Have any been watching the Frontline specials on the historic Jesus?

I think its a re-run, but I am finally getting a chance to watch the recent Frontlines on the historic Jesus. I am wondering about reactions to it and any thoughts on it. Its been very informative. :shrug:

Some of it's good, some of it isn't.

Like anything else from the secular media about Christianity or the Church.

Whatever claims they make double check with the Magisterium. My experience with these programs is they very rarely interview an orthodox priest and always have their featured liberal protestant scholars and an obligatory one from Notre DAme.

I haven’t, but as the other poster said, they’re secular. The key word is ‘historic’.

Not necessarily bad, but incomplete from the Christian perspective.

[quote="buffalo, post:3, topic:180717"]
Whatever claims they make double check with the Magisterium. My experience with these programs is they very rarely interview an orthodox priest and always have their featured liberal protestant scholars and an obligatory one from Notre DAme.

[/quote]

The initial claims the program makes, in a nutshell, is that Jesus lived in a far more "Romanized" world than many Christians have been taught. That is to say, he did not preach simply amoung the Jewish people of a Judean backwater. Further, that Jesus was a scholar and was more likely involved in the politics of both the local Jewish populations as well as the Roman ruling classes that lived in the area and that his life was more likely entwined in those political struggles than we might see simply through the story of his life as passed down through the traditions of Christianity.

References made in the program include one to the Mithradic faith, also popular in the region at the time where the god of that religion was apparently born of a virgin and who celebrated his birth on the Dec. 25 date (according to the roman calander of the time) and
the very coinage in circulation in Judea held an image of Agustus in which the term "Son of God" was imprinted. Further, there were many religious preachers at the time and in that area who would heal the sick. I found this of interest because if true, it demonstrates that the themes found in Christianity were not new ones.

I did find Dominic Crossen (the "obligatory Notre Dame scholar") very erudite and reasoned.

The program also discussed the development of the synoptic Gospels, how they differ, but how they must be seen in light of Mathew's Gospel. It discussed the writings found in the Dead Sea Scrolls in light of Christian thought and belief at the time. The critical role the Greek language (and Greek influence) played in the development of early Christian thought, all of which I personally have had an interest in exploring.

The program explores not only the life and role of Jesus, but the later development of Christianity (really a Jewish sect) and its co-optation much later by Constantine.

As far as the Magisterium, I will certainly see how they defend or support the contentions of this most illuminating program!

[quote="Agripa, post:5, topic:180717"]
The initial claims the program makes, in a nutshell, is that Jesus lived in a far more "Romanized" world than many Christians have been taught. That is to say, he did not preach simply amoung the Jewish people of a Judean backwater. Further, that Jesus was a scholar and was more likely involved in the politics of both the local Jewish populations as well as the Roman ruling classes that lived in the area and that his life was more likely entwined in those political struggles than we might see simply through the story of his life as passed down through the traditions of Christianity.

References made in the program include one to the Mithradic faith, also popular in the region at the time where the god of that religion was apparently born of a virgin and who celebrated his birth on the Dec. 25 date (according to the roman calander of the time) and
the very coinage in circulation in Judea held an image of Agustus in which the term "Son of God" was imprinted. Further, there were many religious preachers at the time and in that area who would heal the sick. I found this of interest because if true, it demonstrates that the themes found in Christianity were not new ones.

I did find Dominic Crossen (the "obligatory Notre Dame scholar") very erudite and reasoned.

The program also discussed the development of the synoptic Gospels, how they differ, but how they must be seen in light of Mathew's Gospel. It discussed the writings found in the Dead Sea Scrolls in light of Christian thought and belief at the time. The critical role the Greek language (and Greek influence) played in the development of early Christian thought, all of which I personally have had an interest in exploring.

The program explores not only the life and role of Jesus, but the later development of Christianity (really a Jewish sect) and its co-optation much later by Constantine.

As far as the Magisterium, I will certainly see how they defend or support the contentions of this most illuminating program!

[/quote]

Yes - do so.

Crossen is a co-founder of the Jesus Seminar. He is not a proper representative of the Church.

I am aware of the Jesus Seminar. What do you know of it?

[quote="Agripa, post:7, topic:180717"]
I am aware of the Jesus Seminar. What do you know of it?

[/quote]

For one - voting 2000 years later on Jesus based on consensus is not truth.

I’ve seen my fair share of these historical jesus shows so I’m not sure whether I’ve seen this perticular one but they are full of errors like the lack of any theological basis. Jesus is the son of god his historical place is rooted in this fact. But what do you expect from secular media? even when they are talking about something good the church has done they are always playing that “dark” music that makes good sound evil. I once saw back in the 90’s a documentry on Pope John Paul II and it showed him giving a speach on human rights while the music from star wars was playing you know that darth vader theam. this is part of the reason i no longer watch t.v.

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.