halloween

Do most traditional Catholics celebrate Halloween? I think Halloween celebrations and the like or even just giving recognition to Halloween is a smokescreen covering up the fact that it is evil. Satan can be crafty making it look harmless. Anyway, I am not sure if when my kid gets older to let him trick or treat. I feel pressure to let because he will miss out on flub. Makes me feel guilty. Am I the only one out there that think this? Thanks

Seriously? I was taught as a child that Halloween was evil due to its relationship with the Catholic holiday of All Saint’s Day. I never would’ve thought a Catholic would be anti-Halloween.

Our parish has an All Saints Party every Halloween. Every child dresses up as a saint, and then we have a “Parade of Saints” where each kid goes up on stage, says which saint they are and what that saint did in their life. We usually accompany this with a potluck and many fun games for the kids (that dish out candy for prizes, of course).

So when it’s all said and done, the kids have a lot of fun, they get to hang out with friends, they learn about many Catholic saints, and they still get their candy. And they do all of it without coercing people into giving them treats with the threat of tricks. :smiley:

I turned out fine. I guess I never looked at it that way.

Halloween is pagan to the core. Dressing children up as witches, devils, and the like leaves an impression on them that all of it is cool.

No Catholic child should be taught to celebrate such a holiday.

jmo

The only person I’ve ever personally ran into who felt that Halloween was evil, was a “crazy lady” I once hired to work in the front end in my office. She belonged to a small, local fundamentalist church with a hell-and-brimstone preacher—the kind of church where they read you the riot act for an hour, then everyone forms a line, marches up to the front and the preacher smacks them in the forehead at which point they fall in the aisle and convulse or some such.

I knew what church she went to–everyone in town knows about that church-- and I hired her anyway because she needed a job, was qualified and so on. And we got along fine until about the end of September–first of October when I brought in a sack of Halloween decorations and told my front end ladies that whenever they had time, here was some Halloween stuff to put up and that I’d bring in candy to pass out to any kids that came in the entire week before and up to Halloween. Everybody seemed pleased–especially about the idea of a full week of candy, which being a bunch of women–well c’mon, does it get ANY better than that? LOL!

Th next day, the “crazy lady” asked to speak to me, came into my office with her bible in tow and one of the little hang up skeletons I’d bought, opened her bible and read me a passage and told me that I could not do Halloween as it was a pagan tribute to Satan and a “abomination before God”. I listened to her politely, told her that all 5 of my kids enjoyed trick-r-treating, and I simply disagreed with her belief. She told me that she could not have any Satanic decorations around her–that it was a strongly held religious belief. I explained that candy was a strongly held belief of my own. And then we solved the problem amicably.

I fired her butt, put up my skeletons and hauled in the candy! I think it might work that way with a few muslim idealogues too if someone had the nerve to just try it! It’s my office–my way!! LOL!:thumbsup:

Costumes are fun. Candy tastes good. Telling Scary Stories is fun.
Just don’t get carried away. The evil that came from Halloween in America as a Commercialized Holiday is we Catholics forgetting the Feasts Days…and our prayers for those in purgatory in GENERAL.

The Pagans of today have an obsession with witches, zombies, vampires and ghost stories because outside of the Church, one still has a need to acknowledge something beyond the material, visible world. Why wouldn’t we as humans have that in the back of our minds, we’re each assigned a guardian angel!

that’s just my point of view, I’m not a theologian or anything so don’t take my word for it!

lol good anecdote ,

Someone is pushing it here in Australia. I saw a stand the otherday with these kind of things.

This is just a bit off topic, but don’t forget about the 8 days after Halloween and the plenary indulgences we can gain for the poor souls in Purgatory each of those days.

**Indulgenced Acts for the Poor Souls **
A partial indulgence can be obtained by devoutly visiting a cemetery and praying for the departed, even if the prayer is only mental. One can gain a plenary indulgence visiting a cemetery each day between November 1 and November 8. These indulgences are applicable only to the Souls in Purgatory.

To attain a plenary indulgence, three conditions must accompany the prescribed act:

  1. the faithful must receive the sacrament of confession, either eight days before or after the pious act is performed,
  2. receive Holy Communion on that day
  3. and recite prayers for the intentions of the Holy Father (one Our Father and one Hail Mary is the minimum, but any other additional prayers may be added).

catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/activities/view.cfm?id=1178

This is just a bit off topic, but don’t forget about the 8 days after Halloween and the plenary indulgences we can gain for the poor souls in Purgatory each of those days.

**Indulgenced Acts for the Poor Souls **
A partial indulgence can be obtained by devoutly visiting a cemetery and praying for the departed, even if the prayer is only mental. One can gain a plenary indulgence visiting a cemetery each day between November 1 and November 8. These indulgences are applicable only to the Souls in Purgatory.

To attain a plenary indulgence, three conditions must accompany the prescribed act:

  1. the faithful must receive the sacrament of confession, either eight days before or after the pious act is performed,
  2. receive Holy Communion on that day
  3. and recite prayers for the intentions of the Holy Father (one Our Father and one Hail Mary is the minimum, but any other additional prayers may be added).

catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/activities/view.cfm?id=1178

Well, considering all Catholics attended a Latin Mass prior to 1962, and all the Catholic kids in my neighborhood including myself during the 1950s celebrated Halloween I would say YES, “traditional” Catholics take a *balanced *approach to this holiday.

One of my best memories of parochial school was attending kindergarden and we got to wear our Halloween costumes and sand Halloween songs — and this was in those “wonderful days” prior to Vatican II.

Your children will face greater exposure to evil than Halloween!

Ah - Autumn…The air cools, the leaves turn, the birds head south…and out come the annual threads dedicated to the upcoming holidays of Halloween and Christmas…
Nice to know that we are pretty much right on schedule…:thumbsup:

Great answers above. I count myself as one of those who was raised as a traditional Catholic by devout parents and who went our trick-or-treating dressed (as I recall now) variously as a hobo or a soldier or a ghost etc. and who didn’t turn out too badly.

Granted that there are pagan roots and aspects - but to say that Halloween is Pagan to the core is to fail to recognize that the word “Halloween” itself is Christian…It is a contraction / corruption of “All Hallows Eve” - or the eve of all saints day.
So - **Halloween **is not pagan at all…they way that many celebrate the day - - well that’s a different matter.

Dressing children up as witches, devils, and the like leaves an impression on them that all of it is cool.

I agree with this to an extent, but would add that if they are properly and lovingly exposed to the faith (as I was) for the other 364 days of the year the silliness of this one day is not likely to leave a very large impression.

No Catholic child should be taught to celebrate such a holiday.

jmo

I think it might be better said that no Catholic child should be taught to celebrate “All Hallows Eve” in an inappropriate way.

Peace
James

In England you get a lot of satanists going to churches and desecrating them to the point that some have a police presence.

Generally it gives teenagers a right to hassle people on their doorsteps and offer them a trick or treat+trick.

Crime appears also as people can walk around in scream masks and nobody takes any notice of them.

Anyone who thinks it is just a bit of fun is in denial.

It is also a popular time for young people to go ghost hunting in haunted places.

It annoys me when catholics celebrate halloween and All Saints Day is pushed back or away altogether.

When my three youngest children were still young enough for trick or treating, they dressed as Blessed Mother, St. Michael the Archangel, and St. Therese of Lisieux. They did this as the parish party as well. They also wore these costumes to the public elementary school they attended, and it served to bring out a good discussion about St. Therese with the kindergarten teacher!

It helps a lot to focus on “All Hallowed Evening”.

A good story to tell on Halloween is the one about all the saints rising from Hades. Muhahaha.

LOL. Someone should teach that lady a thing or two about Christmas, then.

Slightly off topic here, but I find it amusing that “traditional” automatically becomes “whatever Catholics did in the United States in the 1950’s.” :stuck_out_tongue:

Egh, I love Halloween, always have, always will. I love the look of it, I love the spooky decor, I love the focus on death (because we all need a reminder that we won’t be around forever). I’ve celebrated it every year of my life, and I will continue to do so with my children baring a Vatican decree.

To me, Halloween is just a day, were you dress up and collect candy,we don,t celebrate it any other way,some say it,s the Devil,s day,but I don,t beleive it that noncence.

Someone who wants to commit a crime may use Halloween as an excuse, but even if you take Halloween away, they’re still going to do it anyway. Same goes with ghost hunters etc…
Anyone who doesn’t see that is in denial.
Your list has nothing to do with little kids dressing up as soldiers, firemen, and etc and going from door to door with little bags getting candy.

I don’t see anything wrong with it.

And if a child is dressed up like a box of M & M’s? What’s crazy to me is how Halloween has become an ADULT holiday over the last 10 - 15 years. We’ve been getting catalogs of adult costumes, yard decorations, Halloween party supplies, etc. As far as I can see, it’s the adults that have been introducing the seriously “dark” edge to Halloween, not how the kids are dressed. For most of my life the night has been about kids and candy and either home made costumes or Disney princess dresses off the store self. But lately the apparent need for wild adult parties, costume day at the office, and hanging orange lights around your yard like they were Christmas lights seem to have become the thing. The issue isn’t how the kids are dressed; the only thing making an impression on them is the amount of candy they get. It’s the adults, as usual, messing-up what had been in my youth a low-key and relatively innocent (the occasional toilet-paper house wrapping excepted) night.

:thumbsup:

My plans for Halloween and the surrounding days:

*My dorm has a haunted house on Halloween night.
*Either the weekend before or the weekend after, I might have a marathon of the creepiest episodes of TV shows. Including, but not limited to AtlA’s Puppetmaster (bloodbending) and Doctor Who’s Empty Child (Are you my mummy?). (And Blink. Always Blink. Or don’t blink :p)
*Dorm Halloween party some time close to Halloween. I’m probably going as Link, and just need to find a green dress to use as a tunic.
*Dorm trick-or-treating some time close to Halloween.
*And on Halloween night itself, again, Evening Prayer I for All Saint’s Day

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