Has anyone been to or attended University Mass?


#1

I planned on attending a bilingual church (English and French) near the university I'm attending. But I discovered another parish on the same street as my university. Its 100% English and very big on community involvment. I noticed though that at 7:30pm on Sundays they have University Mass. Basically from what I understand, this mass is specifically for people in their late teens to 30 years old. At 9:30AM there is family mass and at 11:30am there is all ages mass. I am not a night owl and I usually do morning mass but I think that university mass will be very beneficial for me because there is a lot things that will allow me to meet and get to know people who are my age and get involved in different activities. It is starting next Sunday and I'm curious if anyone has ever done anything like it an could share their experience.


#2

My parish does not have this, but I am SO jealous and you should definitely take advantage of it! Being around people in somewhat similar stages of life who believe the same things you do is a great blessing...one that does not happen very often where I am!


#3

[quote="confusedgirl, post:1, topic:336404"]
I planned on attending a bilingual church (English and French) near the university I'm attending. But I discovered another parish on the same street as my university. Its 100% English and very big on community involvment. I noticed though that at 7:30pm on Sundays they have University Mass. Basically from what I understand, this mass is specifically for people in their late teens to 30 years old. At 9:30AM there is family mass and at 11:30am there is all ages mass. I am not a night owl and I usually do morning mass but I think that university mass will be very beneficial for me because there is a lot things that will allow me to meet and get to know people who are my age and get involved in different activities. It is starting next Sunday and I'm curious if anyone has ever done anything like it an could share their experience.

[/quote]

I don't grasp the concept of Family Mass, Youth Mass, your example University Mass, etc. because every Mass should be open to anyone. I know all Masses are open to everyone which begs the question why such Masses?


#4

[quote="Bergon, post:3, topic:336404"]
I don't grasp the concept of Family Mass, Youth Mass, your example University Mass, etc. because every Mass should be open to anyone. I know all Masses are open to everyone which begs the question why such Masses?

[/quote]

Could be the difference in homilies, music, that sort of thing. If would certainly help towards alleviating some of the usual complaints we hear on CAF-

"I don't like the music at Mass"........one at the same parish, but at a different time will likely have different music (chant, full choir, guitar, etc) and people can choose which they prefer to attend

"kids are too noisy" .....if that's the gripe, attending another offered Mass than the family one might be in order

"homily doesn't seem relevant for me" ....this is going to happen regardless of where you attend, but if you are a college student/young adult and Father's homilies are always focused on families or older adults.....well, you get what I mean.

I think it's wonderful that there are Masses geared towards various groups of parishioners.


#5

[quote="dlobrien, post:2, topic:336404"]
My parish does not have this, but I am SO jealous and you should definitely take advantage of it! Being around people in somewhat similar stages of life who believe the same things you do is a great blessing...one that does not happen very often where I am!

[/quote]

I definitely will :)


#6

[quote="dlobrien, post:2, topic:336404"]
My parish does not have this, but I am SO jealous and you should definitely take advantage of it! Being around people in somewhat similar stages of life who believe the same things you do is a great blessing...one that does not happen very often where I am!

[/quote]

:thumbsup:


#7

Go for it as long as it is Catholic! We have Masses in English and Spanish also. One parish we attended had a Tongan Mass - beautiful singing!. We also had a youth Mass with a special rock choir. It was very well attended by young people from around the deanery. Masses for special populations is a good way for people to celebrate Mass in a comfortable way, and become engaged with others in the parish with similar interests. I never felt I could not attend one of the other Masses, and in fact, enjoyed doing so.


#8

[quote="Bergon, post:3, topic:336404"]
I don't grasp the concept of Family Mass, Youth Mass, your example University Mass, etc. because every Mass should be open to anyone. I know all Masses are open to everyone which begs the question why such Masses?

[/quote]

From what I'm told the youth do a lot during it. So the youth choir sings, the alter servers are youth, the lector are youth and I think its a great way to get youth more involved


#9

[quote="LightBound, post:4, topic:336404"]
Could be the difference in homilies, music, that sort of thing. If would certainly help towards alleviating some of the usual complaints we hear on CAF-

"I don't like the music at Mass"........one at the same parish, but at a different time will likely have different music (chant, full choir, guitar, etc) and people can choose which they prefer to attend

"kids are too noisy" .....if that's the gripe, attending another offered Mass than the family one might be in order

"homily doesn't seem relevant for me" ....this is going to happen regardless of where you attend, but if you are a college student/young adult and Father's homilies are always focused on families or older adults.....well, you get what I mean.

I think it's wonderful that there are Masses geared towards various groups of parishioners.

[/quote]

Thanks for your input. I find those are common excuses for people not wishing to go to mass or they say its boring. I find if you have groups set for youth more youth will come. Once a friend said they didn't want to go to mass because its for old ladies :eek:


#10

[quote="confusedgirl, post:1, topic:336404"]
I planned on attending a bilingual church (English and French) near the university I'm attending. But I discovered another parish on the same street as my university. Its 100% English and very big on community involvment. I noticed though that at 7:30pm on Sundays they have University Mass. Basically from what I understand, this mass is specifically for people in their late teens to 30 years old. At 9:30AM there is family mass and at 11:30am there is all ages mass. I am not a night owl and I usually do morning mass but I think that university mass will be very beneficial for me because there is a lot things that will allow me to meet and get to know people who are my age and get involved in different activities. It is starting next Sunday and I'm curious if anyone has ever done anything like it an could share their experience.

[/quote]

Our Sunday evening Mass is geared to high school and college students. Amazingly, it probably is also the most reverent so you see a lot of "serious" Catholics there as well.


#11

I used to help out at a university chaplaincy when I was preparing for ministry. The mass was fairly informal and well attended; it also attracted students from all over the world who just happened to be Catholic.

That was how I, as a new convert, found out just how catholic (in the literal sense of the word) the Catholic Church is.


#12

[quote="Ohana, post:7, topic:336404"]
Go for it as long as it is Catholic! We have Masses in English and Spanish also. One parish we attended had a Tongan Mass - beautiful singing!. We also had a youth Mass with a special rock choir. It was very well attended by young people from around the deanery. Masses for special populations is a good way for people to celebrate Mass in a comfortable way, and become engaged with others in the parish with similar interests. I never felt I could not attend one of the other Masses, and in fact, enjoyed doing so.

[/quote]

Thanks for your input :)


#13

[quote="Urn, post:10, topic:336404"]
Our Sunday evening Mass is geared to high school and college students. Amazingly, it probably is also the most reverent so you see a lot of "serious" Catholics there as well.

[/quote]

Wow that's really cool to hear :) I haven't been to youth mass exactly but I've been to elementary school mass and it felt like a slightly less formal version of Sunday mass. I think because the teachers run it they keep it as close to a regular mass as possible


#14

[quote="Valeite, post:11, topic:336404"]
I used to help out at a university chaplaincy when I was preparing for ministry. The mass was fairly informal and well attended; it also attracted students from all over the world who just happened to be Catholic.

That was how I, as a new convert, found out just how catholic (in the literal sense of the word) the Catholic Church is.

[/quote]

Woe that must have been a great experience :thumbsup: I am even mlre excited to go to my first university mass


#15

I live near a University parish that I occasionally attend if my schedule doesn't permit me to participate in my regular parish. At the "University Mass," this atmosphere is very informal and community-oriented. There are fewer people, and the College-age audience is not static; in fact, I see mostly retired folks. :p (This might be because this is not the church on the campus itself, but is a second building a few miles away.)


#16

I have been to many university masses and they really don't differ much from the regular ones you will witness at any other mass in general. Because it is a student mass, you are more apt to encounter a more informal and more community atmosphere. Because there are lots of students, it becomes easier to meet new people and develop some friendships. The homily will be more directed to a student population which is to be expected. Sometimes students will talk and sometimes will grab coffee afterwords. The university mass can be lots of fun therefore, I highyl encourage all students if there is one offered at a parish near their university, to check it out.


#17

My undergraduate days (long ago) were at King's College London where I studied Mathematics. There was also a Faculty of Theology, mainly for training Anglican priests, but with broad ecumenical appeal.

The Catholic Society organised a weekly Mass in one of the tutorial rooms. The college Catholic chaplain was the usual celebrant, although if there was a theological conference taking place, it could be any priest who was attending. One day, we were waiting for the priest to arrive and in walked Cardinal John Heenan, (Archbishop of Westminster and head of the Catholic Church in England and Wales). He was a charming man. He said a simple Mass and then stayed and chatted to the students until we had to get away for lectures.


#18

Our parish has a Mass geared toward university students. And we only hold it during the school year. But we don't call it a "University Mass."

It is held at 8PM on Sunday night.

The students are the readers, ushers and the choir.

But of course everyone is welcome to attend the Mass. In fact, if you need some hope for the future of our Church, going to this Mass, will do it for you. :thumbsup:


#19

From past experience I associate youth Masses with banal music and priests trying to act hip rather than reverent. I'd typically stay away and just find a Mass that's well-celebrated.


#20

Masses on or near college campuses are often held at "off" hours to encourage students to attend. Usually there is a late afternoon or evening time. The campus near us has a 10pm Sunday mass. No excuse not to get to mass! The choir, readers and altar servers are usually college students. The homily will be directed to young adult issues. Otherwise they are the same as any other mass. I have no problem with masses geared toward particular stages in life. Usually it is just the time and the homily which are the biggest differences. As others have said its a good way to meet other Catholics I the same stage of life.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.