Has anyone seen The King's Speech?

Saw it this evening. If you haven’t seen it, I recommend it :slight_smile:

imdb.com/title/tt1504320/

It’s on my list. I’ve heard many good things about it.

Yes, we saw it a few weeks ago. I thought it was one of the best movies I’ve seen in a long time. I actually couldn’t understand the R rating, as I’ve been to PG 13 rated movies with much more foul language. (Actually, considering who was doing the swearing, and in the particular context, it was very funny.)

The acting is terrific and the story wonderful. I hope it cleans up at the Oscars.

Queen Elizabeth, the daughter of King George VI, seemed to approve of the film, calling it “moving” and "enjoyable."
smh.com.au/entertainment/movies/queen-gives-kings-speech-a-royal-nod-20110205-1ahni.html

I thought it was an amazing movie. One of the best I’ve seen, honestly. And it was made even better by the fact that the last movie I’d seen before it was the terrible, horrible film “The Delimma”.

[quote="dixieagle, post:3, topic:228216"]
Yes, we saw it a few weeks ago. I thought it was one of the best movies I've seen in a long time. I actually couldn't understand the R rating, as I've been to PG 13 rated movies with much more foul language. (Actually, considering who was doing the swearing, and in the particular context, it was very funny.)

The acting is terrific and the story wonderful. I hope it cleans up at the Oscars.

[/quote]

:thumbsup: Yes, Colin Firth in particular is superb as Bertie/George - so totally in the part that I had to keep reminding myself that the actor doesn't really have a stammer.

[quote="dixieagle, post:3, topic:228216"]
Yes, we saw it a few weeks ago. I thought it was one of the best movies I've seen in a long time. I actually couldn't understand the R rating, as I've been to PG 13 rated movies with much more foul language. (Actually, considering who was doing the swearing, and in the particular context, it was very funny.)

The acting is terrific and the story wonderful. I hope it cleans up at the Oscars.

[/quote]

The producers appealed the R rating and lost. There is a possiblity that they may tone the language down to get a PG 13.

[quote="Yellow_Belle, post:6, topic:228216"]
:thumbsup: Yes, Colin Firth in particular is superb as Bertie/George - so totally in the part that I had to keep reminding myself that the actor doesn't really have a stammer.

[/quote]

I really appreciate Colin Firth as an actor. He's wonderful in everything I've seen with him.

(And he'll always be the number one "Mr. Darcy" in my eyes no matter how many versions of "Pride and Prejudice" they make.) :p

[quote="Sarabande, post:8, topic:228216"]
I really appreciate Colin Firth as an actor. He's wonderful in everything I've seen with him.

(And he'll always be the number one "Mr. Darcy" in my eyes no matter how many versions of "Pride and Prejudice" they make.) :p

[/quote]

Well, Olivier wasn't a slouch either :)

But if they'd put Colin Firth with Keira Knightley (who played Elizabeth in a different film version of P&P) I reckon that'd be near perfect casting. :thumbsup:

That’s true. :slight_smile: In this regard, I think for me it’s more of a matter of preference rather than acting ability because Olivier was an incredible actor.

Keira Knightly did a good job in that version, but I much preferred Jennifer Ehle’s Elizabeth Bennett. That’s only because it’s how I imagined Elizabeth in looks, demeanor and delivery when I first read the novel. And I really enjoyed the repartee between Firth and Ehle much more than between Knightly and MacFadyen (and I LOVE Matthew MacFadyen as well as Firth. “Little Dorritt” was one of my favorite series to watch on DVD last year after I had my little girl and was confined to the house while I recouperated.)

But really, just all preference. They’re all good. :thumbsup:

Back to topic - I can’t wait to see “The King’s Speech” now.

Aww, but going off topic is SO much fun, especially when the topic is bonnet dramas :slight_smile:

I just think Jennifer Ehle wasn’t physically right. Jane Austen talks about Elizabeth having a ‘light and pleasing’ (ie slim) figure, and lovely as Jennifer Ehle is, I wouldn’t describe her body shape as ‘light’. :shrug:

Saw it. Loved it. On my personal Top 5 list. Seriously, if Colin Firth doesn’t get the Academy Award for that brilliant performance, then the people vote probably didn’t even watch the movie. It was absolutely amazing, in my humble opinion.

So true. :smiley: I’m just a sucker for period dress and I’m not ashamed to admit that I’m a total dork about it. :stuck_out_tongue:

haha! I guess that’s where I pictured things differently in my head. :o I viewed J.E.'s figure, although full by today’s standards, “light and pleasing” by past standards. I think K.K. is too skinny and bony, and although I thought she did a decent job acting-wise, her look was just totally off in my head of how I pictured Eliza and I had a difficult time reconciling it. It’s really funny how the mind works, isn’t it? That said, age-wise, she was perfect. I think she was the same age as Elizabeth was supposed to be when she played the part and Ehle was 26 when she did it so she was few years older.

I’m looking forward to seeing the new version of “Jane Eyre”, but I’m so afraid that it might be Hollywood-ized. Keeping fingers crossed that it won’t be.

Thank you for this interesting thread. Your kind sentiments, and your thoughtful appreciation of Colin Firths latest effort. We have of course, been rooting for him in regard to the Awards. He comes from a well educated family with both parents in Academia, and his grandparents were involved with Missions serving overseas. Thus, Colin grew up and was educated in several countries giving him a first hand, deeply instilled consciousness of tribal and minority cultures in foreign countries, their struggles for survival, and basic practical needs.

Whereas many big ‘Stars’ give of their time and energy to laudable charitable causes, and all power to their elbow for doing so, but never the less, do so in a way that project ‘themselves’ in whatever cause they are serving. Colin seems to have been able to positively move forward the agendas of a multitude of very worthy causes indeed, without projecting himself onto them, or raising his own profile by way of that, ‘feeding’ off the issues, via good Public Relations that glowingly enhance his own image.

He seems to have pulled off the trick of perfecting the promoting the causes themselves, whilst ‘reducing the dimensions’ of his own personal exposure as the agent that raises the needy causes, and giving them a higher public profile. To my mind, this puts him in a different league altogether, within an Industry that is all about promoting ‘Stardom and Celebrity’. Head and shoulders above the many that want to be personally feted and celebrated, sometimes for the particular good works, that they do.

Colin has an incredible talent, directly coupled to an instinct and aurora of complete and utter, personal humility. He also doesn’t take himself too seriously as a ‘Star’. The result is a deeply compelling, powerfully attractive, quiet passion and approachable human personality, that palpably runs beneath whatever Acting part he plays. The man is so much more than the part, interesting though it might be, and brings those inherent qualities to inform and direct everything he does. These characteristics of his upbringing, family background and life experience are what set him apart, but essentially, do not set him in any sense, ‘above’ the rest of us.

Women in particular, find this quiet, humble, deeply passionate personality, incredibly attractive. And men of quality, find his finer sensibilities, and sensitivities an excellent role model. Everyone has strengths and weaknesses, and Colin is certainly no exception.

But discovering, understanding and playing to our strengths, is a large part what a successful life is all about. Second to this, but of hardly less importance, is understanding the weaknesses and disabilities inherent in our personalities and natures, and not only learning how to deal with, and minimise their impact but much more significantly, how to utilise these weaknesses, revolutionising them in a completely positive manner.

So I would like to focus on the issue of disabilities, and how we view and treat those people the world might seem as insignifiant, which is an important theme of the Film if I may.

On occasion’s I have been asked to speak at The Officers Train Corp at Oxford University. An Army Officer once said, “All weather is good in War, the key is knowing how to use it, and now to turn the prevailing conditions, to your advantage.” Anyone can see problems, but the thing is, to be the person, the key individual that can see the possibilities and opportunities that are dormant and lurking, disguising themselves as obstacles and reasons why we just can’t win.

It’s about turning setbacks into spring boards, and stumbling blocks, into stepping stones! One of the U.K.'s most successfully celebrated Businessmen, an Oxford Graduate is actually dyslexic, but that didn’t stop him from becoming a tour de force on the Stock Market. On the contrary, I believe it was a spur to success. A way of compensating for, proving to himself and the world, that no matter what the problems in his life were, they could be completely turned around. In point of fact, the worse the problems in Business are, the more he seems to like it, as overcoming them, is then a truly remarkable achievement.

Yet despite his immense Business interests, every month he returns to his old College and holds meetings specifically for dyslexic students, providing insight, support and direction to brilliant young students as well as a great example to follow. There are more important things in life than money, though we do of course all need it.

I like Musical Instruments of all types and have had a lifelong interest in them. In the UK the greatest Percussionist we ever produced was James Blades O.B.E. who has written a great many Books, mainly on Percussion and the ‘Bible’ on the History of Percussion for other great Percussionists that followed. Going to his lectures at Oxford were an adventure. Having him explain how when the ‘talkies’ came along and working with Charlie Chaplin, where the diminutive hero had to meet the baddie for a shootout at 12 noon. They couldn’t create an authentic ‘tick tock’ for the big clock that raised the tensions as the time for conflict grew ever closer.

To resolve the situation, and getting the right solid click sound required, James took two large kettle drums, and placed a big cymbal over the head of each of them. He then took two thick half crown coins and placing them over the bell of the cymbal, clicked the coins against the thick bell. It did the trick! A truly ‘Solid Tick’ from as a Grandfather Clock!

When Prime Minister Winston Churchill (who was born, close to my home) here.

youtube.com/watch?v=MdwU9nGsH7E

youtube.com/watch?v=z5bbgtI9z_g&feature=related

Wanted to give his war time messages for transmission to countries across the Globe, he wanted a simple musical introduction, featuring a “sound” that the Nazi’s would not be able copy, as reassurance to troops in faraway places that it was really him, and so they consulted James Blades. And James (with his incredible collection of extremely rare, unusual and Historically notable Musical Instruments which I’ve seen and experienced personally) produced a very rare type of African Drum, and on it played the first few notes of a Beethoven Symphony, using a soft yellow cloth as a mute on some of the notes.

You will have seen the huge Gong played by the Strong ‘he man’ at the opening scenes of the J. Arthur Rank Films. In actual fact that Gong was made out of cardboard. The real Gong of course belonged to James Blades, who really played it, and it was around 2 1/2 feet in diameter. James was a wonderful character. He was inspired to become a Musician when the saw the Bass Drum of a Salvation Army Band Marching by.

**It is a Parable of sorts! ****If so much outstanding greatness, that has served the entire world can be inspired in a little boy by so seeing small a thing. How much more care should we take, in all that we say and do, and in the innumerable little things, that we expose to others, throughout our daily lives, that may actively inspire or discourage them.

To me, wonderful St. Theresa is the exemplification and very greatest example of this. Her example helped me to understand the power and riches of The Heritage and Blessings of The Saints, and how we directly benefit from the important lessons The Great Saints have to teach us.**

Another great British percussionist is Dame Evelyn Glennie. One of the greatest most celebrated percussionist on the planet. Sometimes huge companies, such as I have ‘an interest’ in sponsor events like this one, that they originally sponsored for TED. Everyone should watch this video.

ted.com/talks/evelyn_glennie_shows_how_to_listen.html

**Evelyn was virtually totally deaf by the age of 12. **She applied to attend the Royal College of Music but they wouldn’t even grant her an audition because of her deafness. Eventually they caved in, granted an audition, and her performance was so brilliant that not only did they grant her a place in the College. But the British Law was subsequently changed as a result of that audition, so that today, no person in the U.K. can denied the opportunity to audition for a Music College place, or a Professional Orchestral Position, because of a disability.She can tune her Tympani to the correct pitch simply by accurately sensing the vibrations in her fingertips. And uses various parts of her whole body, to sense different sounds and their pitches. After you have seen the Video, you will realise that everything we understand about hearing sound by the ear alone, is simply but a part of the story of how we sense sound.

There is another parable here, if we think in spiritual terms, we need so much to learn how to listen. But to the voice of God! Some of the most impressive people I have met in my life, have been people of less than impressive dimensions and of quite diminutive stature. The famous Missionary Gladys Aylward hyperhistory.net/apwh/bios/b3aylwardg.htm (The film The Inn of The Seventh Happiness was made about her life) was a tiny woman, in real life people in the street would not give a second look at. Prime Minister Margret Thatcher of the Falklands War who came to see me was also a very diminutive figure in real life.

To return to the Film that inspired this thread. It’s worth realising that from long before the moment of his Birth. Preparations and Plans were made for Prince Edward the heir to the throne of Great Britain. He was never going to ‘just become’ The King of England. His whole life had been carefully planned out, shaped, taught, informed and directed towards that final step of becoming King.He was totally trained to the task, and fully cognisant, with all that the role would involve. Completely equipped to be a King. His brother George, or whoever is second or third in line to the Throne, have no such pressures nor anything like the same type of training, support or pressure to conform. As a result, they are simply no one where near as being up to the Task, and with any type of socially inhibiting disability, would naturally feel completely out of their depth, as George VI did.

Following the heir to the Thrones abdication, his supportive wife appalled at the toll she knew the pressure of the role would place upon him as King, also found herself in a completely unexpected new role. Having married, expecting a life of unbridled privilege, fun and leisure, they were suddenly Key Players in the History of the Nation. An earlier King George, George III also suffered from a debilitating and deeply distressing ailment. A brilliant man, scholarly, and deeply supportive of both the Sciences and the Arts, he was a Musician himself. In fact a relative (the tech who looks after most of my Musical Instrument Repairs) recently repaired King George III Cello, which is now privately owned, but still retains a Golden Crest and Insignia of Royalty on its back. He repaired 29 cracks in the wood and replaced a block of wood that was missing inside.

I hope you enjoy the Film and trust something I have written here, will prove to be of genuine interest and enlightenment. I am not disabled myself, but feel the lessons of this Film. Go far towards helping us understand important lessons for in the struggle of life, whether disabled or not.

PP

[quote="Sarabande, post:13, topic:228216"]
So true. :D I'm just a sucker for period dress and I'm not ashamed to admit that I'm a total dork about it. :p

haha! I guess that's where I pictured things differently in my head. :o I viewed J.E.'s figure, although full by today's standards, "light and pleasing" by past standards. I think K.K. is too skinny and bony, and although I thought she did a decent job acting-wise, her look was just totally off in my head of how I pictured Eliza and I had a difficult time reconciling it. It's really funny how the mind works, isn't it? That said, age-wise, she was perfect. I think she was the same age as Elizabeth was supposed to be when she played the part and Ehle was 26 when she did it so she was few years older.

I'm looking forward to seeing the new version of "Jane Eyre", but I'm so afraid that it might be Hollywood-ized. Keeping fingers crossed that it won't be.

[/quote]

I'm with you! I preferred Ehle's and Firth's version, mostly because of the visual appeal. Knightly's version was too "dirty." I had a hard time with Mr. Darcy in the new one, he just wasn't aloof or gentlemanly enough, his face was too emotive. I also thought they took their creative liberty a little far in regards to Mr. Bennet (plants instead of books), and could not for the life of me keep the sisters straight. In the A&E version, I feel like they did better matching wardrobes with characters, to give the viewer visual cues to who each character was and a hint at their personality.

[quote="PJD1987, post:12, topic:228216"]
Saw it. Loved it. On my personal Top 5 list. Seriously, if Colin Firth doesn't get the Academy Award for that brilliant performance, then the people vote probably didn't even watch the movie. It was absolutely amazing, in my humble opinion.

[/quote]

Very good film.

I actually thought that Geoffrey Rush was the better actor in this film.

Quote: "I actually thought that Geoffrey Rush was the better actor in this film. "

Are you Geoffrey Rush?

PP

[quote="larkin31, post:17, topic:228216"]
Very good film.

I actually thought that Geoffrey Rush was the better actor in this film.

[/quote]

I thought Rush was better as well. Firth was good but I liked him better in the 2009 film Easy Virtue.

No, I am not. :wink:

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