keep my firearms and my carry permit. But thanks for sharing!


#58

But is a law that makes self defense more difficult really just? I don’t think so.


#59

When I was learning to shoot I heard this, too, and asked. It has to do with how women squeeze the trigger vs. men. Men tend to “muscle” the trigger rather than gently squeeze it. One of the first things men have to be trained to do is to gently squeeeeeeeze! :grin:


#60

That makes sense.
An instructor once told us how, after watching him compete in cowboy action shooting for a while, his wife tried it. She got good, real good, passed him up and became US champion for several years running.

I’m just okay, but I love my cowboy six shooters: .357, .45 Colt (the classic), and Henry lever action carbine. All fun!


#61

When gun enthusiasts start posting glamour shots of guns and ammo, it’s time for me to get out. See ya!


#62

You’re in a pickle. I agree with you that things are bad. In the US the liberal left is fostering hate with their anti Catholic political stance, their attack on religious liberty, the violence against supporters of our Pro Life President. I have never owned a gun but I am going to get one now before they make it harder to obtain one. Thankfully my wife is on board also and will have her own weapon. I told her the bad guys are getting badder and I’m getting older so she needs to be able to protect herself.

But obviously you shouldn’t break the law and you need to respect your wife and not hide anything. But you can keep trying to convince her why you think it’s necessary and ask her to trust you.


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