Has the Catholic Church accepted "Roman"?


#1

From what I understand the term “roman” started out as a slam by the English after they broke away and needed to differentiate themselves.

Seems like I see quite a few references to 'Roman Catholics" even when the worldwide Church is being spoken of.


#2

[quote=mark a]From what I understand the term “roman” started out as a slam by the English after they broke away and needed to differentiate themselves.

Seems like I see quite a few references to 'Roman Catholics" even when the worldwide Church is being spoken of.
[/quote]

**Yes you’re right, it is commonly used in English speaking countries. I never heard of “Iglesia Catolica Romana” (spanish). **

Here’s a good link: newadvent.org/cathen/13121a.htm


#3

I guess you’e right about it starting out as a slam, i.e. “Romanism.” But English speaking Catholics seem to have accepted the use of the term “Roman Catholic Church.”

It’s really not accurate, though, since the universal Catholic Church consists of many rites besides the Roman, and all are in union with the Pope.

So the next time someone tells me about all the horrors of the “Roman Catholic Church,” I’ll just say, gosh, maybe you’re right; I guess I’ll join the Ruthenian Catholic Church.


#4

[quote=JimG]I guess you’e right about it starting out as a slam, i.e. “Romanism.” But English speaking Catholics seem to have accepted the use of the term “Roman Catholic Church.”

It’s really not accurate, though, since the universal Catholic Church consists of many rites besides the Roman, and all are in union with the Pope.

So the next time someone tells me about all the horrors of the “Roman Catholic Church,” I’ll just say, gosh, maybe you’re right; I guess I’ll join the Ruthenian Catholic Church.
[/quote]

I accept it only when refering to the Latin rite, but for the whole Church, I say Catholic. I also always try to use Catholic, because I’m Catholic first before Latin.


#5

I’ve never heard of a hierarchial member of the Church refer to it as the Roman Catholic Church, unless when it refers to certain Rites and it’s location (…Rome…).


#6

[quote=mark a]From what I understand the term “roman” started out as a slam by the English after they broke away and needed to differentiate themselves…
[/quote]

No, it didn’t. It was commonly used in the Middle Ages–granted, usually in some such formula as the “Holy Roman Church” (Sancta Romana Ecclesia).

[quote=mark a]Seems like I see quite a few references to 'Roman Catholics" even when the worldwide Church is being spoken of.
[/quote]

The idea that “Roman Catholic” is politically incorrect is, like other bits of PC ideology, of relatively recent vintage. I don’t know of any Catholics who objected to it until the rise of the contemporary “apologetics movement,” although certainly in polemical contests Catholics were quick to point out that they were (in their own view) simply “Catholics” and not some aberrant subspecies called “Roman Catholics.”

Edwin


#7

[quote=AsStAnselmPrays]I’ve never heard of a hierarchial member of the Church refer to it as the Roman Catholic Church, unless when it refers to certain Rites and it’s location (…Rome…).
[/quote]

Not even. I never read a church document that said “Roman Catholic Church.” They usually say “Church of Rome,” “Roman Church,” “Roman rite,” “Latin rite,” “Latin Church,” “Western rite,” or “Western Church.”


#8

[quote=mark a]From what I understand the term “roman” started out as a slam by the English after they broke away and needed to differentiate themselves.

Seems like I see quite a few references to 'Roman Catholics" even when the worldwide Church is being spoken of.
[/quote]

The secular world wishes to call the entire Catholic Church by the name Roman Catholic Church, as is clear by a cut from Webster’s dictionary:

[list]
]Greek Catholic n (1909) 1*: a member of an Eastern church 2: **a member of an Eastern rite of the Roman Catholic Church
[/list]
See, the Eastern rites are considered to be part of the Roman Catholic Church, hence they must mean the entire Catholic Church when they use the word Roman. I grew up Protestant and I certainly was instructed that the Roman Catholic Church meant the whole kit and caboodle. It means those folks who are in communion with Rome/the pope, whomever they are.

I do not recommend following this secular usage.


#9

[quote=Pug]The secular world wishes to call the entire Catholic Church by the name Roman Catholic Church, as is clear by a cut from Webster’s dictionary:
[list]
]Greek Catholic n (1909) 1*: a member of an Eastern church 2: **a member of an Eastern rite of the Roman Catholic Church
[/list]See, the Eastern rites are considered to be part of the Roman Catholic Church, hence they must mean the entire Catholic Church when they use the word Roman. I grew up Protestant and I certainly was instructed that the Roman Catholic Church meant the whole kit and caboodle. It means those folks who are in communion with Rome/the pope, whomever they are.

I do not recommend following this secular usage.
[/quote]

**Amen! In fact, I consider that usage offensive as equal or worst to that of “Papist” or “Romanist.” Now I know, next time someone uses that term like that, I’ll tell them off.:mad: **


#10

**From now on I will refrain from using the term. When talking about the Church of Rome, I will simply say “Church of Rome” or the “Latin Rite.” I hope this thread convinced others to refrain from using it, at least a little.:wink: **


#11

[quote=mark a]From what I understand the term “roman” started out as a slam by the English after they broke away and needed to differentiate themselves.
[/quote]

As Catholics not united to Rome, they found it necessary to distinguish themselves from “Romish Catholiques” (the phrase was in use at least as early as 1575) - the label is as much an allowance that the Roman Church was Catholic, as an insistence on the Catholicity of the English Church reformed and given its religious settlement under Queen Elizabeth I.

[font=Arial]

Seems like I see quite a few references to 'Roman Catholics" even when the worldwide Church is being spoken of.[/font]

“Holy Roman Church” is the correct ET of “Sancta Romana Ecclesia” (abbreviated as S.R.E.) - and the term “Roman Church” has, or has had throughout the centuries (including the time before the Reformation) several different referents:

[list]
*]the diocese of Rome
*]the cardinals as its maior et sanior pars
*]the Church in the Latin West
*]the Church now often referred to as the Roman Rite (this was far less common before the Eastern Catholic Churches ceased to be looked on as mere appendages of the *Ecclesia Romana Universalis - *the other Catholic Rites in the West appear to have been eclipsed)
*]the Roman and Universal Church throughout the world - i.e. the Ecclesia Militans.
[/list]There is also (from the Liturgy of the Mass, for example):
[list]
*]Ecclesia Sancta Catholica
[/list]and a good few other phrases. ##


#12

“The term “Roman” or “Romish” Catholic first came into use by Protestant writers in the early 17th century who highly resented the Roman claim to any monopoly of the term Catholic.”

Personally, I have no objection to this description because it means I follow the teaching of the Bishop of Rome and the Magisterium.

From Peter the Apostle, to JPII the Great to Benedict the Beloved.
Go Benny Go!


#13

Actually, that quote is on my website life.org.nz/abortionreligiouskeyissuesromancatholicism.htm
not awhat you would call a ‘pro-life’ website


#14

I have no problem w/ being called a “ROMAN CATHOLIC”,even though I don’t use the term unless there is some reason to distinguish a difference from the “EASTERN ORTHODOX”, also the word “CHISTIAN” was used as a slam towards any follower of Christ.
I can handle these slams by taking some pride in the idea that it sets us apart from the “world” & its view of how things should be


#15

[quote=Gottle of Geer][/font]

As Catholics not united to Rome, they found it necessary to distinguish themselves from “Romish Catholiques” (the phrase was in use at least as early as 1575) - the label is as much an allowance that the Roman Church was Catholic, as an insistence on the Catholicity of the English Church reformed and given its religious settlement under Queen Elizabeth I.

[font=Arial]

[font=Georgia]## “Holy Roman Church” is the correct ET of “Sancta Romana Ecclesia” (abbreviated as S.R.E.) - and the term “Roman Church” has, or has had throughout the centuries (including the time before the Reformation) several different referents:
[list]
*]the diocese of Rome
*]the cardinals as its maior et sanior pars
*]the Church in the Latin West
*]the Church now often referred to as the Roman Rite (this was far less common before the Eastern Catholic Churches ceased to be looked on as mere appendages of the *Ecclesia Romana Universalis - *the other Catholic Rites in the West appear to have been eclipsed)
*]the Roman and Universal Church throughout the world - i.e. the Ecclesia Militans.
[/list]There is also (from the Liturgy of the Mass, for example):
[list]
*]Ecclesia Sancta Catholica
[/list]and a good few other phrases. ##
[/quote]

Yes, the term *Holy Roman Church * was used when announcing the election of Cardinal Ratzinger to the papacy: Dominum Josephum Sanctae Romanae Ecclesiae Cardinalem Ratzinger. It’s commonly used when referring to the office of cardinal.


#16

The term ‘Roman Catholic’ came into being when High Church Anglicans wanted to use the word ‘Catholic’ to describe them selves (so called ‘Anglo-Catholics’) without seeming too papish. Therefore it is an insult and I never use it, though it is no longer an insult. I use ‘Catholic’ because I am a part of a universal Church, not a section of it. In fact, the only ‘Roman Catholics’ in the world would be a Catholic from Rome :smiley:

Michael :wink:


#17

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