Harry Potter Media


#1

Do you feel that watching movies or reading books about Harry Potter is considered evil?


#2

I voted yes but would rather the question was, “Do the Harry Potter books and movies glorify evil?” To this I say yes. The stories glorify the occult, making it very appealing to young people. Interest in the occult among adolescents has skyrocketed since Harry Potter burst onto the scene. The stories also glorify an ends-justify-the-means philosophy. These qualities are not exclusive to Harry Potter. A great many movies and books for kids glorify evil.

For more on this subject, I recommend the book “A Landscape with Dragons: The Battle for Your Child’s Mind”, by Michael O’Brien. He has also written an article comparing Harry Potter to The Lord of the Rings and The Chronicles of Narnia. You can read it here: lifesite.net/features/harrypotter/obrienpotter.html


#3

I agree with Rejoice’s comments above.
Jaypeeto3 (aka Jaypeeto4)


#4

Great books-great movies. And to anyone who disagrees:"Furnunculus "


#5

I agree…I’m going with Fr. Amorth on this one. :wink:


#6

I find this qoute from Tolkein to be quite enlighting in view of the fact the reason people seem to have such a problem with Harry potter is that it takes place in “our world”

"I am historically minded. Middle-earth is not an imaginary world. … The theatre of my tale is this earth, the one in which we now live, but the historical period is imaginary. The essentials of that abiding place are all there (at any rate for inhabitants of N.W. Europe), so naturally it feels familiar, even if a little glorified by the enchantment of distance in time. Letters, 239 (#183)


#7

All I know is that anyone who thinks you can learn about the occult from Harry Potter must rely on second-hand information. If I can fix my problems by waving a piece of wood and chanting some latin words…

Wait a sec…

goes and gets a small branch

opens up bank account

E PLURIBUS UNUM!


#8

Such prescience. Tolkien must have been a sorcerer!:eek:


#9

we all went together as the Newmen Center to see Harry Potter last year. Even the most conservative of conservative Catholics in the group did not object to going. The point is that thinking Harry Potter is evil is in the same category as thinking the breaking the speed limit is evil. Just being overly scruptulous


#10

Breaking the speed limit can be evil, if it endangers others. Ditto, I don’t think HP is inherently evil, but it *can *be harmful, just like Superman, or Looney Tunes, or Invader ZIM. It can only be harmful, though, if parents are stupid and don’t watch over their children.

And I’ve read Landscape With Dragons. All I can say is…what on earth was that guy smoking? It’s on a par with Turmoil in the Toybox, a piece of late '80s fundie agitprop by “Phil Phillips” (sadly I think that’s his real name). His stunning brain came up with such tinfoil hat theories as:
Care Bear Stare=Satanic magic
My Little Pony=the Beast of Revelation
Smurfs=Paganism.
:eek:


#11

I’ve heard that before, too. However, can we ever go back to any point in history? It represents a completely different time and age. HP is supposed to be living in the present time, which a child can obviously relate to. Using this quote is comparing apples and oranges.:wink:

To clarify to others…I don’t think that HP is inherently evil. As another poster said, I simply believe that it may easily lead a child to sorcery. A great many people (including myself), as children, found magic to be a subject of great interest. However, some more impressionable children may try to act on it…being drawn closer and closer to the occult.


#12

Several questions, particularly to all who have replied to this thread:

For those who do not believe that the Harry Potter stories serve to glorify evil, do you believe in demons? I wonder if there is a correlation between belief in demons and concern about the influence of evil in the media.

If you do not believe in demons, what is your understanding of evil and how do you reconcile your beliefs with those of the Catholic Church and with Scripture passages in which Jesus casts out demons?

If you do believe in demons, wouldn’t you agree that it makes sense to suppose that evil spirits would wield their superior intellects to fool us and our children, the next generation, with the subtle allures of evil mixed with good (good being the perfect trojan horse for evil)?

If you agree with the above, do you not think that a child rooting for a boy hero (Harry) might be tempted to desire the powers of magic/occult (evil: wanting power outside of God’s graces) in the name of good (fighting the evil Lord Voldemort or his modern day equivalent)?


#13

:amen:


#14

First off i wonder if you have read the books.

Second- Harry potter doesn’t glorify evil. Harry has learned throughout the last 6 years that about making decisions just like any other child. He and many main characters have had to pick a side. You must understand the basic of the characters to understand and see the fight versus good vs evil. This fight exist into our world today so why should it not exist in the fanasty world of harry potter?

Third- Harry doesn’t crave power to defeat his enemies. Compare him to snape or malfory characters. Harry wants to learn about magic because he is a wizard and studying it. In reading the books you would know that in almost all of Harry’s battles he has always been “less” of a wizard then some of the people he has gone up against. He wins his battles because of luck and the fact that he believes in himself.

IFour- Harry and those who choose to fight on his side are willing to lay their lives down in the fight against evil because they understand that is not about the indiviual but about society in general. If the evil side wins then the world is doomed to be run by a mad man who craves all the power he can claim and that would be the desctruction of society. Even when harry was the only one to see the evil in book 4 come to life he proclaimed it from the rooftops and didn’t let anyone deny that evil existed. By speaking out he warned the world of the coming evil. He didn’t back down even though he was only 14 and less of a wizard in his soicety. Thats what kids today need to do. Speak up against evil in the world when the adults tell you to ssshh and be quite.

Beckers


#15

I agree. Oops! I went over the speed limit on purpose and with full intent - I knew I was breaking the law by doing 58 in a 55 and didnt care - but yet, I dont feel the need to confess this at all. :slight_smile:


#16

Only Muggles have to obey speed limit laws-you just need to make sure you throw the invisibility switch before starting off…


#17

:rotfl:

And make sure you don’t hit a tree that hits back.


#18

Did you use a time turner?


#19

If you think Harry Potter novels are evil does that also mean you think fairy tales are bad? I read this article in Catholic News printed out below
**
[size=]Vatican ‘no problems’ with Harry Potter **

The good versus evil plot of the best-selling J.K. Rowling books are imbued with Christian morals, a Vatican press conference was told yesterday.

Secretary of the European Conference of Bishops Fr Don Peter Fleetwood said: “I don’t see any, any problems in the Harry Potter series.”

Fleetwood was responding to questions following the release of a new Vatican document on the New Age phenomenon, which he helped draft as a member of the Pontifical Council for Culture.

Fleetwood was asked whether the magic embraced by Harry Potter and his friends at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry was problematic for the Catholic Church. Some evangelical groups have condemned the series for glamorizing magic and the occult.

“I don’t think there’s anyone in this room who grew up without fairies, magic and angels in their imaginary world,” said Fleetwood, who is British. "They aren’t bad. They aren’t serving as a banner for an anti-Christian ideology.

“If I have understood well the intentions of Harry Potter’s author, they help children to see the difference between good and evil,” said Fleetwood, currently in the secretariat of the European Episcopal Conference. “And she is very clear on this.”

He said British author J.K. Rowling was “Christian by conviction, is Christian in her mode of living, even in her way of writing.”

SOURCE
AP[/size]


#20

I wonder: are the bulk of Catholics that believe the “Harry Potter” novels to be evil converts from heretical Christian sects?


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